SYRIA & Growing

2.5 million

Project Caost

70%

Raised
Lady Fatemah TrustBACK TO APPEAL SEARCH

6th
Jan
2016

Exciting and innovative, the LFCT introduces a new partnership with the Soular Backpack


ethiopia 1ethiopia 2ethiopia 3 The LFCT are very excited to partner with an innovative solar light product, the Soular backpack and with your help together, we can provide 500 backpacks to children across Ethiopia.   Ingenious yet simple, the Soular Backpack enables children in rural areas to study through the night and take control of their own education, and their own futures. Designed by Salima Visram, a student at McGill University in Canada, the backpack is a new and innovative product offering a novel has a solar panel attached onto it and gets charged on a child’s walk to and from school every day. The battery pack in the bag later connects to the LED lamp that will power their studies at night.   Often, parents can’t afford to buy kerosene every day, which means that after dusk, children can’t study. In addition, kerosene fumes are carcinogenic, pose a number of health risks, and are therefore not conducive to learning. The naked flame from the lamp is extremely dangerous, often burning nearby clothes, and books.   When children can’t do their homework or study regularly, their grades suffer incredibly, and they consequently don’t make the grades required to be accepted into secondary school. This means they drop out of school after grade 8, hence perpetuating the vicious cycle of poverty. Furthermore, families living under $1 a day spend over 25% of income on kerosene every month, and today, over 1.2 billion people use kerosene as their only source of light after dusk.   Each backpack provides 5.5 hours of light after being in the sun for an hour. So far, The Soular Backpack has been featured in the Forbes Magazine, in the Huffington Post, on Nation TV, the Daily Nation, CBC and CTV, among others.   The initial prototype was tested in the Kikambala village in Kenya in December 2014 and was introduced through focus groups with mothers in the village, school children of different ages and interviews were held with families to understand even more deeply the effects of kerosene on their lives, and what type of solution would be best. The feedback from the villagers was very positive, and there was a lot of excitement, media attention and interest from various companies in Kenya to take this on.   Ethiopia is one such country where even in the main urban areas, such as the capital Addis Ababa, access to clean energy is very poor. In Addis Ababa about 20% of people use kerosene, while the remainder use firewood or charcoal both to cook with and to light the home. 91% of households have no chimney. The negative effects from burning kerosene or other solid fuels for light are obvious.   The LFCT and local partner in Ethiopia are appealing to supporters to help provide 500 Soular backpacks to children in schools across rural Ethiopia, in the North and South West. Children have to walk an average of 2km to school, often in blistering heat over treacherous terrain.   Your contribution will undoubtedly go a long way in paving the way for a brighter future for generations, in Ethiopia.   Impacts:   – The Soular Backpack will give children a chance to take charge of their own learning and education, where their walk to school will equip them with the tools to conquer the darkness of the night, and achieve the grades needed to make it into secondary school. – The parents/guardians will be able to save the money they otherwise spend on kerosene for their children to study, and use it towards a secondary education fund for these children. – The health and safety benefits will be far reaching into the whole family with the risk of lung complaints reducing drastically.   Budget:   Just $20USD = 1 Soular Backpack = 1 child’s education, health and future.   Thank you.
1st
Jan
1970

Please help to provide over one million pieces of vital Medical – syringes and lab Accessories -BD Disposable Medical Supplies for Imam Al-Hujjah Hospital, Karbala, Iraq.


kerbala 1 kerbala 2 kerbala 3 Hospitals are considered one of the most vital services in any community due to their profound effect on all members of the community. The Imam Al-Hujjah hospital in Kabala, has a capacity of 145 beds and is located over eight floors on 1.9 acres on land. It consists of a main building and four auxiliary buildings that support the main functions and is still growing and developing to accommodate more patients. The hospital is located in a province of 1.5 million inhabitants notwithstanding the influx of pilgrims which can number millions each year. The hospital provides them with vital treatment if they need it whilst on their journey.   The hospital is a charitable venture under the Development and Relief Foundation (DRF) which has been operating projects in Iraq since 2004. In recognition of their work, the DRF-Iraq gained the endorsement of the Iraqi Government as an ‘official public charity foundation’ in 2013. The Imam Al-Hujjah hospital project is a charitable hospital founded upon philanthropic contributions. It is not affiliated to any government political, religious or financial entity.   The hospital has appealed to the LFCT for a supply of vital disposable medical supplies including blood collection tubes, syringes, sharps collectors, cannulas and catheters. These are all vital pieces of equipment to carry out numerous medical tests and procedures including blood transfusions, providing intravenous drugs and diagnosing numerous medical conditions to aid faster treatment. In total, these items number over one million, split across 1,735 boxes and will be shipped in a 40-foot container.   This hospital serves thousands of patients a year, many of them pilgrims as they travel through. Without these medical supplies the hospital could face a shortfall. It relies on the good will and philanthropy of donors to cover most of its running costs and with your help the LFCT can supply vital equipment to serve the hospital and its patients with a bulk load of medical supplies. Please help today and make a donation towards this vital project.  
Medical – syringes and lab Accessories -BD Disposable Medical Supplies
 Packing List
 Skids  Description  Boxes  Qty / Box  Total Qty
         
 Skid – 1  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             60         1,000         60,000
   BD Perisafe – Closed End Nylon Catheter             40             50          2,000
   BD Regional Anesthesia Tray               1               1                1
 Skid – 2  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             65         1,000         65,000
   Insuline Syringe             30           100          3,000
   BD Sharp Collectors               2               1                2
 Skid – 3  BD 0.9% Normal Saline Flush Syringe             15           480          7,200
   BD Syringe (3 ml)             60           100          6,000
   BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             18         1,000         18,000
 Skid – 4  BD Sharp Collectors               6               1                6
   BD TB Syringe (1 ml)           104           800         83,200
   BD Syringe (10 / 60 ml)             24           100          2,400
 Skid – 5  BD Sharp Collectors             17               1               17
   BD Syringe (3 ml)             25           800         20,000
 Skid – 6  BD Sharp Collectors               8               1                8
   BD Syringes (mixed)             10           100          1,000
   BD Twin pack double canula             36           400         14,400
 Skid – 7  BD Plasma Preparation Tube             30         1,000         30,000
   BD Sharp Collectors               5               1                5
   BD Needle             20           200          4,000
   BD Non Sterlise Syringe             10           800          8,000
 Skid – 8  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             26         1,000         26,000
   BD Syringes (60 ml)             12           160          1,920
   BD Syringes (5 / 100 ml)             38           100          3,800
   BD 0.9% Normal Saline Flush Syringe             48           120          5,760
 Skid – 9  BD 7 ml Leur Slip Syringe             26         1,000         26,000
   BD 0.9% Normal Saline Flush Syringe               2         1,000          2,000
   BD Syringe (10 ml)             40           400         16,000
 Skid – 10  BD Vaccutainer – Push Blood Collection Tubes             14         1,000         14,000
   BD Syringes (5 ml)             20           400          8,000
   BD Sharp Collectors               2               1                2
   BD Polypropelene Conical Tube               6           500          3,000
 Skid – 11  BD Recykleen Sharp Collectors (Patient Room)               8               1                8
   BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             25         1,000         25,000
 Skid – 12  BD 0.9% Normal Saline Flush Syringe               8           480          3,840
   BD Sharp Collectors               2               1                2
   Insuline Syringe             10           100          1,000
   Hydpak (NSCF Stoppers)             10           400          4,000
 Skid – 13  BD Syringes (mixed)             65           100          6,500
 Skid – 14  BD Syringe (3 ml)             14           100          1,400
   Safety Glide Needles             32           100          3,200
   BD Recykleen Sharp Collectors (Patient Room)               7               1                7
 Skid – 15  BD 0.9% Normal Saline Flush Syringe             16           480          7,680
   BD Syringe (3 ml)             40           200          8,000
 Skid – 16  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             20         1,000         20,000
   BD 0.9% Normal Saline Flush Syringe               5           480          2,400
   BD Syringes (mixed)             30           200          6,000
   BD Locking Braket               3           100             300
 Skid – 17  BD Syringe (3 ml)             16           200          3,200
   BD Glass Syringe Barrels               4           100             400
   BD Sharp Collectors               2               1                2
 Skid – 18  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             42         1,000         42,000
   BD Syringes (5 ml)             43           500         21,500
 Skid – 19  BD Plasma Preparation Tube             30         1,000         30,000
   BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             50         1,000         50,000
 Skid – 20  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             26         1,000         26,000
   BD IV Start Pak               7           200          1,400
 Skid – 21  BD Syringes (mixed)             20           300          6,000
   BD Sharp Collectors               3               1                3
   Safety Pen Needles             30           800         24,000
 Skid – 22  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             72         1,000         72,000
 Skid – 23  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             40         1,000         40,000
   Anesthesia Tray               6               1                6
 Skid – 24  BD Plasma Preparation Tube             28         1,000         28,000
   BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             35         1,000         35,000
 Skid – 25  BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes             50         1,000         50,000
 Skid – 26  BD 0.9% Normal Saline Flush Syringe             16           480          7,680
   BD Vaccutainer – Blood Collection Tubes           100         1,000       100,000
 TOTAL          1,735       30,943    1,057,249
    Thank you generous LFCT supporters.
7th
Jan
2016

A family torn apart: Three small children left without a father are supported by the LFCT Orphan programme


    January 2016   iraq 2 Could you help another family today?   Ali Ammar, aged 11 and his sisters Fatima Ammar, aged 13 and Ramla Ammar, aged 14 live in Kerbala, Iraq.            The children are orphans, living with their mother, Rabab Mizher, in Kerbala since 2006 when they were forced to migrate. The family are Shia but lived in a mixed residential area for Sunni’s and Shia in Baghdad. Tensions began to rise and the Shia community became targets, ostracized for their faith.   For the family, this eventually sadly cumulated in the murder of their father. A man who lived only a simple life and worked in a simple chamber near to his own home, he had no enemies and was well known in his community for being loving and kind hearted. One day in 2006 an unknown assailant targeted him for his faith and he died from a gunshot wound to his head. In 2006 the sectarian war (Sunni-Shia) was very active and tensions were particularly high after the recent destroying of the shrine of Imam Ali AlHadi in Sammraa.   This tragedy tore the family apart and the simple fact is that it occurred because of their belonging to the Shia faith as followers of the lovers of Ahlubait (as).   The children’s mother, Rabab became a widow. Distraught, she had to go on caring for her three children and had no option but to rely on the assistance of charities and her extended family.   Rabab joined LFCT’s micro-finance programme and is actively looking for work from it. Through this project she can lift up her living situation. She discussed this project to her family and her children who welcomed the project with open arms – it means their mother will eventually not have be to depend on anyone else.   The family also receive support for the children under the LFCT Orphan scheme and they are doing very well. Ali, Fatima and Ramla are achieving in their study even through all of the bad experiences they have had to live with at such a young age. Fatima is in the second class of Secondary school, Ali in the sixth class of primary school and Ramla in the third class of Secondary school.   Without support it is likely the children would have had to drop out of school and help their mother find an income for the family, it simply would not have been viable to send the children to school. The LFCT is able to support this family, but there are many more like them in terrible situations, due to no fault of their own. It costs just £30 to support an orphan for a whole month – that is just £1 per day. Please support the LFCT’s flagship programme today and provide an orphan with all the support they need to get a great start in life.   Thank you.   Signed by: Alaa Tareq Al Najjar and Sister Israa Razzaq Al Sikafi    
11th
Jan
2016

Exciting new update: Microfinance for widows in Iraq – making a dignified living for themselves


20+ Widows and Poor Lebanese Ladies will uplift 900+ Poor Iraqi Widows

LFCT Donors: Please donate Generously towards this noble project

iraq appeal 1 iraq appeal 2 iraq appeal 3

The LFCT is delighted to share some exciting news about the future of its widow support programme in Iraq with the Trusts dedicated supporters.

The LFCT has been supporting hundreds of widows in Iraq and it remains one of their biggest programmes. However, regardless of how vital it is, the Trust has always had some reservations about how sustainable such a programme could be and in the long term, has always promoted giving a helping hand rather than a hand out.

A lightbulb moment came for the Trust’s Chairman when talking with one of the Trust’s other projects in Lebanon. The project is a stitching workshop, providing training and a job placement for around 20 widows and poor women – a small social enterprise. When the workshop was in need of a new cohort of ‘stitchers’ and an experienced designer, the Trust wondered if they should look to alter the design of the product and where they should be sold. It was at this moment that the thought occurred to LFCT’s Chairman to see if there was anyway the project in Lebanon could become aligned to pulling the poor widows in Iraq out of poverty.

The idea arose that the workshop could create garments that would appeal to the market in Iraq and could then be sent to Iraq and sold by the widows to help them to generate an income. They would purchase the garments at cost price and keep any profit they made. A trial started with a small group of the widows. After a few months this trial did not receive the welcome the Trust had hoped for. The widows taking part exclaimed that it was very hard for them to undertake as they felt the culture in Iraq was very negative towards women being involved in employment or generating their own income. However, the Trust felt that with enough encouragement that the widows could work through this. The Trust made a bold move and informed this trial group of women that they were being given four months of notice, after which their widow income support payments would stop, however, they were not being abandoned – far from it. They were offered to procure the garments and start selling to generate an income. All of the women took up this offer.

As the project got underway, the quality of the garments and their beautiful designs were a huge success. It was reported that when the widows came to the LFCT’s partner office in Karbala to pick up their cartons of garments for the first time that most of the ladies had sold at least a few items each to the office staff before even leaving to start their selling! They were enthused and very excited to see the reception they would get when selling the garments in their communities.

The future of the programme is bright! At present, the cartons of garments are being transported free of charge by pilgrims as they travel from Lebanon to Iraq, but this does have an impact on the volume of garments that can come through. The LFCT hopes to partner with Iraq to cover the airline cost in the future to freight the items. The fabric, hand loomed scarves, shawls and dishtasha will be sourced predominantly from India.

The hope of the Trust is that all 900+ widows will be weaned off of the income support programme and start selling the garments to make their own incomes and become self-sustaining.

This new scheme to support widows in Iraq remains at the core of the Trust’s values but at the same time ensures a more sustainable model and empowers widows to make their own living with dignity. The impression the widows that are mothers will impart upon their children will be one of hard work and earned income, rather than the values of relying on handouts. Eventually the children too will learn the trade and not end up on the streets and or pushing suitcase hand carts.

The project is of course, still in need of vital funds whilst the widows switch over to microfinance and to support the workshop in Lebanon. We hope that you will agree that this is an exciting and innovative project that we look forward to bringing you more stories of progress about over the coming months.

Thank you.

Signed by: Alaa Tareq Al Najjar and Sister Israa Razzaq Al Sikafi

18th
Jan
2016

The Renovation of the Plumbing System at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi


PHASE 4: APPEAL for Renovation of the ablution blocks at the Male Surgical Ward 5A and the Female Surgical Ward 5B as well as the sluice room at 5B malawi 1 malawi 2 malawi 3 Project Objective To renovate the ablution blocks and sluice rooms of the male and female surgical wards of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, (QECH) Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections to post surgery patients and thereby improve the care and dignity of the patients and guardians who care for them.   The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof to two sets of ablution facilities and to one sluice room.   Project Narrative Every day in Queen’s hospital there are between 160 to 200 surgical patients- those that have undergone a major or minor surgical procedure. The most common procedures are peritonitis, bowel obstruction and septic wounds. The number of patients being treated for septic wounds is very high and this makes it very important for clean and hygienic condition to prevail on the wards and in the ablution blocks.   QECH was built in 1958 and at the time was considered the pinnacle of hospital facilities in Malawi. Today, nearly 60 years later, the buildings are cramped, owing not only to the HIV epidemic but also to an approximately 5-fold increase in Malawi’s population since 1958.  The wards are therefore no longer able to meet the needs of sick patients, let alone their guardians and families, or indeed the medical staff that work there. Statistics reveal the current problem of overcrowding with, for example, the 50-bed women’s ward regularly housing over 70 patients, and sometimes over 100. This overcrowding results in mattresses being placed on the floor between beds and even in corridors. In addition, nursing & medical staff regularly work under extremely difficult circumstances with very limited resources.   QECH is also the major clinical teaching site for Malawi’s only medical school, with over 100 medical students based at QECH each day during the academic year. The Surgical ward is used as a training place for the for the College of Medicine student doctors in Malawi. ChiraFund believes that the creation of a healthier, cleaner and more dignified environment for patients also creates a better learning environment for students.  These graduates are Malawi’s newest doctors and midwives – who will take their experience to district hospitals and health centres throughout the country. We also believe that if they learn their clinical practice in a positive, patient-supportive environment, they will translate this to wherever they work elsewhere in Malawi.    The importance of creating the conditions within which sick patients can be cared for in suitable and comfortable surroundings, as well as accommodating the guardians and families who assist with their care, has long been recognised. After several decades of heavy utilisation, the physical condition of the plumbing system has deteriorated to an unusable state with blocked sewage systems, broken and leaking pipes, unsuitable toilets, broken showers. The current sewage system is unable to cope with the high volume of patients and guardians currently using them. This has led to rats and other vermin taking residence near the wards.   While routine maintenance and ad hoc repairs works have been carried out over the years, the present conditions of the plumbing system present significant infection control risks and compromise the care and dignity of the patients. Nosocomial illness – due to disease-causing organisms spreading between individuals in hospital – is an important risk in crowded wards such as these, for example, women post-partum are particularly susceptible to infections.   The risk of acquiring a nosocomial infection is highest in each ward’s toilet and ablutions block, where up to 200 people share the same seats, sinks, taps, showers and towels.  They also share the same floor – on which most walk bare-foot. The plumbing system, especially the toilet and sink facilities need frequent renovation, as well as thorough and regular cleaning.   At present we recognise that without a complete overhaul, the now ageing system is impossible to clean adequately and are a constant health hazard.  We would like to renovate these with good-quality components and to a design that will allow effective ventilation and efficient cleaning     Project Work plan and Timeline-PHASE 4 The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof to two sets of ablution facilities and to one sluice room. The work will commence on Monday 18th of January and will be completed Friday 5th of February.   Project Budget details and breakdown The total proposed budget is MK7,454,800 (£7,497.275 at exchange rate 14/01/2016).   Technical capacity to deliver the project Over the past ten years, ChiraFund have been involved in many projects at QECH. Some examples of projects our charities have successfully managed in the past include:
  • Complete refurbishment of the TB ward with the aid of a 20 million kwacha grant from the National Bank of Malawi;
  • Refurbishment of ablution blocks on Male and Female ward with the aid of grant funding from Irish Aid;
  • The building of guardian shelters and washing facilities with funds raised from QECH doctors;
  • Renovation of the toilet and shower facilities in dermatology ward with funds raised in UK through individual fundraising, and;
  • The provision of additional medicines, bandages, toilet paper with funds from Charity Advisory Trust UK.
For this project, we secured three quotations from building contractors: DEC Construction, Kamungu Construction and Elite Construction. After interviews and project site visits, the contract will be awarded to Kamungu Construction based on price and ability to do the job. We will use the same approach as we used for the successful renovation of the ablution blocks including:
  • The signing of a contract between ChiraFund and the contractor designed to ensure quality of service and guarantees on the materials;
  • The overseeing of the renovations on a daily basis by ChiraFund project manager George Musowa and ChiraFund coordinator Alice Taylor;
  • Regular monitoring and evaluation by ChiraFund in collaboration with the onsite project manager from the construction company, and;
  • Ensuring the sustainably of the project by regular liaising with hospital administration on-site.
Controls to ensure satisfactory financial management and effective oversight of project resources ChiraFund have very strict financial policies and procedures in place including two signatories on all cheques, bank withdrawals and deposits. All expenditure has to be pre-approved by the trustees and in line with agreed spending for the financial year.   In addition, AMG Global-Certified Global Accountants and Business Advisors provide ChiraFund with accountancy and auditing services and provide an annual check and audit.   All funds donated are receipted and a report documenting and explaining how funds were spent is provided at the end of the project.   All project resources quoted by the contractor, are double checked to be of the standard (make, no, type) agreed by Alice Taylor (co-ordinator ChiraFund) and George Musowa (project manager ChiraFund).   Consultation ChiraFund have consulted with and received permission from QECH hospital management to proceed with this work. We have consulted with ward sisters from each ward; Mr Chimphamba (Chief Plumber QECH_), Mr. Ndovi (Quantity Surveyor), Mr. Mhango (Chief Hospital Administrator) as well as numerous doctors around the hospital including Dr. Bonongwe (Head of Obstetrics), Dr. Mallewa (Head of Medical Wards), Dr. Dube (Head of Paediatrics), Dr. Masambe (Head Oncology) Dr. Huwa (Head of Palliative Care), Dr. Kuweruza (Head of Dental) and a number of guardians and patients.   Sustainability of the project ChiraFund are in ongoing discussions with the hospital administration to ensure the sustainability of the work we do. Hospital Administration has agreed to;
  • Strengthen routine inspection so that problems are identified early and preventive maintenance in place;
  • Increase security in the wards by increasing the numbers of hired guards
  • Provision of staff IDs to maintenance team who go and work in various wards. This will filter fake artisan from the streets who are vandalizing the plumbing equipments;
  • Extend the sourced out cleaning services to wards like Paediatrics and advise them on the type of equipment that they should use in a hospital set up, and;
  • Intensify Health Education talks to guardians and patients on the proper use of ablution facilities.
Reporting and acknowledgement We can provide a mid-term review and a more extensive project outcomes report upon completion with receipts, pictures etc.   We can place a prominent plaque or any other such acknowledgment desired, at the hospital in recognition of the donation from the LFCT.  
Renovation of Surgical Wards Ablution Blocks and Sluice Room- Work plan and Cost
Work plan description QTY Unit Amount
Male Surgical Ward
Toilets-Sanitary Fittings
Flush Master compete set-Toilet 3 210,000 630,000
Squatting pans 3 35,000 105,000
Pan connectors 3 3,800 11,400
110mm PVC Plain bend 6 4,000 24,000
110mm PVC Plain pipes 4 5,500 22,000
1.2” galvanised pipe and fittings, bends, elbows and valves 1 185,000
50mm PVC pipes, connectors 3 2000 6,000
Gully traps 3 25,600 76,800
Shower loss 3 13,500 40,500
110mm inspection tee 3 4,500 13,500
Brick Work
Trip of bricks standard 1 80,000 80,000
Trip of river sand 1 75,000 75,000
Bag of lime plaster 1 7,500 7,500
Bag of cement 25 6,800 170,000
Boxes of ceramic wall tiles 40 12,500 500,000
Tile Grout 10 2,500 25,000
Tile adhesive 120 1,000 120,000
Doors
Steel doors 6 80,000 480,000
Electrical Sphere fittings 4 9,500 38,000
Painting and Decorating
Undercoat paint 4x5litre 20,500 82,000
Wash and wear pain 6x5litres 30,750 184,500
Ceiling paint 3x5litre 6,500 19,500
Gloss paint 4x5litre 28,400 113,600
Paint brushes, mutton cloth, sand papers, crack fillers and turpentine 80,000
Materials needed for Female Surgical Ablution ward
Sanitary Fittings
Flush Master compete set-Toilet 3 210,000 630,000
Squatting pans 3 35,000 105,000
Pan connectors 3 3,800 11,400
110mm PVC Plain bend 6 4,000 24,000
1.2” galvanised pipe and fittings, bends, elbows and valves 1 180,000
50mm PVC pipes, connectors 4 2,000 8,000
Gully traps 3 25,600 76,800
Shower loss 3 13,500 40,500
110mm inspection tee 3 4,500 13,500
Brick Work
Trip of bricks standard 1 80,000 80,000
Trip of river sand 1 75,000 75,000
Bag of lime plaster 1 7,500 7,500
Bag of cement 30 6,800 204,000
Boxes of ceramic wall tiles 25 12,500 312,500
Tile Grout 8 2,500 20,000
Tile adhesive 90 1,000 90,000
Doors
Steel doors 6 80,000 480,000
Electrical Sphere fittings 6 9,500 57,000
Painting and Decorating
Undercoat paint 5x5litre 20,500 102,500
Wash and wear pain 8x5litres 30,700 245,600
Ceiling paint 4x5litre 6,500 26,000
Gloss paint 3x5litre 28,400 85,200
Mutton cloth, sand papers, crack fillers and turpentine 50,000
Sluice Room
Repair to sluice machine 2No 95,000 190,000
Cobra tap pillars 8 24,500 196,000
Labour 895,000
Total 7,294,800
  Professor Alice Taylor (PhD) Coordinator ChiraFund   On behalf of Professor Malcolm Molyneux-Chairperson ChiraFund UK Dr. Jane Mallewa-Chairperson ChiraFund Malawi
19th
Jan
2016

Appeal for the gift of water – new water supply systems urgently needed in Pakistan


pakistan 1 pakistan 2 The proposed schemes will be installed between January – April 2016, reaching nearly 1,000 women, children and men. The villages are all located in the remote regions of the Thar Desert, also known as the Great-India Desert, it is a vast landscape and the 17th largest desert in the world. It also happens to be the most populous desert in the world, despite the lack of fresh and safe supplies of water within ease of most of its inhabitants.   The villages that the LFCT and local partner have proposed working with to supply water schemes are poor and lack the facilities to dig their own wells and build their own hand pumps. With your support the LFCT can provide a vital lifeline of water to ten villages, ensuring their health thrives and they are no longer burdened with a perilous journey to fetch water on a daily basis.   The beneficiaries live in simple houses and most work in agriculture or similar industries. Their remote locations means they lack easy access to many vital services but the LFCT hopes to change part of that by helping to provide a supply of fresh water.  
Proposed Water Wells in Pakistan during January to April 2016
No. Description Approximate cost in PKR GB£
1 Hand pump to be installed in a remote village, Maro Sehta Paro, of the Thar desert in the Sind province of Pakistan. This is an extremely poor locality where villagers have no option but to fetch water from a distance – often over unstable and rocky desert ground. In acute drought conditions they have to migrate in search of water. Can you imagine having this dilemma each time you needed a drink of water or to bathe your children? PKR 66,000.00 £441.31
2 Hand pump to be installed in a remote village, Roheraro, of the Thar desert in the Sind province. This is an extremely poor locality where villagers have no option but to fetch water from a distance – often over unstable and rocky desert ground. In acute drought conditions they have to migrate in search of water. PKR 66,000.00 £441.31
3 Hand pump in a remote village, Niblo Bheel, of the Thar desert in the Sind province. This is an extremely poor locality where villagers have no option but to fetch water from a distance – often over unstable and rocky desert ground. In acute drought conditions they have to migrate in search of water. PKR 66,000.00 £441.31
4 A bore is required in Boghri village, close to nearby Rahi village. The population of 80 people have to travel on steep mountain sides to fetch water from a water pit far away. This water is dirty and unfit for human consumption. Despite being poor, the villagers have pooled their resources together to save Rs. 10,000 assistance towards digging the bore. PKR 66,000.00 £441.31
5 Hand pump to be installed in a locality, Dacca, near to Nara village. This locality comprises of 12 houses and is located far away from any water source. The villagers will make the bore and if water is struck then the LFCT and local partner will provide them with the all gadgetry required to bring water to the houses. PKR 50,000.00 £334.33
6 Bore to be installed in Mohalla Bandi close to Chankot. The villagers will make the bore and if water is struck then the LFCT and local partner will provide them with the all gadgetry required to bring water to the houses. This locality comprises of 12 houses in which 80 people live. PKR 50,000.00 £334.33
7 Bore to be installed at Ban Khaitar close to Rahi. The villagers will make the bore and if water is struck then the LFCT and local partner will provide them with the all gadgetry required to bring water to the houses. This locality comprises of 14 house in which 90 people live. PKR 50,000.00 £334.33
8 Bore to be installed in Chowel locality. The villagers will make the bore and if water is struck then the LFCT and local partner will provide them with the all gadgetry required to bring water to the houses. This locality comprises of 10 house in which 70 people live. PKR 50,000.00 £334.33
9 Bore to be installed in Garhi-Rahi. The villagers will make the bore and if water is struck then the LFCT and local partner will provide them with the all gadgetry required to bring water to the houses. This locality comprises of 15 house in which 90 people live. PKR 50,000.00 £334.33
10 WSS for two localities of Dheri and Hari Bandi close to Rahi requiring a 5000ft pipe. This will see the installation of a gravity flow scheme. At present, water flows far away, on the other side of the village. The water will be brought to a point from where it will be taken to two localities of 30 and 25 houses each. PKR 70,000.00 £468.06
A Total cost of the new 10 schemes PKR 584,000.00 £3,904.95
B Available amount with us from previous schemes. -PKR 68,000.00 -£454.68
C Balance PKR 516,000.00 £3,450.27
2nd
Feb
2016

Iraq’s Orphans – This month’s story is one of growing up without a father – LFCT Donors Please donate generously towards this Noble Project


رباب مزهر (1)

Imam Ali’s views on charity: “Taste the heat of this fire; imagine what punishment awaits one who has neglected the widows and orphans.”

Ali Ammar, aged 11 and his sisters Fatima Ammar, aged 13 and Ramla Ammar, aged 14 live in Kerbala, Iraq. The children are orphans, living with their mother, Rabab Mizher, in Kerbala since 2006 when they were forced to migrate. The family are Shia but lived in a mixed residential area for Sunni’s and Shia in Baghdad. Tensions began to rise and the Shia community became targets, ostracized for their faith.

For the family, this eventually sadly cumulated in the murder of their father. A man who lived only a simple life and worked in a simple chamber near to his own home, he had no enemies and was well known in his community for being loving and kind hearted. One day in 2006 an unknown assailant targeted him for his faith and he died from a gunshot wound to his head. In 2006 the sectarian war (Sunni-Shia) was very active and tensions were particularly high after the recent destroying of the shrine of Imam Ali AlHadi in Sammraa.

This tragedy tore the family apart and the simple fact is that it occurred because of their belonging to the Shia faith as followers of the lovers of Ahlubait (as). The children’s mother, Rabab became a widow. Distraught, she had to go on caring for her three children and had no option but to rely on the assistance of charities and her extended family.

Rabab joined LFCT’s micro-finance programme and is actively looking for work from it. Through this project she can lift up her living situation. She discussed this project to her family and her children who welcomed the project with open arms – it means their mother will eventually not have be to depend on anyone else. The family also receive support for the children under the LFCT Orphan scheme and they are doing very well.

Without support it is likely the children would have had to drop out of school and help their mother find an income for the family, it simply would not have been viable to send the children to school. The LFCT is able to support this family, but there are many more like them in terrible situations, due to no fault of their own. It costs just £30 to support an orphan for a whole month – that is just £1 per day. Please support the LFCT’s flagship programme today and provide an orphan with all the support they need to get a great start in life.

Thank you.

Signed by: Alaa Tareq Al Najjar and Sister Israa Razzaq Al Sikafi

9th
Feb
2016

Bringing water to 2,430 individuals of the Qaca Agro Pastoralist Peasant Association Villages, Ginner District, Bale Administration Zone, Oromia National Regional State, remote rural communities in Ethiopia


 Generous LFCT supporters, please help with a donation to this vital basic need project today. JUST GB£ 0.92 per individual e4e3e2

  Project Summary
  1. Project Name: Rural water supply programme of The Lady Fatimah (as) Charitable Trust Ethiopia intervention 2016
  2. Project Goal: The goal of the project is to contribute to raise the living standards of rural poor by delivering a sustainable quantity of clean water for drinking, sanitation and hygiene benefits
  3. Project Aims:
  • Ensure normal water use for consumption, cooking and personal hygiene in any household is at least 15 litres per person per day.
  • To reduce the maximum distance from any household to the nearest water point up to a maximum of 1km.
  • Ensure that water fetching time at water source is no more than 1 0-15 minutes.
  • Water springs and schemes are sustained such that appropriate quantities of water are available consistently or on a regular basis.
  • To endorse the ownership of ecofriendly hygiene.
  • Reduced prevalence of water-borne diseases.
  1. Key expected results;
    1. Frequency of water-borne diseases and diet related difficulties reduced.
    2. Cost for medical expenditures reduced.
    1. Considerably enhanced hygiene/individual sanitation awareness.
  1. Main project activities:
  • One spring water well-constructed.
  • One water scheme care technician trained.
  • Training and capacity building for CBO & WaSH professionals conducted.
  • 2 water user committees established (WUC).
  1. Location: One village within the Qaca Agro Pastoralist Peasant Association Villages, Ginner District, Bale Administration Zone, Oromia National Regional State, Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia.
  2. Project Duration: One month. The project will be started within one week after the actualization of the grant.
  3. Target Groups: The target group of the project embraces the entire dwellers of the targeted village i.e. women, girls, widows, elderly, those with disabilities, students, youth, teachers, Government civil servants, school, health centre staff, and related institutions including masjid community members including imams, muezzin, students etc.
  4. . Project Beneficiaries (direct):
  • 150 Male Household
  • 205 Female Household
  • 2,430 Total Population
  1. Project Budget: Total Budget: GB£ 3,015.06; OHO & Community Contribution GB£ 350.00;
Appeal to LFCT: GB£ 2,665.06  
  1. Project Background and Justification
The intended project target area or the Qaca agro pastoralist village is one of the agro-pastoral communities of Bale zone in Oromia Regional State of Ethiopia which is suffering from an acute shortage of potable water problems. The target population of the water supply project is the agro-pastoral community relying on the production of dry land crops and livestock rearing. In addition, off farm activities such as fuel wood and charcoal production alongside petty trade are also key in providing livelihoods to the community. Generally, the area is characterized by food insecurity, predominantly due to rainfall shortages and degradation of the natural resource base.   The rural communities of Qaca agro pastoralist Association of Ginir district are classified as one of the worst communities for Bilharzias worm infestations in Bale Administrative zone. The communities lack adequate potable water and most drink from unprotected seasonal ponds, wells and pineal rivers. Drinking water facilities are far from adequate, and the sanitation and hygiene condition of the community is very poor.   Water borne diseases are amongst the most prevalent causes of morbidity. Clinical analysis of the water sources indicated that all the water sources are full of bacteria, pathogens, and have traces of minerals beyond permissible levels. During a cursory baseline assessment with the target communities themselves through a Participatory Integrated Community Development (PICD) approach, safe water was identified as a key priority. An indicator of this is that no public or private toilets exist meaning the community members defecate around the settlements indiscriminately.   The communities are therefore under siege by houseflies, mosquitoes and rodents. There has not been any past attempt to provide potable water and awareness to improve the target communities’ sanitation and hygiene. Currently, the Qaca Kebele/village is in state of sever water supply problem that requires a long term solution. The project proposed will develop the capacities of rural communities of Qaca Villages to adopt and utilize appropriate, modern spring well schemes and appropriate sustainable sanitation management systems.  
  1. Project Impact
The projects’ long term impact will be the overall wellbeing of the community and can be summarized below:
  • Reduction in water borne diseases.
  • Improved health status and hygiene awareness within the target population.
  • Increased organizational and individual capacities of targeted societies staff, volunteers and the community in WASH – water, sanitation and hygiene – programming.
  • Increased access to sustainable water and sanitation services by vulnerable groups, especially women, orphans, and others.
  • Increased women’s involvement in management of water and sanitation projects and the decision making process.
  • Generation of technically sound manuals, reports, guidelines, booklets, etc. Adaptation of some of the manuals and guidelines generated by the project and sector stakeholders.
  • Increased knowledge and awareness in hygiene related information (food, water, and environment).
  • Adaptation of good hygiene practices at the household and community levels.
  • Development, adaptation and promotion of appropriate water and sanitation technology.
  • Replication of appropriate technology to other similar adjacent villages sharing the same griife.
 
  1. 3. Community Participation and target group
From the start the plan is request driven, as a result the community will take part in the whole project cycle and be included even after the accomplishment of the scheme. The whole community of the targeted villages is regarded as direct beneficiaries of the project. Household members access to safe water for drinking and sanitation will contribute to the community’s overall health and productivity status.  
  1. Project Strategy
  • Involving the rural end beneficiaries in a participatory way throughout the planning and implementation phase until the  scheme  will  be  handed  over  to  be  managed  directly by a community-elected  water user committe
  • While construction of infrastructure is essential, it is the community mobilization and education that is critical to the ultimate success and sustainability of the water schemes and health improvements.
  • Equally important, throughout the project cycle the local governments of various levels will be actively involved in planning and by close collaboration, complemented by capacity buildi This facilitates good integration of the action into their respective WaSH action plans, helps to attain a sense of ownership among them and ensures their continued support, monitoring and supervision after handover of the scheme, thus contributing to the overall sustainability of the program.
  • At the planning stage, detailed feasibility studies, construction design and socioeconomic surveys will be conducted for the scheme, community and district with stakeholder involvemen These data assist decision making and monitoring and evaluation.
 
  1. Project Linkage
At present, in the project area there is not any Governmental or NGO Organization conveyed and involved in the carrying out of potable and safe water supplies. However, as far as linkage with prior or present programme is concerned, the project can be related with a well-being and health programme which is already operating in all rural villages of the District. Hence, the linkage of local partners such as the health and education offices will have an opportunity to undertake their programme with elements to complement the Qaca Water supply Project.  
  1. Project Partner
OHO will partner with the local CBOs to implement the proposed projects activities. Further to ensure community ownership and promote sustainability of project activities, the targeted communities will be involved from the onset. Local leaders will be involved in capacity building, site clearing, head construction and the formation of the Village Water and Sanitation committee.  In addition to playing an integral role in project planning, implementation and monitoring, community members will contribute time and labour (for digging and cleaning) as well as some local materials.   Local governmental agents, namely the Community Development Officer, the Environmental Health Officer and the District Water Officer, will provide technical assistance and supervision in the areas of site selection, environmental assessment, well-digging, training, water quality, and monitoring and evaluation.   The project will thus closely monitor the fund’s tracking mechanism and will make sure income and expenses are reported to the community by the Water and Sanitation committee on a monthly basis.                                       
  1. Monitoring and Evaluation
At the beginning of the project, a baseline will be established on the various indicators. The reporting systems shall be developed for use by OHO staffs. Hence Monitoring will be done throughout the project period. Project performance and progress will be monitored through the following:
  • Project reports [monthly and quarterly]
  • Client meetings.
  • Supervision reports.
  • Discussion with influencers.
  • Training reports/ materials.
  • Group reports.
  • Self-evaluation workshop reports.
  • End of year evaluation report.
  In General
  • The monitoring and evaluation of the project takes place at two levels: the OHO, and the district Government offices/community level. It consists of three parts: performance monitoring of the OHO and local administration, process monitoring of scheme implementation and community involvement and impact evaluation of beneficiary community. The performance monitoring regularly assesses the adequacy of functions and services of the OHO, district administration, and the communities against the contractual obligations and terms of reference that has been agreed prior implementation.
  • The process monitoring provides feed back to the OHO on the efficiency and effectiveness of the methods used in project implementation. It assesses how the project is being perceived by the beneficiaries, adequacy of linkages and communication between OHO and district administration and communities.
  • The impact evaluation assesses the net impact of the project on beneficiary community particularly in terms of changes in levels of water use and consumption, use and benefits from time savings, improved personal and domestic hygiene and environmental sanitation, levels of community awareness, women’s empowerment and project sustainability, level of livelihood improvement and smoothness of teaching learning process.
  • Objectively, measurable and verifiable indicators will be developed for monitoring and evaluation of the project effectiveness. The monitoring and evaluation of schemes are managed through OHO (e.g. technical and financial audits, evaluative studies etc.) in close coordination with the local administration and the communities. Participatory techniques including qualitative and quantitative evaluation of project components with beneficiary participation will be undertaken.
 
  1. Anticipated Challenges
OHO is community based and inspired locally rooted Charity and Development Organization that have been implementing many diversified project programs in particular, rural water supplies including seasonal programs. As a result, we have developed a strong and smooth working experience and relationship with beneficiary communities, the regional political and local governance establishment existing at all levels. Thus based on this intensive experience, we do not foresee any challenges.  
  1. Sustainably
Sustainability of the implemented water supply project will largely depend on the project strategy and management principles. In principles of national water supply management strategy, the management and administration of the water supply scheme is decentralized to the beneficiary communities found at local level. Moreover, responsible public organizations and local administrative bodies also will contribute to the sustainability through providing technical support, capacity building, community mobilization etc. Hence, all necessary measures which contribute to the sustainability of a water supply scheme such as operation and maintenance, management, facility replacement, water charge and environmental protection and community sense of ownership that need to be considered are presented as follows:   The development of appropriate management for a water supply scheme should be promoted with the participation of major sector stakeholders: public, private, User Groups, and communities. The successful implementation of new management practices should also rely on:
  • appropriate contractual arrangements, and
  • appropriate legal framework and regulations.
The management of water supply systems should:
  • Have financial and management autonomy in the rural areas to achieve recovery of operation and maintenance costs;
  • Reflect transparency and accountability;
  • Outsource professional services in order to fill management capacity gaps, if needed.
 
  1. Financial Management
This project will keep and maintain full and accurate accounts for its assets, liabilities, income and expenditures in accordance with standard accounting practices and requirements of the donors and other government bodies. Payment for physical works will have approval of concerned project staffs and district source office with the involvement of steering committee.   Major Project Implementation Timeline
  1. Phase Out Strategy
The above mentioned technical, economical, and social viability factors to ensure sustainability will mainly serve as pre-conditions to the phase out/hand over mechanisms of the water supply activities. At the district level, water and health, offices, targeted beneficiary village communities are the main partners of the project. After completion of all planned activities such as construction of the water supply scheme and hygiene and sanitation and building the management capacity of the community, all project components will formally be handed over to the Woreda water, health and the community. The respected Woreda offices will assign the personnel required to provide the expected services to the target population. OHO keeps recording all lessons learned during the implementation of the entire project and disseminates it to all local stakeholders in meeting, workshop and panel discussions. In addition to this, the project phase out will be announced by national TV, radio and newspaper of the country soon after the inauguration ceremony to be held with the presence of invited Federal and local Government officials, local elders, and Religious leaders.   Cost Breakdown for the construction of One Modern Standard Spring water well Budget Breakdown   Table 1  
Item No. Description Work Unit Qty Rate  Total Amount £
1 Earth Work
1.1. Site clearing to an average depth of 30cm to remove top soil M2 25 £0.31 £7.75
1.2. Excavation for Modern Box floor area, wing walls strip foundation & retaining walls M3 10 £1.42 £14.20
1.3. Back fill work around the external faces of the foundation wall with approved excavated material from the site M3 10 £4.74. £47.45
1.4. Spread and cart away surplus excavated material from the site to adjacent not less than 100m to spoil tips M3 5 £4.74. £23.72
1.5. Filling the modern eye area with clean and graded river gravel for filter of approved required size arranged M3 4.5 £14.23 £64.06
1.6. Placing 20cm thick cement pointed one pitch cover above graded gravel to protect the  modern and for hygiene M2 8 £4.74 £37.96
A.    Sub Total £195.14
2 Masonry Work
2.1. Construction of 50cm thick masonry wall for elevation of 25cm above ground for wing wall and modern box wall with cement mortar of 1-3 as per the design drawing M3 12 £37.96 £455.55
2.1. Construction of 25cm retaining wall up stream M3 3 £37.96 £113.88
2.2. 20cm tick pointed to protect hygiene and the structure. M3 6 36.38 218.28
 B. Sub Total £787.71
3 Concrete Work
3.1. Construction of reinforced concrete collection box adjacent to modern Eye to collect filtered water and guide to the out let Drainage over flaw system including all supply of pipes fitting &control valves Ls 1 £31.63 £31.63
3.2. Casting 10cm tick mass concrete above hard core to cover and protect the modern eye. M2 15 £47.45 £711.80
3.3. Construction of 15cm thick reinforced concrete roof slab with manhole opening of 60cmx60cm left open M3 0.6 £72.76 £43.65
3.4. Construction of manhole cover made of reinforced concrete having a thickness 5cm and 75x75cm dimension & plastered smooth. No 1 £37.96 £37.96
3.5. Plastering the internal wall surface of the modern box wing walls with 30mm thick cement mortar mix1;3 M2 35 £6.64 £232.52
3.6 Pointing all the external face of exposed masonry wall M2 20 £4.74 £94.90
3.7. Provide cut & fix in positions sawn wooden from work or equivalent properly erected and strutted with tight joint not to bleed. M2 10 £4.74 £47.45
3.8. Provide cut, bend &fix reinforcement bar Diameter of 10mm placed at 150mm c/c for mesh wall and for roof slab as per the drawing. Kg 30 £0.94 £28.47
 C. Sub Total £1,228.38
4 Pipe Work
Supply and install all necessary class” pipes and Fittings (for out let, drainage & cover flow system) with all necessary gate valve & control. Ls 1 £50.61 £50.61
 D. Sub Total £50.61
5  Project Administration Cost
5.1 Fuel Littre 270 £0.52 £141.03
5.2 Monitoring and Evaluation team 1 £65.29 £65.29
5.3 Training people 20 £65.29 £65.29
5.4 Name plate No. 1 £81.61 £81.61
5.5 Documentation Lump sum £50.00
E. Sub Total Project Cost £403.22
Grand TOTAL £2,665.00
22nd
Feb
2016

Five villages on the Pemba Islands, Tanzania need your help to store fresh, clean water


LFCT supporters, please donate to this project today and provide over 1,000 people with a vital water supply

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Shamiani Island lies in the southern region of Pemba, Tanzania. The island has a total of nine villages, made up of 233 families or 2,025 individual residents including the elderly, youth and children. The LFCT has already supported clean water provision to four of these villages; Mgoli, Lakolikoje, Jambonia and Mgongeni. With the completion of the project of the four villages, residents of the villages can enjoy clean and safe water provision. However, the remaining five villages on Shamiani still lack access to safe water. These villages are Mkwajuni, Chotara, Mji Mpya, Pitanazako and Kaskazini. These villages have a population of 1,038. At present, water is fetched from wells, but these wells are old and insufficient and rising sea levels mean saline intrusion is a key problem. The wells are not deep enough and often dry up during drought – they are far from adequate. The villages do have access to tap water from a supply system that travel undersea from Kengeja. However, this tap system only operates once a week, usually at night. As such, villagers are forced to travel to neighbouring villages to search for fresh water.   How far do you have to travel to the nearest tap, can you guarantee it will work? Could you imagine not knowing when and if you water supply will be running? How would you plan for drinking, cooking and bathing?   In Tanzania only 56% of the population have access to an improved water source. A lack of clean water is just one of the basic necessities these villages are currently without access to. Without easy access to clean water, disease and illness are daily occurrences and as the burden for water collection lies with women, they are forced to travel great distances in search of a suitable water supply, reducing their ability to further the household income, farm, fish, undertake education or training. Furthermore, when pregnant or ill, the daily, extended journey for water becomes a further strain on women’s lives, health and dignity.   The villagers are appealing to the LFCT to help provide them with water storage tanks in order to collect and store piped water in a sanitary condition for use at all times of the day and night, not just when the tap is in operation. The villagers have agreed to help with manual labour involved in the project, in particular the collection and distribution of sand and stones. Having clean water will open up many economic opportunities for the villagers. Livelihoods include fishing, for which the island is famous, farming crops such as rice, coconuts, bananas, cloves and cassava and increasingly, the tourism sector, which is booming in nearby Zanzibar.   LFCT supporters, please help support this vital project today and restore health and dignity to five villages for under £1 per head. Your donation can help cease the suffering and barriers faced by these five villages to access fresh and clean water.   Thank you.   Budget:
NO ITEM UNITS QUANTITY UNIT COST TOTAL COST (TSHS)
1.1 Simtank (Poly tank) five thousand litres of water each. Pcs 10 TZS 1,550,000.00 15,500,000.00
1.2 IPS Tank Connector ¾” Pcs 10 TZS 7,500.00 75,000.00
1.3 IPS Pipe ¾” Pcs 18 TZS 32,000.00 576,000.00
1.4 IPS Nipple ¾” Pcs 20 TZS 3,500.00 70,000.00
1.5 IPS  Union Box  ¾” Pcs 35 TZS 3,500.00 122,500.00
1.6 IPS  Gate Valve ¾” Pcs 10 TZS 16,000.00 160,000.00
1.7 Thread Tape Pcs 20 TZS 1,000.00 20,000.00
1.8 IPS Elbow Connector ¾” Pcs 30 TZS 4,500.00 135,000.00
1.9 Boyer ¾” Pcs 10 TZS 28,000.00 280,000.00
1.1 IPS  Socket  ¾” Pcs 23 TZS 3,500.00 80,500.00
1.11 IPS Reducing Socket 11/2 Pcs 24 TZS 4,500.00 108,000.00
1.12 Male Connector Pcs 25 TZS 4,500.00 112,500.00
1.13 IPS Tee Connector Pcs 20 TZS 4,500.00 90,000.00
1.14 Saddle Pcs 5 TZS 7,000.00 35,000.00
1.15 Polthyne Pipe HDPE Class C ¾” Rolls 5 TZS 320,000.00 1,600,000.00
1.16 Bib Tape Pcs 5 TZS 12,500.00 62,500.00
1.17 Clips Pcs 20 TZS 300.00 6,000.00
1.18 Stopcock Pcs 10 TZS 12,500.00 125,000.00
1.19 Cement for construction of 5 small elevated water tank Pkts 170 TZS 18,000.00 3,060,000.00
1.2 Transport  of materials Trips 6 TZS 270,000.00 1,620,000.00
1.21 Technical labour Support for construction of 5 small elevated water tank TZS 450,000.00 2,250,000.00
1.22 Reinforcement D12 for construction of 5 small elevated water tanks Pcs 85 TZS 19,500.00 1,657,500.00
1.23 Technical labour support for joining water tank and supply TZS 270,000.00 1,350,000.00
1.24 Wood and Binding Wire 676,200.00
1.25 Sign Boards 945,000.00
1.26 Communication and follow up 280,000.00
 TOTAL 30,996,700.00
  Approx. US$      14,760.00/ £GBP 10,245 Phase ONE        3 villages           US$ 9,000 Phase TWO       2 villages           US$ 5,760 As requested by LFCT, three villages be done followed by the remaining two. Signed: My Hameed Y Sheriff, Tanzania Volunteer
26th
Feb
2016

Appeal: Fresh water for three villages of Jobwe, Sanani and Anjaani in Pemba. Appeal for much needed water pump to replace failed one.


Pemba1 Pemba2 Pemba3 A project to provide water to the three villages of Jobwe, Sanani and Anjaani in Pemba was started on 05.2015 and completed on 05.16.2015. The project was implemented and was providing fresh water 560 families across the three villages, totalling 9,015 inhabitants. The benefits were immediate to the residents, they had clean and safe water to fulfil their every need. The water project consisted of the installation of 66 drainage canals, 56 for the regular use by residents and 10 canals for the mosques.   The villages are extremely rural and water supplies beforehand had been non-existent in the villages themselves. LFCT’s local partner, PEDEO assisted the villagers to install a water pump to be shared by all three villagers and by installing pipes and water storage tanks on a high tower, completed the project with a steady flow of water to all three villages.   The water pump was functioning with good capacity until November 2015. Unfortunately the pump procured was of poor quality and small capacity. PEDEO and the villagers had saved up hard to pay for a pump and bought the best one they could procure, which was unfortunately too poor in quality for the large task at hand – providing water for three villages. The pump was overstretched for what its capacity could achieve and caused irreparable damage to itself through overuse use. After consulting a mechanic the pump cannot be repaired.   The villages are without clean water once more and are devastated. They are afraid to get sick and for their children to have diarrhoea. They are afraid of time away from education and income generation. They are worried and are struggling to rest at night for the worry if fresh water will ever be restored once again.   The only option is to procure two new pumps that will have a great capacity and not be overstretched. The total cost will be Tanzanian Shilling 2,800,000.00/£928.00  
BUDGET FOR PUMP AND IT’S INSTALATION
No Description Quantity Unit Price TOTAL
1 Pump 1 28,000,000.00  28,000,000.00
2 Installation         70,000.00
3 Transport         20,000.00
TOTAL    2,890,000.00
GB Pounds               928.00
US Dollars           1,295.55
    PEDEO and the three villages are appealing for the help of LFCT supporters for assistance in providing the correct water pumps so that they can have fresh, clean, life bringing water once again.  
7th
Mar
2016

Appeal for safe water supplies to rural villages in Pakistan – please donate today valued LFCT supporters


March 2016

 appeal 2 appeal 3appeal 1

In (1000’s), 68,666 people till lack access to improved sanitation and 16,096 still lack access to improved sources of water across Pakistan. The LFCT needs your help to provide ten more schemes across rural Pakistan between March and May 2016.   In the Thar Desert region of Pakistan, inhabitants are very poor and have to walk for miles to fetch water by hand, often carrying on their heads or if they are lucky, using a donkey or camel. When they reach the source of water there is no guarantee it won’t be contaminated or dried up. Water is fetched by hand from these remote locations.   Installing a hand pump will bring great relief, making it much easier to fetch water and will save time and effort. It will be especially high impact for the women in the villages who are often the ones tasked with fetching water, a daily and gruelling task.   Hand pumps are quick and easy to install and relatively cheap, although this is a cost the poor inhabitants of the localities listed below still cannot afford. The LFCT will work with its local partner in Pakistan to provide the technical assistance and financial support to install 10 hand pumps by May 2016.   The LFCT is appealing for the assistance of its dedicated supporters and benefactors to help realise these 10 hand pumps. Please donate generously to this cause and help to provide not only water, but health, dignity and time also.   Thank you very much.  
No Project Cost  Cost in GB£
1 Hand pump in Thar desert’s farthest district Islamkot, where people have to travel one to two Kms to get water. Here water is struck at 110 to 150 feet. PKR 66,000.00 £442.15
2 Hand pump in Thar desert’s farthest district Islamkot, where people have to travel one to two Kms to get water. Here water is struck at 110 to 150 feet. PKR 66,000.00 £442.15
3 Water pumping scheme Jalyari Kohala. Here water is available in a water spring, this will be pumped with the help of electric pump to 14 houses on the ridge. It will provide water to about 95 people. Women have to walk on steep path to reach this spring. PKR 40,000.00 £267.95
4 Water supply scheme Jalyari- Galli Khiala. Through this scheme water will be provided to 6 houses on the mountains.  Water will be pumped to the houses high on the mountain from a water spring down below. It will serve needs of 30 people. PKR 38,000.00 £254.55
5 Water supply scheme Phalla. Water well is available in this locality about 750 meters from 11 houses comprising of 70people. They have to walk on mountain slippery track daily to get water. This will alleviate sufferings of these people. PKR 45,000.00 £301.45
6 Water supply scheme Apparlam – Lora.  Here also water is available down below from the village. Water will be pumped to the houses with the help of electric pump. There are 16 houses in this location comprising of about 90 people. PKR 35,000.00 £234.45
7 Water supply scheme Nakyal- Lora.  This place is adjacent to main town but is not having access to clean water. It comprises of 12 houses with 60 people living there. Here water will be pumped from water point down below the village at a distance of 1500 feet. PKR 40,000.00 £267.95
8 Water supply scheme Pattan piran.  Water is available here 1200 feet below the village. Women have to walk on hilly track to fetch water daily. The locality comprises of 18 houses with 100 people. Water will be pumped to the village with the help of electric pump and pipe. PKR 40,000.00 £267.95
9 Water supply scheme Khaitran. This is small village on a hillock. It comprises of 12 houses with 65 people living there. There source of water is a water pit in the valley. This is at a distance of 1500 feet down the slopes. Water will be pumped to them with the help of a motor and pipes. PKR 40,000.00 £267.95
10 Water supply scheme Pathani. This locality is also situated on a hill ridge. It has about 25 houses comprising of 150 people. Water will be pumped to them from a water bore that is available at a distance of 1800 feet away down below the ridge. PKR 48,000.00 £321.55
Total Expenditure PKR 458,000.00 £3,068.10
Spent more last time PKR 15,081.00 £101.05
Total to be sent. PKR 473,081.00 £3,169.15
8th
Mar
2016

For every two LIFESAVER Bottles that the LFCT purchases, another one will be donated by the manufacturer. Read more about this great new partnership below! DEAR LFCT Donors; Donate GB£ 180.00 towards one bottle and get Gala Dinner ticket as Compliment


ethiopia 1ethiopia 2ethiopia 3 The LFCT has partnered up with Icon Lifesaver to run a special appeal that is being launched ahead of the LFCT annual Gala on 7th May. LFCT has already purchased over 405 water purification systems – jerry cans, cubes and a C2 which are under shipment to Iraq imminently to equip marshlands villagers. LIFESAVER water purification equipment is used by OXFAM, Save the Children, The British Red Cross and endorsed by the UK Department for International Development (DFID). LIFESAVER technology is the world’s first all-in-one portable ultra-filtration system that removes all viruses, bacteria, cysts, parasites, fungi and all other microbiological waterborne pathogens without the need for chemicals, power or UV light. The products are simple and intuitive to use with failsafe technology that filters out even the smallest harmful pathogens.   Please help the LFCT to provide as many LIFESAVER Bottles as possible to families in spate need today. Support this appeal today and each time you turn on the tap, boil the kettle or wash your clothes, think of those you have also helped to gain access to safe, clean and keep their families healthy and happy.   Each LIFESAVER Bottle will cost £120, just £0.02 per lire of clean, bacteria free water. For every two Bottles the LFCT are able to purchase, LIFESAVER will donate one further one to our communities.   The bottle is capable of delivering up to 4,000 litres of clean water for individual use. The LIFESAVER Bottle holds up to 750ml at any one time. The LIFESAVER Bottle was designed to store and carry dirty water, once water is cleaned there is risk of recontamination. With the bottle, just filter water when you want to drink it. No need for bad tasting chemicals such as chlorine or chlorine dioxide.   The LFCT have identified Iraq, Ethiopia and Malawi amongst the communities it works with where clean, safe water is desperately needed. Here is a snapshot of the water epidemic in these three countries;   Ethiopia: If you live in Ethiopia, you are likely to die nearly 20 years earlier that you would in the UK, largely down to preventable disease, much of which, has a link to the availability of adequate safe water supplies.  In rural Ethiopia, women and children can walk for anything up to six hours in search of water. This water is collected from open, unprotected ponds, often shared with animals. This source of water is vulnerable to contamination as rain water washes waste from the surrounding area into the shallow pond. This water is collected and drunk by families, polluting their bodies with numerous bacteria and pathogens and causing a whole host of otherwise avoidable illness.    Iraq: The marshlands in Iraq are a beautiful oasis of nature with an abundance of water. However, as well as bringing life to nature, this water poses a grave danger for the Marshlands human residents, bringing disease, ill health and even death. The marshlands are largely unserved by NGOs and the government, meaning daily life without even the most basic amenities for its residents. The LFCT has a partnership with a local NGO in the Central Marshes in the district of Chabaish, where several villages are scattered. This district is located 156 km east of the province of Nasiriyah, and is about 600 km south of the province of Karbala. The villages’ residents live in small huts (on average two metres wide, six metres long and three metres high) made of reed plants and navigate the marshes by small boats. Nestled together in tight knit communities, these houses lack running water, electricity or latrines. The families here are extremely poor but choose and enjoy living in the traditional way their ancestors have done for decades. However, tradition is putting their health at risk as residents rely on the marsh water not only for their livelihoods but to drink, cook, clean and wash with. In Iraq, only 86.3% of the population have access to safe, clean water (WASHWatch, 2015), the rest rely on dirty, contaminated sources, including water directly form the marshes themselves, home to buffalo who swim, drink  and defecate in the water and never far from  contamination from human faeces or wastewater either.   In Malawi, currently 692,000 people need to gain access to safe, clean water sources each year for the country to have 100% of its population using an improved water sources by 2030. Most of Malawi’s population live in rural areas, making access to safe water a sizeable issue. Reliable access is a huge problem here, with hand pumps frequently breaking and needing replacing faster than they can be repaired. This means communities often resort back to open, unprotected sources of water, where they are susceptible to picking up diseases and pathogens that could even be fatal.   However, these communities can have access to safe water, with your help. Please buy a LIFESAVER Bottle or two today and help the LFCT to get these over to the communities that need them the most. Remember, for every two bottle we purchase, Icon Lifesaver will generously donate one more.   Thank you.
16th
Mar
2016

Hawraa and Abbas mourn their father and worry about their future – but you could help the LFCT change that


March 2016

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The LFCT’s Orphan support scheme, means that individual orphans receive £30 per month which provides vital support for a more comfortable life where children can focus on getting their education and do not have to worry about where their next meal comes from. No one has been spared from the effects of violence and war in Iraq, and since 2003 the number of orphaned children in the country has escalated into a humanitarian crisis. Recognised as a conservative estimate, widespread surveys report this number to be between 800,000 to a million children (BBC, 2012), however many agencies and NGOs believe the reality to be much higher, at around three million.   The story this month is of Hawraa and Abbas. Hawraa, 11 and her brother, Abbas, aged 9 are orphans who are living in Kerbala with their mother and their grandfather; they lost their father just four months ago. They are so sad because of losing their father.   Their father was born in Kerbala in 1971. He was working with popular mobilization (AlHashid Al-Shaabi) in Anbar and after he returned back from the battle for some days of rest, he had a heart attack. His family transferred him to hospital but unfortunately he died there.   The widow is also sad for losing her husband and now the responsibility has become much greater on her. The widow’s family have assisted their daughter through the past months but this will not continue for much longer as they themselves are poor.   Hawraa and Abbas orphans are attending school regularly; Hawraa in the 5th class in the primary school and Abbas in the 3rd class primary school. Both of them are doing well in their studying. By enrolling on the LFCT orphan support programme they are much more likely to stay in education and have a brighter future. They will not have to support their mother by becoming working children.   Without support it is likely the children would have had to drop out of school and help their mother find an income for the family, it simply would not have been viable to send the children to school. The LFCT is able to support this family, but there are many more like them in terrible situations, due to no fault of their own. It costs just £30 to support an orphan for a whole month – that is just £1 per day. Please support the LFCT’s flagship programme today and provide an orphan with all the support they need to get a great start in life.   Signed by: Alaa Tareq Al Najjar and Sister Israa Razzaq Al Sikafi
1st
Apr
2016

Education Appeal for Mohamed Banat from Palestine


Palestine1   In the year 1948 (Nakba), all Palestinians from the West Bank of Palestine were forced out of their homeland by the Israeli Zionist regime and ever since, they have been living in refugee camps in Palestine, in all the neighbouring Arab countries and worldwide.   Mr Mohamed Banat is from a Palestinian refugee family consisting of 10 people.  They depend heavily on donations from UNRWA for their living which gets distributed every three months and which consists of 25 kg of flour for three persons included some sugar, rice and oil.   Mohamed has been working as a teacher in a government schools which belong to the Palestinian National Authority in Palestine, but his salary is not enough for his family. He earns about 2300.00 NIS shekels and all of it is spent towards his MA studies.   His father is 80 years of age and is suffering from hypertension, and diabetes. His older brother Ibrahim is mentally ill, has been suffering from epilepsy since his birth. His Uncle Ahmad has psychological problems and has to take a lot of medication.   The main problem they are facing is his brother Khaled who is also psychologically ill since 1986. He has four children and he too depends for his living on the donations from UNRWA.   The cost of the expensive medication for both the uncle and the brother makes their financial situation extremely difficult.   Mohamed is the only working member in the family. He is very interested in completing his PHD studies in order to pursue his ambition and to improve the financial situation of his family in the future.   He has been granted admission in Universidad de Granada, in Spain.   The monthly expenses are as follows:  
1. Accommodation for a single room € 300.00
2. Utility bills  €  80.00
3. Transport  €  80.00
4. Photocopies for the PHD  €  50.00
5. Food €  300.00
Total €  810.00
  Dear LFT donors: €810.00 is a sum that many employees in the developed world earn in one or two days. For brother Mohamed, it represents his educational future for a whole year, and. the future of the Banat family. It will be he who will have to care for his father, uncle and brother and the children. Please, donate generously. Many more families and children in similar situations wait for assistance.     To support the LFT’s Ramadhan Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone.   To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070 To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070 To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070 To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070   The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust, is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving.   In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation.   From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes.   Ijaza: 
  • The Lady Fatemah Trust has been granted Ijaaza by Ayatollah al-Uzma Seyed Ali Seestani to collect Khums money. Please remember we operate on the basis of ZERO% administration costs, so every penny you give goes directly to those in need.
  Comfort Aid and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Comfort Aid in the US, info@comfortaid.org similar to IHS in Ottawa, ihs@primus.ca which allows donors to donate to LFT through these organizations gaining tax benefits. Please contact them for further information. We would sincerely like to thank both Comfort Aid and Islamic Humanitarian Service.
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.
  To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.webstar.co.uk/lft/hsbc/donate.php .   Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 28% if you are a UK taxpayer.   Thank you, as always for all your generosity and support.  
8th
Apr
2016

The Renovation of the Plumbing System at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi ~ PHASE 5a: Renovation of the female ablution block on the TB ward LFCT Donors.


April 2016 LFCT Donors. PLEASE Donate Generously towards this project MA 1 MA2 MA3   Project Objective To renovate the female ablution block on the TB wards at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, (QECH) Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections to post female TB patients. As TB patients typically spend several months at Queens, the conditions of the toilet and shower facilities is particularly important  as they are essential for better care and for the dignity of the patients and guardians who care for them.   The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof.   Project Narrative Every day in Queen’s hospital there are between 70 to 80 TB patients- a typical stay is for 2 months but this can increase when patients develop resistance to the drugs. TB patient very often also have secondary infections such as pneumonia. The conditions of the toilet and shower facilities is of utmost importance as TB is an infectious disease. QECH was built in 1958 and at the time was considered the pinnacle of hospital facilities in Malawi. Today, nearly 60 years later, the buildings are cramped, owing not only to the HIV epidemic but also to an approximately 5-fold increase in Malawi’s population since 1958.  The wards are therefore no longer able to meet the needs of sick patients, let alone their guardians and families, or indeed the medical staff that work there. Statistics reveal the current problem of overcrowding with, for example, the 50-bed women’s ward regularly housing over 70 patients, and sometimes over 100. This overcrowding results in mattresses being placed on the floor between beds and even in corridors. In addition, nursing & medical staff regularly work under extremely difficult circumstances with very limited resources.   QECH is also the major clinical teaching site for Malawi’s only medical school, with over 100 medical students based at QECH each day during the academic year. The TB ward is used as a training place for the for the College of Medicine student doctors in Malawi. ChiraFund believes that the creation of a healthier, cleaner and more dignified environment for patients also creates a better learning environment for students.  These graduates are Malawi’s newest doctors and midwives – who will take their experience to district hospitals and health centres throughout the country. We also believe that if they learn their clinical practice in a positive, patient-supportive environment, they will translate this to wherever they work elsewhere in Malawi.    The importance of creating the conditions within which sick patients can be cared for in suitable and comfortable surroundings, as well as accommodating the guardians and families who assist with their care, has long been recognised.   After several decades of heavy utilisation, the physical condition of the plumbing system has deteriorated to an unusable state with blocked sewage systems, broken and leaking pipes, unsuitable toilets, broken showers. The current sewage system is unable to cope with the high volume of patients and guardians currently using them. This has led to rats and other vermin taking residence near the wards.   While routine maintenance and ad hoc repairs works have been carried out over the years, the present conditions of the plumbing system present significant infection control risks and compromise the care and dignity of the patients. Nosocomial illness – due to disease-causing organisms spreading between individuals in hospital – is an important risk in crowded wards such as these, for example, women post-partum are particularly susceptible to infections.   The risk of acquiring a nosocomial infection is highest in each ward’s toilet and ablutions block, where up to 200 people share the same seats, sinks, taps, showers and towels.  They also share the same floor – on which most walk bare-foot. The plumbing system, especially the toilet and sink facilities need frequent renovation, as well as thorough and regular cleaning.   At present we recognise that without a complete overhaul, the now ageing system is impossible to clean adequately and are a constant health hazard.  We would like to renovate these with good-quality components and to a design that will allow effective ventilation and efficient cleaning     Project Work plan and Timeline-PHASE 5a The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof of the female toilets at the TB ward. The work will commence on Monday 11h of April and will be completed Friday 22ndth of April.   Project Budget details and breakdown The total proposed budget is MK 2,218,664.45 (£2,346.00 at exchange rate 06/04/2016)  
Quotation for Female Toilet in the TB Ward
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi ~ PHASE 5a: Renovation of the female ablution block on the TB ward
Item Quantity Rate Amount KK GB£
Flush master toilet 3    96,462.00 289,386.00   305.95
Replace piping    50,000.00        50,000.00     52.85
Replace squats pan 2   179,000.00      358,000.00   378.50
Nu-lite ceiling and painting   102,879.00      102,879.00   108.75
Cornices 10      3,500.00        35,000.00     37.00
Metal door frames complete with painting 6   124,308.00      745,848.00   788.55
Tiling   204,120.00      204,120.00   215.80
Shower Rose 3    13,110.00        39,330.00     41.60
Wash Hand Basin complete with taps 1    22,680.00        22,680.00     24.00
Replace taps to match 3    13,230.00        39,690.00     41.95
Replace sphere fitting with bulbs 5      3,500.00        17,500.00     18.50
SUB TOTAL   1,904,433.00 2,013.45
ADD 16.5% VAT      314,231.45     332.22
GRAND TOTAL   2,218,664.45   2,345.67
  Technical capacity to deliver the project Over the past ten years, ChiraFund have been involved in many projects at QECH. Some examples of projects our charities have successfully managed in the past include:
  • Complete refurbishment of the TB ward with the aid of a 20 million kwacha grant from the National Bank of Malawi;
  • Refurbishment of ablution blocks on Male and Female ward with the aid of grant funding from Irish Aid;
  • The building of guardian shelters and washing facilities with funds raised from QECH doctors;
  • Renovation of the toilet and shower facilities in dermatology ward with funds raised in UK through individual fundraising, and;
  • The provision of additional medicines, bandages, toilet paper with funds from Charity Advisory Trust UK.
For this project, we secured three quotations from building contractors: Mwanic Building Contractors,, Kamungu Construction and Elite Construction.   After interviews and project site visits, the contract will be awarded to Mwanic Building Contactors based on price and ability to do the job. We will use the same approach as we used for the successful renovation of the ablution blocks including:
  • The signing of a contract between ChiraFund and the contractor designed to ensure quality of service and guarantees on the materials;
  • The overseeing of the renovations on a daily basis by ChiraFund project manager George Musowa and ChiraFund coordinator Alice Taylor;
  • Regular monitoring and evaluation by ChiraFund in collaboration with the onsite project manager from the construction company, and;
  • Ensuring the sustainably of the project by regular liaising with hospital administration on-site.
Controls to ensure satisfactory financial management and effective oversight of project resources ChiraFund have very strict financial policies and procedures in place including two signatories on all cheques, bank withdrawals and deposits. All expenditure has to be pre-approved by the trustees and in line with agreed spending for the financial year.   In addition, AMG Global-Certified Global Accountants and Business Advisors provide ChiraFund with accountancy and auditing services and provide an annual check and audit.   All funds donated are receipted and a report documenting and explaining how funds were spent is provided at the end of the project.   All project resources quoted by the contractor, are double checked to be of the standard (make, no, type) agreed by Alice Taylor (co-ordinator ChiraFund) and George Musowa (project manager ChiraFund).   Consultation ChiraFund have consulted with and received permission from QECH hospital management to proceed with this work. We have consulted with ward sisters from each ward; Mr Chimphamba (Chief Plumber QECH_), Mr. Ndovi (Quantity Surveyor), Mr. Mhango (Chief Hospital Administrator) as well as numerous doctors around the hospital including Dr. Bonongwe (Head of Obstetrics), Dr. Mallewa (Head of Medical Wards), Dr. Dube (Head of Paediatrics), Dr. Masambe (Head Oncology) Dr. Huwa (Head of Palliative Care), Dr. Kuweruza (Head of Dental) and a number of guardians and patients.   Sustainability of the project ChiraFund are in ongoing discussions with the hospital administration to ensure the sustainability of the work we do. Hospital Administration has agreed to;
  • Strengthen routine inspection so that problems are identified early and preventive maintenance in place;
  • Increase security in the wards by increasing the numbers of hired guards
  • Provision of staff IDs to maintenance team who go and work in various wards. This will filter fake artisan from the streets who are vandalizing the plumbing equipment;
  • Extend the sourced out cleaning services to wards like Paediatrics and advise them on the type of equipment that they should use in a hospital set up, and;
  • Intensify Health Education talks to guardians and patients on the proper use of ablution facilities.
Reporting and acknowledgement We can provide a mid-term review and a more extensive project outcomes report upon completion with receipts, pictures etc.   We can place a prominent plaque or any other such acknowledgment desired, at the hospital in recognition of the donation from the LFCT.   Professor Alice Taylor (PhD) Coordinator ChiraFund   On behalf of Professor Malcolm Molyneux-Chairperson ChiraFund UK Dr. Jane Mallewa-Chairperson ChiraFund Malawi      
13th
Apr
2016

The Vocational School at Imam Sadr Foundation, Tyre, Lebanon


Dear LFCT Donors, Please donate Generously April 2016 L1 L2 In the heart of the city of Tyre, Imam Sadr Foundation (ISF) was founded and built by Sayyed Mussa Al-Sadr in the year 1962. Sayyed Al-Sadr’s ultimate aim was to empower women in South Lebanon. In that view, ISF has grown to become a non-profit organization that provides community services in fields of education, health, training, and culture. The cultural compound in Tyre includes an orphanage, an elementary school, a training centre, a restaurant, a nursing institute, and a vocational school. The vocational school, Al-Afak Institute for Development, offers young women the chance to earn a notable education that changes their lives. Because most girls admitted at the institute come from underprivileged families, they depend on the funding of generous philanthropists and organizations.   The Institute offers various degrees in two different domains: Accelerated Vocational Training Programs (founded in 1998) and Social Work Department (founded in 2003). The first program has nine-month training courses in a variety of fields, including secretarial studies, health services, child services, cosmetology, landscaping, hospitality management, photography and videography (with 1544 female graduates to this day). The program’s core purpose is based on Imam As-Sadr’s statement that “we should provide the proper climate for the development of women’s capacities to the service of society.” The program is characterized by its responsiveness to job market demands and the aspirations and capacities of beneficiaries through the wide range of specialties it offers. That goes beyond simply building the practical skills pertaining to the profession to include a variety of religious, social, and cultural courses.   The Social Work department grants the Professional Brevet (BP) and Technical Baccalaureate (BT) diplomas. This specialty is one of its kind in Lebanon and was accredited by the Vocational and Technical Education Directorate-General. The program trains female social workers to work with groups and individuals of all ages (children, adults, youths, or handicapped) towards promoting their participation in social life and improving their living and working conditions. Therefore, social workers contribute to enhancing the intellectual, cultural, and behavioural aspects of the community. The high rate of enrolment in the program reveals the thirst of the community for such services. From a mere 9 candidates joining the program in 2004, the number soared to 76 in 2007, to 90 students in 2010, and to 147 in 2016.   BUDGET  
VOCATIONAL  STUDENTS (2015-2016 – IMAM SADR FOUNDATION (TYRE – SOUTH LEBANON)
No Name Nature of Course Full Year TOTAL FEES ISF’s Share 2015-2016 LFT’s Share 2015-2016 SEMESTER 1 LFCT SEMESTER 2 LFCT
1 Israa khalil BT3 $2,015.00 $800.00 $1,215.00 $607.50 $607.50
2 Sokayna Al Husseini BT3 $2,015.00 $800.00 $1,215.00 $607.50 $607.50
3 Zahraa Hamadi BT1 $2,015.00 $800.00 $1,215.00 $607.50 $607.50
TOTAL STUDENTS (vocational) $6,045.00 $2,400.00 $3,645.00 $1,822.50 $1,822.50
  The Lady Fatemah Charity Trust (LFCT) sponsors some of our orphan and social cases students to continue their education and afford decent living to their families. Some testimonies from graduated students’ success stories:
  • Noura Habes (Photography Graduate 2015) tried to hide her economic situation at the beginning of the year. After filling her personal profile, it turned out she was an orphan—her father had died when she was a child—and the family did not have any supporter. She was looking for a technical major that allows her to work immediately to help provide for her family. Noura was passionate about drawing and photography since she was a little girl. Lady Fatima Charity Trust was her gate to turn dreams into reality and study what she found herself in. Noura now works at a studio and as a freelance photographer.”
 
  • Zahraa Ameen (Social Animation Graduate 2015) was a hardworking, ambitious student for five years at the institute. Lady Fatehma Charity Trust contributed to giving her a fruitful education. Her successful journey did not stop when she graduated. She is currently pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in Childhood Education at the respectable Lebanese International University (LIU). She chose a major related to her studies at school and one that she desires to excel at.”
  Signed by: Mrs Khadijeh WEHBEH, Director of Vocational Institute    
3rd
May
2016

Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children (ASDC) Appeals to the Lady Fatemah (A.S.) Charitable Trust (LFCT) For Empowering Deaf Women and Men and other Marginalized and Needy Women in the Gaza Strip through Livelihood Opportunities


April 2016 pe1 pe2 pe3 Brief Information about Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children:   Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children was established in 1992 by women health-care and education professionals in order to help deaf and hearing impaired persons in the Gaza Strip have their chance in life through education, rehabilitation, and job training and employment.    From its establishment as a small school for the deaf serving 27 pupils in 1992, Atfaluna now serves more than 20,000 persons with hearing loss and their families annually and is the main referral and resource center for community-based rehabilitation centers, UNRWA, the Ministry of Health, and other non-governmental and private sector service providers in the Gaza Strip.  The Society runs a school for 300 deaf children, speech therapy and audiology outpatient clinics, vocational training and income generation programs for deaf adults, and early intervention program.   Background:   The Gaza Strip has been suffering the most severe economic and social conditions since 1967. The long harsh economic siege on the Gaza Strip which was imposed collectively on the Gaza Strip population has left 80% of the people food aid dependent and 60% unemployed. According to Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS), the poverty rate among Palestinians is 25.8% with 38.8% in the Gaza Strip. According to the Risk Assessment Report 2013, the overall economic outlook is bleak. The growth of the economy is negatively related to restrictions on mobility, the withholding of taxes, lower donor aid. Most sectors are on the verge of collapsing because of the current shortages of imports, fuel supplies and frequent electricity blackouts. International aid agencies and UN organizations such as UNRWA are playing a major role in providing health and education services to more than 70% of the population.   Needs Statement:   According to the results of the disability survey conducted by PCBS in 2011, about 113,000 persons have disabilities in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. These figures are considered to be among the highest ratios in the world due to health, genetic, social, political, and environmental. PwDs still face extreme social, economic, and political levels of inequality and discrimination, contributing to their underdevelopment, marginalization, unequal access to resources and lack of services provision.   Many deaf persons in the Gaza Strip lack academic, professional/vocational, or social skills to enable them to seek employment.  Only a small number of deaf persons are actually employed.  Women with disabilities, particularly deaf women, who lack of formal education or literacy skills, or have extremely demanding home responsibilities find it almost impossible to help themselves and their children, yet the responsibility most often falls upon them to provide for their families in the absence of or incapability of a male wage-earner.   Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children is seeking the generous assistance of the Lady Fatemah (A.S.) Charitable Trust in supporting deaf women and men, and also some of the most marginalized and needy women in the Gaza Strip to provide for their own needs and those of their families, improve their self-esteem, and enable them to be productive members of the community in which they live.   The proposed project is linked to Atfaluna’s income-generation program which produces and markets Palestinian crafts made by deaf men and women. It intends to support the economic empowerment and social protection of 30 deaf women and men and other marginalized and needy women through maintaining their center-based job opportunities in the fields of traditional embroidery, sewing, pottery making, cooking and baking, carpentry, and painting on wood as follow:  
Work Field No. of Contracts/ Beneficiaries
Sewing 6
Traditional Palestinian embroidery 6
Culinary Arts 4
Pottery Production and Painting on Ceramics 4
Painting on wood 4
Carpentry 6
Total 30
 
Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children – Appeal to the Lady Fatemah (A.S.) Charitable Trust (LFCT)
For Empowering Deaf Women and Men and other Marginalized and Needy Women in the Gaza Strip through Livelihood Opportunities List of Beneficiaries
No. Full Name Age Type of Disability No. of Family Members No. of  Members with Disability in the Family Area of Residence
1 Ibtihaj Shabaan Banna 30 Deafness 7 3 Shujaiya, Gaza City
2 Ahmed Fayez Abu Audah 30 Deafness 4 2 Shati Refugee Camp, Gaza City
3 Ameen Jamal O’rom 28 Deafness 7 4 Shati Refugee Camp, Gaza City
4 Amr Abdul Salam El Dalou 32 Deafness 5 3 Sheikh Redwan, Gaza City
5 Suleiman Musa Abu Bakra 38 Deafness 5 1 Nusairat Refugee Camp, Middle Area
6 Ola Wajeeh Ayyoush 36 Deafness 6 2 Zaitoun, Gaza City
7 Majdi Ramadan Audeh 54 Deafness 5 1 Tuffah, Gaza City
8 Raed Hassan El Wassifi 39 Deafness 7 1 Nusairat Refugee Camp, Middle Area
9 Ahmed  Musbah Abu El Qumsan 27 Deafness 4 1 Sheikh Redwan, Gaza City
10 Eman Abdul Rahman Shallah 29 Deafness 6 2 Shujaiya, Gaza City
11 Bilal Ahmed Ghazal 34 Deafness 4 1 Tuffah, Gaza City
12 Bahaa Zuheir Zumlot 30 Deafness 5 1 Beit Lahya, North Area of the Gaza Strip
13 Jihan Kamel Abu Aser 32 Deafness 5 3 Shujaiya, Gaza City
14 Hussam Kamel Nofel 36 Deafness and Usher syndrome 2 2 Saftawi Area, Gaza City
15 Khadija Abdul Salam Dalou 31 Deafness 7 2 Nasser Area, Gaza City
16 Dawlat Abdul Muati El Jadba 33 Deafness 9 3 Tuffah, Gaza City
17 Rajaa Abd Rabbu Kilani 46 Deafness 2 1 Beit Lahya, North Area of the Gaza Strip
18 Shirihan Hassan Ziyada 31 Deafness 5 2 Sheikh Redwan, Gaza City
19 Abeer Anwar El Jadba 31 Deafness 8 3 Tuffah, Gaza City
20 Adla Farouk Dababesh 34 Deafness 7 2 Sheikh Redwan, Gaza City
21 Essam Mohamed Shaladan 42 Deafness 8 1 Zaitoun, Gaza City
22 Mohamed Rawhi Loulou 31 Deafness 3 1 Tel El Hawa, Gaza City
23 Mustafa Khalid Shaheen 28 Deafness 7 1 Shati Refugee Camp, Gaza City
24 Maha Reyad Hirzallah 30 Deafness 5 2 Khanyounis, South Area of the Gaza Strip
25 Miran Yahya Salha 33 Deafness 4 1 Zaitoun, Gaza City
26 Nasra Fawwaz Hejji 31 Deafness 9 1 Zaitoun, Gaza City
27 Niveen Mohamed Hassan 28 Deafness 6 1 Daraj Area, Gaza City
28 Nihad As’ad Abu Ajeena 34 Deafness 6 1 Beit Lahya, North Area of the Gaza Strip
29 Haitham Jamal Ez’Eldeen 29 Deafness 2 1 Shati Refugee Camp, Gaza City
30 Alaa Mahmoud Madi 34 Deafness 6 1 Sahaba Area, Gaza City
  Therefore, the proposed project will directly support the human, economic, and social processes for deaf persons and other marginalized women to include supported and disability-accessible job placements and job counseling and guidance.   Brief description of the target group:   Deaf persons traditionally represent the poorest of the poor in the Palestinian community. The majority of deaf youth in the Gaza Strip survive on help from family members and the community, unable to meet even the most basic of needs for food, shelter, and health-care.   The project direct beneficiaries are 30 deaf women and men and other needy women aged between 25 and 45 living in different areas throughout the Gaza Strip, with special emphasis on persons living in rural and marginalized areas, regardless of age, race, gender, and class.   Project Objective:   To contribute to the alleviation of poverty in the Gaza Strip and to improve the quality of life of deaf women and men and other needy women through enhancing their employment potential and inclusion into the community workforce.   Specific results or tangible items to be generated by the project:  
  • Employment contracts provided in different work fields and monthly income ensured for a total of 30 marginalized deaf men and women and other poor women as follow:
  • Enhanced self-esteem and easing of the social, psychological, and economic situation of deaf men and women and other marginalized women and their families
  • Self-sufficiency for deaf men and women and other marginalized women which will relieve the burden on the families, the social services system, and the community at large
  • Hunger alleviation for 30 families of deaf persons and needy women
  • Increased production leading to job creation in other income generation programs run by ASDC
  Proposed Budget:  
Item Unit No. of Units Unit Cost (USD) Total (USD) LFCT Contribution ASDC Contribution
Employment contracts ($200 monthly payment x 6 mos.) Contract 30 1,200.00   36,000.00       30,000.00        6,000.00
Total Grant (USD) 36,000.00     30,000.00       6,000.00
  Signed by: Ghada Abushahla (Ms.), Projects Officer, Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children    
1st
Jan
1970

Education Support Program “Ignorance is dangerous but knowledge without responsibility is more dangerous” Dear LFCT Donors: Please donate generously towards Syeda Javaria Zaigham to complete her MBBS (First Year) Education a soul – empower an entire community


jawaria MICT through the kind support of Lady Fatemah Trust (LFCT) is seeking to raise funds for Syeda Jawaria Zaigham who is presently attending first year of MBBS classes at Nawaz sharif medical college, Univeristy of Gujrat. Though from an impoverished background, Syeda Javaria Zaigham hopes to become a qualified doctor and embark on a career where she will be able to take care of her financially challenged family.   Family Background & Financial Condition:- Syeda Javaria Zaigham belongs to low income family of District Rawalpindi of Pakistan’s Punjab province. Her father, Syed Sibtul Hassan Shah is a school teacher with a monthly income of PKR35,220.00. Sibtul Hassan Shah is altogether responsible for supporting three children including Syeda Jawaria Zaigham, making it highly difficult for him to afford daughter’s education at NMC, University of Gujrat. Because of her family’s financial challenges, Javaria Zaigham faces the risk of discontinuing her education. Faced with deep financial distress, Javaria Zaigham needs your financial support, whereas, Jawaria Zaigham is a brilliant student and has scored well as Grade-A+ in her Higher Secondary School Certificate.   As before, MICT with the backing of The Lady Fatemah Trust will regularly monitor the academic progress of this student and provide regular updates to donors. Remember, a timely intervention to support a single student will not only go a long way in changing lives for our coming generations but also help earn a special place for you in the eyes of Allah.   Family Details of Syeda Javaria Zaigham:  
Name Age (Years) Status Occupation
Sibtul Hassan Shah 54 Father School Teacher
Zahra Hassan 49 Mother Housewife
Javaria Zaigham 20 Applicant Student
Syed Ali Hassan 19 Brother Student
Syed Mohsin Hassan 13 Brother Student
  Expenses Details of Syeda Javaria Zaigham:- The table below shows the details cost of her MBBS degree including hostel charges at NMC/UOG.  
Tuition fee & Hostel fee per year PKR 151,000.00
Remaining Years     Four Years
Expected cost for remaining four years PKR 600,000.00
Request for support for forthcoming year PKR 151,000.00
US Dollars $1,439.00
GB Pounds £984.00
EURO EUR 1,323.00
  She approached MICT for sponsorship.    Your timely support will enable this student to become a useful member of the community.   MICT will provide an update about the progress of Sister Javaria Zaigham and monitors the case.  
1st
Jan
1970

Bringing hope and happiness back into Narjis’ life – LFCT supporters, please help


le1 Narjis Bourji is 19 years old. She has a dream of studying and lifting her family out of poverty. She is the first child to attend University in her family who struggle every day to meet their basic needs. Narjis (BT in Social Animation) lives with her mother and nine siblings. Her father died when she was a child, and she lost one of her older brothers during the war. This brother was just Narjis’ age now when he died. Narjis’s miserable situation has caused her a state of depression and the hardships she has been through have turned her to a sad girl. That, however, has not stopped her from building her personality and working for a brighter future.   Family information:  
Name Relationship Age Qualifications Occupation Monthly Income
Mahmoud Father 85 years Dead
Mona Sabalni Mother 61 years 6th grade Housewife $0.00
Israa Sister 22 years $0.00
Afraa Sister 21 years $0.00
Mahdi Brother 19 years Dead
Narjes Applicant 19 years BT social animation
  The Lady Fatemah Charity Trust offers Narjis the supporting aids she needs to continue her education and prospective new life. You too can be a part of this journey. Please help support Narjis as she studies for her degree and future and bring a little bit of hope and happiness back into her life.   Applicant Educational Information  
School Name Years Attended Earned Degree Graduation Date
Intermediate Derkanoon Rasalain 3 years 7th grade
Imam Sadr Foundation Afaq Institute for Development 3  years BT1 Jun-18
  Estimated Educational costs:  
Heading Current Year  (2014 – 2015) Semester 1 Semester 2
Tuition fees $900.00 $450.00 $450.00
Registration fees $167.00 $167.00 $0.00
Books and Stationary $100.00 $100.00 $0.00
Uniform $50.00 $50.00 $0.00
Transportation $300.00 $150.00 $150.00
TOTAL $1,517.00 $917.00 $600.00
I.S.F. Part. Per Year: 2,317.00
  Just $2,317 will support Narjis’ every needs. Please help today   Thank you.
1st
Jan
1970

We need your help to enable Nour to sing a little louder today!


nour Nour Abadi is 14 years old and lives in Kadmous, Lebanon. She dreams of studying at University but her circumstances are against her. Please help her realise this dream.   Family information:  
Name Relationship Age Qualifications Occupation Monthly Income
Hassan Father 55 years Separately from the family
Hanan Mother 47 years 1st secondary Housewife chronic disease) $0.00
Souaad Sister 17 years 3rd grade Student $0.00
Fatima Sister 15 years 9th grade Student $0.00
Nour Applicant 14 years BP social animation Applicant $0.00
  Nour (BP in Social Animation) was born in USA to an epileptic mother and a physically abusive father who eventually abandoned his family. Nour, the youngest child, and her two sisters moved to Lebanon in 2012. Their mother stayed behind in order to receive adequate healthcare. The girls currently live with their maternal aunt who is married and has children. They miss their mother deeply every day. In spite of her complicated life, Nour is an intelligent and jovial person, always seeing he god in any situation. She likes to write her own songs and has a beautiful singing voice. Nour has many dreams, and as supporters of the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust, you have the ability to help Nour to achieve them.   Applicant Educational Information:  
School Name Years Attended Earned Degree Graduation Date
Secondary Tyre official for girls 1 year 7th Grade
Imam Sadr Foundation Afaq institurte for development 1 year BT1 Jan-20
  Estimated Educational costs:  
Heading Current Year  (2014 – 2015) Semester 1 Semester 2
Tuition fees $700.00 $350.00 $350.00
Registration fees $167.00 $167.00 $0.00
Books and Stationary $100.00 $100.00 $0.00
Uniform $50.00 $50.00 $0.00
Transportation $300.00 $150.00 $150.00
TOTAL $1,317.00 $817.00 $500.00
I.S.F. Part. Per Year: 1,317.00
  Nour wishes to studying Social Animation in Lebanon at the Imam Sadr Foundation Afaq Institute for Development, They have an excellent programme and it would make Nour and her family so proud to see her attend.   Please help her living costs and support costs today at a little over $25 per week.   Thank you.  
4th
May
2016

Promising landscape gardener hope to study with LFCT support


le1 Souad abadi lives in Kadmous and is 17 years old. She lives with four other members of her family and is the oldest child.   Family information:  
Name Relationship Age Qualifications Occupation Monthly Income
Hassan Father 55 years Separately from the family
Hanan Mother 47 years 1st secondary House wife(chronic disease) $0.00
Fatima Sister 15 years 9th grade Student $0.00
Nour Sister 14 years 7th grade Student $0.00
Souad Applicant 17 years Landscaping Applicant $0.00
  Souad lives with her mother and siblings and has lost touch with her father who left the family. Souad was always abused by her father and relatives and has led a difficult life. Souad, the oldest child was abused most and is timid and feeble-minded. She is studying landscaping at the institute, and is slowly develops her social and manual skills through this programme.   Applicant Educational Information:  
School Name Years Attended Earned Degree Graduation Date
Ouyoun al baraa school 1 year 3rd Grade
Imam Sadr Foundation Afaq institurte for development 1 year Landscaping Jun-16
  Estimated Educational costs:
Heading Current Year  (2014 – 2015) Semester 1 Semester 2
Tuition fees $700.00 $350.00 $350.00
Registration fees $167.00 $167.00 $0.00
Books and Stationary $100.00 $100.00 $0.00
Uniform $50.00 $50.00 $0.00
Transportation $300.00 $150.00 $150.00
TOTAL $1,317.00 $817.00 $500.00
I.S.F. Part. Per Year: 1,317.00
  We hope that as Souad completes her programme she will grow in confidence and have developed social skills that will help her future work in landscape gardening. Souad can only do this with you help.   Please consider making a donation to Souad today and help her in her in the many years to come.   Thank you.
10th
May
2016

Sponsor A Deaf Orphan Student from Gaza! Dear LFCT Donors. Please donate generously


May 2016 Gaza1 Gaza2 Gaza3 When you sponsor a deaf student, you help him/her to grow up in warmth, to receive quality education, and to be prepared for an independent life. Deaf student sponsorship provides you with the chance to witness the effect of your contribution on the life of the student forever.   Who does your contribution go to? A deaf student, female or male, aged between 5 and 17 years old enrolled in special education classes at Atfaluna School for Deaf Children. The student resides in one of the Gaza Strip’s marginalized areas and comes from extremely poor background.   Where does your contribution go? Your contribution will provide the deaf student with basic needs such as hearing aids, hearing aids batteries, healthy food, basic health care, school needs and supplies (school uniform, school bags, stationary, etc.) and school transportation.   When you sponsor a deaf student you expect to receive:
  • A student profile describing the social, economic, and health statues of the student and his/her family
  • A receipt in the amount of your donation
  • A ‘Thank You’ letter from the student with translation, if required
  • A quarterly progress report describing the student academic performance and social and health statues.
  Annual Expenditure  
Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children
Deaf Students Sponsorship Programs
Student’s Annual Expenses
Needs Unit No. of Units Unit Cost (USD) Total (USD)
Hearing Aid for deaf child H.A 1   245.00   245.00
School Transportation (home-school-home) Month 9    30.00   270.00
Hearing Aid Batteries (1 package per monnth x 9 months) Month 9      3.00    27.00
Ear Moulds Year 1    15.00    15.00
School Supplies (school uniform, school bags, stationary, school books and worksheets, etc.) Year 1     200.00     200.00
Daily Hot Meal Month 9    30.00   270.00
Medical Assistance Year 1    50.00    50.00
Total Cost (USD) 832.00
 
Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children
Sponsorship Program for Deaf Orphan Students in the Gaza Strip
No. Name Gender Age Grade Adress No. of Family Members
1 Afnan Awad Al Arayshi Female 15 7 Center Gaza City 14
2 Raghad Abdul Halim Al Fayyoumi Female 12 6 Sha’af, Gaza City 4
3 Sajid Sakher Al Neirab Male 11 5 Jabalia Refugee Camp 3
4 Maram Sakher Al Neirab Female 9 2 Jabalia Refugee Camp 3
5 Abdulllah Emad Tafish Male 7 1 Zaitoon, Gaza City 5
6 Zainab Emad Tafish Female 6 KG Zaitoon, Gaza City 5
7 Abdul Aziz Fayez Abu Auda Male 11 5 Shatie Refugee Camp 10
8 Mnawar Marwan Al Burdeini Female 7 1 Zaitoon, Gaza City 4
9 Mohannad Mahmoud Waloud Male 6 KG Jabalia Refugee Camp 4
10 Maher Mohamed Hijazi Male 13 6 Shujaiya, Gaza City 5
  Signed: Ghada Abushahla (Ms.), Projects Officer, Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children  
11th
May
2016

URGENT APPEAL: Toddler needs all the support he can get after undergoing major brain surgery at just three years old.


LEB1 LEB2 LEB3           Sayyid Ali Afdhal Mohamed Mezher Al-Yasiri is three and a half years old. He lives in Baghdad, Iraq with his two older brothers, mother and father. The family is currently in Lebanon, seeking emergency treatment in Lebanon.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Mohamed Mezher Father 02 April 1976 Sheik Varied
Hajir Matar Mother 10 June 1982 $0.00
Ali Afdhal Son / Applicant 16 September 2012 Toddler $0.00
Ali Akbar Brother 10 December 2008 Student $0.00
Ali Asghar Brother 06 August 2000 Student $0.00
  Ali was found to be suffering from Epilepticus with refractory to levetiracetam and valproate. His attending physician is Dr Ahmad Baydoun in Lebanon. 20 days ago he presented at the American University of Beruit Hospital. Investigations revealed right parietal cortical dysplasia on MRI seizure protocol and subtraction Ictal-Interictal SPECT revealed an increased uptake in the right parietal cortical dysplasia as well as in the pricureus. Ali was loaded with Phentoin Locosamide and Lorazepam. He was still refractory while receiving the 5 Antiepiletics, in addition to a ketogenic diet. Ali needed surgery immediately.   Two stage surgery was completed on Monday April 25th 2016. Ali underwent the first stage surgery with a 4X5 grid, 2X6 strip and 1X8 strip were placed to cover the suspicious lesion and 3 deep electrodes were inserted into the anterior, posterior and mesial aspects and intracranial recording and mapping were performed for three days. In addition, VBM (Volumetric Analysis) revealed abnormal signal in the junction, extension and thickness over the lesion. As all data were concordant, surgical resection was done on April 25, 2016 and intraoperative electrocorticography was completed alongside EEG recorded from all edges. In addition, intraoperative motor cortex mapping and white matter mapping were done in order to preserve the motor cortex and white matter tracts for the motor cortex. Post-operatively, he was admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for further management.   This is an awful procedure for any human being, let along an innocent toddler. What makes this even more excruciating for the family is that they are poor and can ill afford this treatment, with the father a Sheik an the mother a full time housewife looking after three children. Of course the family had no choice but to go ahead with the procedure to save their little son, Ali. The total cost of the surgery was $33,000 USD. The family have sought a donation of $15,000 already but desperately seek the remaining $18,000/£12,400.   Please LFCT donors, give all you can to help pay for this little boy’s treatment and wish him a speedy and full recovery so soon he will be playing and laughing again like any little toddler should.   Thank you very much.   Signed by: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Chair Lady / Managing Trustee, Manessa Association  
13th
May
2016

Malawi – QE Hospital Appeal


May 2016 The Renovation of the Plumbing System at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi ~ PHASE 5a: Renovation of the female ablution block on the TB ward LFCT Donors. PLEASE Donate Generously towards this project  13th May 1 13th May 2 13th May Project Objective To renovate the female ablution block on the TB wards at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, (QECH) Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections to post female TB patients. As TB patients typically spend several months at Queens, the conditions of the toilet and shower facilities is particularly important  as they are essential for better care and for the dignity of the patients and guardians who care for them. The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof. Project Narrative Every day in Queen’s hospital there are between 70 to 80 TB patients- a typical stay is for 2 months but this can increase when patients develop resistance to the drugs. TB patient very often also have secondary infections such as pneumonia. The conditions of the toilet and shower facilities is of utmost importance as TB is an infectious disease. QECH was built in 1958 and at the time was considered the pinnacle of hospital facilities in Malawi. Today, nearly 60 years later, the buildings are cramped, owing not only to the HIV epidemic but also to an approximately 5-fold increase in Malawi’s population since 1958.  The wards are therefore no longer able to meet the needs of sick patients, let alone their guardians and families, or indeed the medical staff that work there. Statistics reveal the current problem of overcrowding with, for example, the 50-bed women’s ward regularly housing over 70 patients, and sometimes over 100. This overcrowding results in mattresses being placed on the floor between beds and even in corridors. In addition, nursing & medical staff regularly work under extremely difficult circumstances with very limited resources. QECH is also the major clinical teaching site for Malawi’s only medical school, with over 100 medical students based at QECH each day during the academic year. The TB ward is used as a training place for the for the College of Medicine student doctors in Malawi. ChiraFund believes that the creation of a healthier, cleaner and more dignified environment for patients also creates a better learning environment for students.  These graduates are Malawi’s newest doctors and midwives – who will take their experience to district hospitals and health centres throughout the country. We also believe that if they learn their clinical practice in a positive, patient-supportive environment, they will translate this to wherever they work elsewhere in Malawi.  The importance of creating the conditions within which sick patients can be cared for in suitable and comfortable surroundings, as well as accommodating the guardians and families who assist with their care, has long been recognised. After several decades of heavy utilisation, the physical condition of the plumbing system has deteriorated to an unusable state with blocked sewage systems, broken and leaking pipes, unsuitable toilets, broken showers. The current sewage system is unable to cope with the high volume of patients and guardians currently using them. This has led to rats and other vermin taking residence near the wards. While routine maintenance and ad hoc repairs works have been carried out over the years, the present conditions of the plumbing system present significant infection control risks and compromise the care and dignity of the patients. Nosocomial illness – due to disease-causing organisms spreading between individuals in hospital – is an important risk in crowded wards such as these, for example, women post-partum are particularly susceptible to infections.   The risk of acquiring a nosocomial infection is highest in each ward’s toilet and ablutions block, where up to 200 people share the same seats, sinks, taps, showers and towels.  They also share the same floor – on which most walk bare-foot. The plumbing system, especially the toilet and sink facilities need frequent renovation, as well as thorough and regular cleaning.   At present we recognise that without a complete overhaul, the now ageing system is impossible to clean adequately and are a constant health hazard.  We would like to renovate these with good-quality components and to a design that will allow effective ventilation and efficient cleaning   Project Work plan and Timeline-PHASE 5a The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof of the female toilets at the TB ward. The work will commence on Monday 11h of April and will be completed Friday 22ndth of April. Project Budget details and breakdown The total proposed budget is MK 2,218,664.45 (£2,346.00 at exchange rate 06/04/2016)
Quotation for Female Toilet in the TB Ward
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi ~ PHASE 5a: Renovation of the female ablution block on the TB ward
Item Quantity Rate Amount KK GB£
Flush master toilet 3    96,462.00 289,386.00   305.95
Replace piping    50,000.00        50,000.00     52.85
Replace squats pan 2   179,000.00      358,000.00   378.50
Nu-lite ceiling and painting   102,879.00      102,879.00   108.75
Cornices 10      3,500.00        35,000.00     37.00
Metal door frames complete with painting 6   124,308.00      745,848.00   788.55
Tiling   204,120.00      204,120.00   215.80
Shower Rose 3    13,110.00        39,330.00     41.60
Wash Hand Basin complete with taps 1    22,680.00        22,680.00     24.00
Replace taps to match 3    13,230.00        39,690.00     41.95
Replace sphere fitting with bulbs 5      3,500.00        17,500.00     18.50
SUB TOTAL   1,904,433.00 2,013.45
ADD 16.5% VAT      314,231.45     332.22
GRAND TOTAL   2,218,664.45   2,345.67
  Technical capacity to deliver the project Over the past ten years, ChiraFund have been involved in many projects at QECH. Some examples of projects our charities have successfully managed in the past include:
  • Complete refurbishment of the TB ward with the aid of a 20 million kwacha grant from the National Bank of Malawi;
  • Refurbishment of ablution blocks on Male and Female ward with the aid of grant funding from Irish Aid;
  • The building of guardian shelters and washing facilities with funds raised from QECH doctors;
  • Renovation of the toilet and shower facilities in dermatology ward with funds raised in UK through individual fundraising, and;
  • The provision of additional medicines, bandages, toilet paper with funds from Charity Advisory Trust UK.
For this project, we secured three quotations from building contractors: Mwanic Building Contractors,, Kamungu Construction and Elite Construction.   After interviews and project site visits, the contract will be awarded to Mwanic Building Contactors based on price and ability to do the job. We will use the same approach as we used for the successful renovation of the ablution blocks including:
  • The signing of a contract between ChiraFund and the contractor designed to ensure quality of service and guarantees on the materials;
  • The overseeing of the renovations on a daily basis by ChiraFund project manager George Musowa and ChiraFund coordinator Alice Taylor;
  • Regular monitoring and evaluation by ChiraFund in collaboration with the onsite project manager from the construction company, and;
  • Ensuring the sustainably of the project by regular liaising with hospital administration on-site.
Controls to ensure satisfactory financial management and effective oversight of project resources ChiraFund have very strict financial policies and procedures in place including two signatories on all cheques, bank withdrawals and deposits. All expenditure has to be pre-approved by the trustees and in line with agreed spending for the financial year.   In addition, AMG Global-Certified Global Accountants and Business Advisors provide ChiraFund with accountancy and auditing services and provide an annual check and audit.   All funds donated are receipted and a report documenting and explaining how funds were spent is provided at the end of the project.   All project resources quoted by the contractor, are double checked to be of the standard (make, no, type) agreed by Alice Taylor (co-ordinator ChiraFund) and George Musowa (project manager ChiraFund).   Consultation ChiraFund have consulted with and received permission from QECH hospital management to proceed with this work. We have consulted with ward sisters from each ward; Mr Chimphamba (Chief Plumber QECH_), Mr. Ndovi (Quantity Surveyor), Mr. Mhango (Chief Hospital Administrator) as well as numerous doctors around the hospital including Dr. Bonongwe (Head of Obstetrics), Dr. Mallewa (Head of Medical Wards), Dr. Dube (Head of Paediatrics), Dr. Masambe (Head Oncology) Dr. Huwa (Head of Palliative Care), Dr. Kuweruza (Head of Dental) and a number of guardians and patients.   Sustainability of the project ChiraFund are in ongoing discussions with the hospital administration to ensure the sustainability of the work we do. Hospital Administration has agreed to;
  • Strengthen routine inspection so that problems are identified early and preventive maintenance in place;
  • Increase security in the wards by increasing the numbers of hired guards
  • Provision of staff IDs to maintenance team who go and work in various wards. This will filter fake artisan from the streets who are vandalizing the plumbing equipment;
  • Extend the sourced out cleaning services to wards like Paediatrics and advise them on the type of equipment that they should use in a hospital set up, and;
  • Intensify Health Education talks to guardians and patients on the proper use of ablution facilities.
Reporting and acknowledgement We can provide a mid-term review and a more extensive project outcomes report upon completion with receipts, pictures etc.   We can place a prominent plaque or any other such acknowledgment desired, at the hospital in recognition of the donation from the LFCT.   Professor Alice Taylor (PhD) Coordinator ChiraFund   On behalf of Professor Malcolm Molyneux-Chairperson ChiraFund UK Dr. Jane Mallewa-Chairperson ChiraFund Malawi
2nd
Jun
2016

APPEAL: Vital surgery for a family man. Please help Mohd and his family today.


May 2016 Mohammed Raza lives in Lucknow in India with his wife and family, two daughters and a son. Born in 1957, Mohammed worked as a driver bringing in enough income into his family to support their basic needs – they had just enough to get by, but they really depended on him. Mohammed recently had to give up work as he was diagnosed with coronary heart disease. Mohammed is in desperate need of some surgery, an angioplasty; surgery that will fit a stent to open up his blocked heart valves in order that Mohammed suffers no future problems and drastically reduces his risk of a heart attack.
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Mohammed Raza Self 59 Unemployed INR 0.00
Paro Fatima Wife 42 Housewife INR 0.00
Nisha Fatima Daughter 21 Student INR 0.00
Shoib Raza Son 19 Taking AC training INR 5,000.00
Khushnuma Fatima Daughter 16 Student INR 0.00
  Since Mohammed was forced to stop working his son is bringing an income into the family through his job as an AC repair person. Unfortunately this one salary is not enough for the whole family to live off and for the family to pay for Mohammed’s treatment. His family are extremely worried and see no light at the end of the tunnel. If Mohammed does not receive the surgery, he will almost certainly become critically ill and the family will be devastated. The family are in need of 100,000 Rs or £1,022GBP. This is years off for the family if they were to save, their son only brining in 5,000 Rs per month. As some of you might know, having a close family member that needs serious surgery is a worry in itself, let alone knowing that you must raise the money for that surgery and the money that is needed is nearly two whole years of your family’s entire income. You would feel desperate and helpless. Please help to provide Mohammed and his family with the good news they are praying so hard to receive, that the LFCT is able to fund Mohammed’s vital surgery. Please give generously to this appeal – the LFCT needs your help to make this a reality.   Thank you.
1st
Jan
1970

APPEAL: Microfinance project aims to bring relief – taxi vehicle to lift Sadaat Widow family out of poverty.


May 2016 Family Data:
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
SHAHNAZ RIZVI Mother 46 Widow INR 0.00
SHANJAR IMAM  Applicant 24   INR 0.00
ADEEB ZEHRA Sibling 18 Student INR 0.00
AKHTARI BEGUM Aunt 60   INR 0.00
SAJIDA RIZVI Aunt 38 Housewife INR 0.00
KANEEZ ZEHRA Cousin 21 Student INR 0.00
SYED SHABAB HAIDER RIZVI Cousin 16 Student INR 0.00
SYED SHADAB HAIDER RIZVI Cousin 15 Student INR 0.00
SYED IRFAN HAIDER RIZVI Cousin 14 Student INR 0.00
Shajar Imam is 25. He lives in New Delhi, India with his family. Shajar’s father passed away some years ago and he himself lost one leg during an accident. Despite these tragic circumstances Shajar’s mother has worked hard to provide him with an education and is now doing the same for his two sisters. They are currently studying 100km away in Bihar. Shajar’s mother is helping to look after her two sister and their children, they too are unfortunately, widows. Together they hope to support each other, but life is tough. Shajar is working at a study Centre, teaching children but is earing very little, just £200 per month. He is frequently ill as the family can barely afford food to keep them self well nourished. This is despite Shajar’s mother working so hard and spreading herself so thinly to support not only her disabled son, but her two daughter, he widowed sister and their children too. There is scarcely enough food to go round. Shajar’s mother has recently moved to Dubai for a cleaning job, she is hoping to send money back, but she has found herself in a difficult situation and misses her family greatly, but she was desperate to help her family survive. Shajar believes there is a way out of this miserable situation. He is appealing to the LFCT for funding for a car – a car he can use as a taxi and to earn a good wage to bring the family out of poverty. The family need a more stable income to support their extended family and something that is flexible and will work with them. A taxi is ideal for this. They could triple or even quadruple their income easily. The vehicle, all setup including insurance and tax will cost £7,344. Please, LFCT donors, help support this family that have had such a difficult past and a mother who goes to extreme lengths to ensure food on the table for her loved ones. Thank you
1st
Jan
1970

APPEAL: Just 20 years old and on a kidney dialysis. Desperate plea to support critical young Saddat man awaiting kidney transplant


May 2016

Syed Mutaza Naqvi, is just 20 years old and both of his kidneys have failed.

Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation   Income
Syed Mohd. Muslim Father 56 Teacher   INR 1,335.00
Saira Bano Mother 47 House wife   INR 0.00
Syed Mohd. Askari Brother 27 Service   INR 916.50
Ghazala Khatoon Sister 25 Student   INR 0.00
 

About two years ago, Mutaza Naqvi had some pain in the lower back for which he continued with local treatment for backache, which finally was diagnosed a case of problematic kidneys for which he would surely face difficulties with in the future. Unfortunately, Mutaza’s family could not afford further tests and guidance and with their meager monthly income, would try alternative therapies wherever possible (as suggested by relatives and friends). In reality, this was actually further aggravating his condition. It is with much regret that Mutaza realized he needed dialysis and kidney transplants – for which he is now aware is for two new kidneys. He is just 20 years old and both of his kidneys have failed for no fault of his own. Until very recently Mutaza was studying but now he has had to stop as he has become too sick.

Mutuza’s parents are not a match for kidney donors and so now he is looking a donor within the extended family. However, in the meantime, a dialysis machine is needed. The Doctor has given an estimate of Rs.35,000/£357 for a month (thrice in a week) for the dialysis and medicine. The local Momineen has contributed for the first month dialysis.

However, this month will soon be up for Mutuza and his life is resting on a knifes edge. It is likely that even if a donor is found soon it could be up to sixth months until a transplant takes place, and this is best case scenario. If Mestiza does not have the dialysis machine he will simply die.

Dialysis is a procedure to remove waste products and excess fluid from the blood when the kidneys stop working properly. It often involves diverting blood to a machine to be cleaned. Normally, the kidneys filter the blood, removing harmful waste products and excess fluid and turning these into urine to be passed out of the body. Without this, the body cannot function.

Please help to provide Mutual and his family with the peace of mind that he has six months of dialysis fully funded so the family can ease their worries. The cost of this is just £2,146. This family really do need your support to help keep their son alive. Please help today.

Thank you

6th
Jun
2016

Noor and Hiba barely remember their father as they grow up in the shadow of war


June 2016 June month Noor and Hiba are orphans aged 12 and nine years old. They have five other siblings and live with their mother in a small house in Kerbala. The house they rent only has two rooms where the whole family must live. Their monthly rental is 250000IDQ. Their mother is sick with rheumatism and she needs a weekly treatment for this chronic disease which causes her much pain and distress. Family Data:
Name Age Gender Occupation
Noor Moayed Amery 12 years Female Six class Primary school
Hiba Moayed   Amery 9 years Female Fourth class primary school
Saud Moayed Amery 8 years Female Second class
Mohamed Ali Moayed Amery 15 years Male Secondary S.(first class)
Mustafa Moayed Amery 14 years Male Secondary S. (first class)
Hasanin Moayed Amery 7 years Male First class of school
Hanin Moayed Amery 5 years Female Kinder garden
  Their father was working as a daily labourer, bringing in a small income to the family, but an income nonetheless which meant the family could live in dignity. One day the father became very fatigued and his blood sugar level spiked and sent him into a coma. He suddenly passed away despite the family trying to get him to a hospital. It was realised that he suffered from diabetes but did not realise it at the time.   This non-sadaat family are receiving funding support from the LFCT for the individual children and the mother is taking part in the micro-finance project. The mother joined the micro-finance project in January 2016 and has really being seeing a benefit from the profit she is making.   Noor and Hiba and just two of the estimated 800,000 children and rising that have lost at least one parent in Iraq. Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues, over this weekend in June 2016 alone, 50 more innocent people have been killed or injured as a result of shootings and bombings in restaurants and market places.   Iraq struggles to cope with these sheer numbers of orphans. It is estimated that the country only has 200 social workers and psychiatrists put together, for a population of 30 million people. It has no child protection laws. Innocent children are the ones that suffer the most in Iraq’s ongoing violence. The repercussions can be felt everywhere, rippling out across society. Income generation and schooling is affected and yet with the LFCT’s joint programmes, both widows and orphans can be supported with the view that widows will become long term self-sufficient once their micro-finance business selling clothing begins to grow with their confidence and newly acquired skills. Please help to support orphans like Noor and Hiba today with the LFCT’s flagship Orphan programme.  A monthly stipend of $100 is helping the family to study and become fully self-sufficient in the long run. This is a small amount but goes a long way to ensuring the family have their very basic needs covered. Your generous and continue support means the LFCT can help some of Iraq’s many orphans through their hardship, but more support is still needed. Please donate generously so that the LFCT can continue this life changing project. Thank you.  Signed by: Sister Israa Razzaq Al Sikafi and Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar
1st
Jan
1970

Noor and Hiba barely remember their father as they grow up in the shadow of war


June 2016 June month Noor and Hiba are orphans aged 12 and nine years old. They have five other siblings and live with their mother in a small house in Kerbala. The house they rent only has two rooms where the whole family must live. Their monthly rental is 250000IDQ. Their mother is sick with rheumatism and she needs a weekly treatment for this chronic disease which causes her much pain and distress. Family Data:
Name Age Gender Occupation
Noor Moayed Amery 12 years Female Six class Primary school
Hiba Moayed   Amery 9 years Female Fourth class primary school
Saud Moayed Amery 8 years Female Second class
Mohamed Ali Moayed Amery 15 years Male Secondary S.(first class)
Mustafa Moayed Amery 14 years Male Secondary S. (first class)
Hasanin Moayed Amery 7 years Male First class of school
Hanin Moayed Amery 5 years Female Kinder garden
Their father was working as a daily labourer, bringing in a small income to the family, but an income nonetheless which meant the family could live in dignity. One day the father became very fatigued and his blood sugar level spiked and sent him into a coma. He suddenly passed away despite the family trying to get him to a hospital. It was realised that he suffered from diabetes but did not realise it at the time. This non-sadaat family are receiving funding support from the LFCT for the individual children and the mother is taking part in the micro-finance project. The mother joined the micro-finance project in January 2016 and has really being seeing a benefit from the profit she is making. Noor and Hiba and just two of the estimated 800,000 children and rising that have lost at least one parent in Iraq. Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues, over this weekend in June 2016 alone, 50 more innocent people have been killed or injured as a result of shootings and bombings in restaurants and market places.   Iraq struggles to cope with these sheer numbers of orphans. It is estimated that the country only has 200 social workers and psychiatrists put together, for a population of 30 million people. It has no child protection laws. Innocent children are the ones that suffer the most in Iraq’s ongoing violence. The repercussions can be felt everywhere, rippling out across society. Income generation and schooling is affected and yet with the LFCT’s joint programmes, both widows and orphans can be supported with the view that widows will become long term self-sufficient once their micro-finance business selling clothing begins to grow with their confidence and newly acquired skills. Please help to support orphans like Noor and Hiba today with the LFCT’s flagship Orphan programme.  A monthly stipend of $100 is helping the family to study and become fully self-sufficient in the long run. This is a small amount but goes a long way to ensuring the family have their very basic needs covered. Your generous and continue support means the LFCT can help some of Iraq’s many orphans through their hardship, but more support is still needed. Please donate generously so that the LFCT can continue this life changing project. Thank you.  Signed by: Sister Israa Razzaq Al Sikafi and Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar
7th
Jun
2016

Help Zehra today by investing not only in her future, but that of her family and wider community


June 2016 z Zehra is 18 years old and has her whole life ahead of her. The direction she takes is uncertain at present but she is determined and has shown that determination by being accepted at a top University and is appealing to LFCT for support for her future. Family data:
Name Relation to Applicant Age Occumation Income
Syed Bahadur Ali Shah Father 47 Unemployed PKR 0.00
Bibi Rozina Mother 40 Social Worker PKR 10,000.00
Zehra Shah Applicant 18 Student PKR 0.00
Fizza Shah Sister 20 Student PKR 0.00
Ibadat Shah Brother 11 Student PKR 0.00
Syed Zamin Raza Brother 5 Student PKR 0.00
  The course Zehra would like to study is a BSC in Computer Science. The course will last for four years and has eight semesters. The total fee is estimated to be 450,000 PKR/£2,959 with the first semester fees 73,200PKR. Zehra has submitted her application to Iqra University and had an aptitude test on the 17th April 2016. The University is raked top in Pakistan for Business and Computer Studies and Zehra will be based at Gulshan Campus. The University’s academic year starts in June 2016. Zehra passed the aptitude test with flying colours and is now ready to begin her course, excited for what this will bring for her future.   Zehra is from a Sadaat family. She has two sisters aged 20 and eleven and one brother aged five. Her father has not been able to work for a last few years because he has been suffering from hepatitis for which medical treatment is ongoing. He was working as an assistant engineer and bringing in a good wage. Zehra’s mother is a social worker and her income per month is about 10,000PKR, this is the amount the whole family are having to live off. The father’s illness has caused a real burden on the family who are all very hardworking and the children bright and conscientious. Zehra’s eldest sister has achieved good grades to be able to get admission in a medical college in Karachi but due to the family’s financial situation is not able to apply to take this further. Zehra hopes the future will be different for her though the help of the LFCT. Zehra is a hardworking student and is also studying an Islamic Course through an Iranian University in her spare time. She believes that if she achieve the degree in Computer Science, then her chances of being invited to Iran for further studies in Islam will become likely. Further, if she decides to stay in Karachi, her prospects of finding a good career job would be greatly improved. Zehra promises to work hard and make her family and the LFCT sponsors proud.   Without going to University and furthering her studies, Zehra will struggle to get a decent job, she will not be able to progress and as the marketplace in Pakistan is getting more and more competitive, her work will be dull and repetitive. With a degree she will stand out and will have greater choice and career job perspectives. Furthermore, by educating Zehra the impact will be much more widely felt. She will be able to support and give back to her family as well as becoming an educated and active citizen in Pakistan or Iran.   LFCT donors, please consider supporting Zehra today and see the difference you can make. Thank you.
1st
Jan
1970

APPEAL: Help an excellent student finish her exams and give back to her community today


June 2016 m Mwanaisha Ali Massoud has completed her first year of studies, with her own funds and is appealing to the LFCT for assistance for her to continue. Mwanaisha Ali Massoud began studying for her MA in Business Administration at the TMBI College of Business and Finance in Dar-es Salaam and started in 2015. She has now completed the first year of four and has paid for her own studies including all fees and support costs up until now. Mwanaisha was able to support herself through the friendship of her brother and his friends who knew how important it was to her to study. Fortunately, with this help Mwanaisha was able to finish all of her modules for the year. She has just started her second year but unfortunately has no funding available and her support has now run out. She was promised some funding support from another family friend but unfortunately they passed away and there is no access to funding. The University have let her start the semester already despite her non-payment. The University have testified that Mwanaisha is a competent, vigilant and hardworking student in all of her modules and want her to succeed but can only take her so far without payment. Since the semester has already started, Mwanaisha has been desperately searching for support and funding for the tuition fees. She is required to pay fees by the start of exams on 19.06.2016 and before they end on 28.06.2016. Every student is required to pay for all costs of studies before starting to examinations and if the student fails to pay they may not be allowed to sit the exams. Understandably, Mwanaisha is very distressed at the search for money and is still revising hard and preparing for the examinations despite not knowing if she can sit them. Mwanaisha has sought the assistance of PEDEO in order to help her funding the continuation of her studies. Her family are far too poor to even join together and pay for her fees. PEDEO in turn are appealing to the LFCT or assistance in this special case. Without this assistance Mwanaisha will be unable to continue in her studies and she will have no option but to drop out. This will break her heart, she has worked so hard to get where she is now and faces a much brighter future with an MA besides her name and hard work to show for it. Please help to support Mwanaisha today to complete her studies. The total for the year (Fees Only) is 4,500,000TSHs (US$ 2,100 approx.). After completing her studies Mwanaisha will become a responsible citizen, giving back to her community – something her MA will enable her to do. Thank you for giving Mwanaisha a chance today.
13th
Jun
2016

Super seller for the month Rabab, beaming with pride!


June 2016 A new incentive scheme is getting underway on the microfinance project, under the guidance of LFCT. a b c It was decided that the top seller each month; be rewarded a US$ 20.00 incentive for their achievements and have pride of place on the notice board for all to read and learn from this success.   We are delighted to announce that this month’s top seller is Widow Sister Rabab Jabir, best seller of Shaban month.   So what led to Rabab’s success? Rabab decided she would try to sell garments through her neighbours shop. She also decided that she would go to all of her friends and explain how they could get involved and show the great quality of the garments for sale. She promoted their good quality which is far superior to cheaper imports from Chinese markets. The price is similar to local goods but a much better quality.   Rabab has given feedback that more children’s clothes as there is a great demand for them. Rabab put her US$ 20.00 towards the funding she needs each month to buy the clothing to sell on.   Rabab was delighted when she visited the micro-finance project and saw her face on the board declaring she was the top seller and winner this month. With tears in her eyes she asked to be called immediately when new clothes were ready so that she could participate during the month of Ramadhan and beyond.   Comments Widow Sister Rabab Jabir: She is a widow of 6 orphans children; five boys and one girl.  She has depending upon on the charity of the Trust plus the assistance of her relatives. Rabab said “I am very happy of the working and getting money without asking from the people. I am pleased be declared the best seller for Shabban Month”. Rabab has started stitching from her house. From the garments she gets from Micro Finance Shop, she designs her own and sales too.   A huge congratulations to Sister Rabab   Project details: Location: Iraq – Holy Kerbala   Date of Report: 6th June March 2016   Implemented by: LFCT and coordinated with DRF   Objectives and summary: The micro-finance garments selling project for widows aims to make widows self-dependent and confident in their own abilities, equipping them with the skills for a sustainable livelihood and to provide a positive role model for their children. The project works by assisting widows in stitching garments in a workshop in Lebanon. These garments are then sold by widows in Iraq that are partaking in the LFCT’s widow and orphans support project. They keep any profit they make from the selling of garments. The project also directly sells from its project site in Lebanon. To date, the current number of widow’s active participants is 97; sellers is 353 and direct sell participants is 83.   Signed by: Mrs Saly Naser and Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar. Head of Widows Micro Finance Project
1st
Jan
1970

Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children (ASDC)


June, 2016

Appeal to the Lady Fatemah (A.S.) Charitable Trust (LFT)

Mariam Abu Qutta

1

It is ‘just another day’ for many people, but for Yusra Abu Qutta it is another day of challenges. Yusra a mother of eight continues to struggle daily to keep her children’s needs covered. With a bed ridden husband and five children suffering from thalassemia this mother has plenty of responsibilities in her life. Adding to her heart ache is her daughter Mariam, a ten year old little girl who suffers from a number of medical conditions of which some are yet undiagnosed. Mariam just graduated from Grade 4, she is a smiley and friendly little girl who likes her school and teachers very much. Although she suffers from a weak immune system, dizziness, fatigue, general weakness and is regularly admitted to hospital Mariam continues to attend school and accumulates good results throughout the year. At the age of 6 the little girl’s school teachers began to notice that her sight was delaying her school development, after several checkups she was diagnosed with a mass in her right eye which needed to be surgically removed. At such a young age and already suffering from thalassemia the procedure could not be done. Doctors advised her to delay the surgery till the age of 10. In the meantime arrangements were made and Mariam was moved to the first row of her classroom and was fitted with temporary eyeglasses to assist her in class.   Adding to her medical condition Mariam also began to suffer from severe bouts of abdominal pain which leaves her screaming with discomfort in addition to severe urine complications all of which have been left undiagnosed up till this date. Yusra, the little girl’s mother, does everything possible to keep her daughter healthy and safe, but the family’s financial burden often leaves her helpless. Mariam has a follow up transfer to one of the main hospitals in Egypt where she is to carry out the surgical procedure for her eye and work on diagnosing her abdominal pains. The family is completely incapable of covering the fees of this medical trip and therefore, we seek the generous assistance of the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust to support this little girl during this very difficult time.
15th
Jun
2016

LFCT completes a further 11 wells in Pakistan. Bringing water to some who have waited all their life. Thank you LFCT supporters – “We thank you and all those who made it possible. Your reward is with Allah and He is best to reward.”


June 2016  a b c
Statement of Account LFCT 12th Donation for Water Schemes dedicated to Bibi Sakina. Projects implemented by Pravalli Welfare Trust, Islamabad, Pakistan
No Details of scheme completed Total Cost
1 Village Name: Bohdoor ji wand; Cast of people living there: Bajeedani Lanka Tehsil/Tahulka: Islam KotUnion Council: Manjthi Union Council: Manjthi District: Tharparkar No of houses: 20. No of people living: 120. Before they were getting water which was half KM away. The place where Hand Pump will be installed will be made WAQF PKR 60,000.00 £395.35
2 Village Name: Yaroo Lanjo Maro Cast of people living: lanja Tehsil/Tahulka: Islamkot District: Tharparkar No of houses: 8 No of people living here:70 Before they were getting water which was half KM away. Depth of hand pump = 85 feet The place where Hand Pump will be installed will be made WAQF PKR 60,000.00 £395.35
3 In scheme named as Bogri– Rahi. Water was pumped with a powerful electric pump and brought to 15 houses comprising of 110 people. PKR 39,600.00 £260.95
4 In scheme Massah Sydan — Karun na Bagla.Water was brought from a distant source through gravity flow. The pipe measuring 3500 feet was buried so as to last long. It lasts for 50 years if buried. If remains open then it has life of only 5/6 years.  ​This will feed 18 houses with a population of 95 people. jazak Allah. PKR 30,800.00 £202.95
5 Water supply scheme Landa – Chankot. With this scheme water was pumped from a water hole located at a place much lower than the village. Women used to fetch water from there on their heads. They were supplied with an electric pump and water pipe to get the water to the houses. This will save them from daily labour of getting water from far off distance. PKR 25,971.00 £171.15
6 . This is also a pumping scheme through which water was pumped from a water source down below from the village to the houses on higher elevation.  The location is Sandwari in Khuaian village. This place has 14 houses with a population of around 80 people. Here also women had to go on slippery track to reach the water pit down below. Jazak Allah, PKR 48,950.00 £322.55
7 This is place where plate written with ‘’ Ya Mahdi adrakna’’ is placed. The locality name is Thapla in village Chinali. Water was pumped from a water pit below the village to the populated locality. This place has about 18 houses comprising of around 110 people. Women folk used to walk the difficult terrain to get water. Great sigh of relief for them. PKR 23,200.00 £152.90
8 This place has plate written with ‘’Ya Abbas’’ Location is named as Dakhan in village Chinali in district Abbottabad in KPK.  It has 12 houses comprising of 75 people. Women folk used to walk the difficult terrain to get water. Great sigh of relief for them. Water pumped to village with the help of motor and pipes. PKR 31,450.00 £207.25
9 Water supply scheme at Bunna lamb in village Lora. Through this scheme water was pumped from a well already available to 15 houses on the hillock above it. The locality is populated with 80 people. PKR 29,800.00 £196.35
10 Village called Naanoni, the bore was made by people themselves and they were provided with casing and pump. This location comprises of 15 houses with about 95 people living there. They had to walk about half a Km to get water earlier. Now they have water at their door step PKR 29,800.00 £196.35
11 In Titkot khuian the Hand pump was provided by the Government but that was much below the houses where people lived. To pump the water up to the houses they were provided with electric pump and pipes. PKR 31,000.00 £204.30
Total Cost PKR 410,571.00 £2,705.45
Total CREDIT available PKR 510,000.00 £3,360.55
Credit Balance Brought forward to 13th Project PKR 99,429.00 £655.10
  The water well programme of the LFCT is ongoing. It is difficult to imagine life without water running at the turn of the tap but this is the reality for the beneficiaries we work with across the world. Please help us to keep providing these water wells by donating to our ongoing water work. Let the voices of some of the beneficiaries understand just what a huge impact something so simple as providing water, and something we all take for granted, has had on their lives. Comments from beneficiaries: “I had the desire to get water to our locality but we lacked knowledge and resources to do that. You people came to show us the way and did it for us. We thank you and all those who made it possible. Your reward is with Allah and He is best to reward. Thank you so much,” Male resident, 55 years, Dakhan Chinali “I have been waiting for this to happen all the time in my life. We women get water daily on our head even when pregnant. Many got abortion due to this heavy load carrying water on their heads. Thanks to all those who came to our help and gave us relief. We pray to Allah to quench your thirst at Hoze Kausar in Qiamat. We pray for your long life and protection of your health, wealth and family,” Female resident, 65 years, Sandwari Village “Thank you all for this gift. This is the best thing that has happened to us in many, many years. Old women could carry this load but for new girls it was difficult as they are fragile and not as strong as we were. Thank you and your Jaza is with Allah. We can only pray for you and your family. For your happiness and well-being in all fields,” female resident in Landa in Chankot
1st
Jan
1970

Seeing the colours of life again – restoring sight in partnership with the LRBT. LFCT Donors: Please donate generously towards this project


June 2016 22.1 2.2 This month, LFCT’s partner, the LRBT restores the eyesight of 40 patients free of charge; 35 from Kashmir and five others. This month of Ramadan we share the story of Ghulam Sarwer.  
SUMMARY OF CATARACT SURGERIES FOR MAY 2016
HOSPITAL Azad Jammu & Kashmir OTHERS
AKORA KHATAK 0 2
KORANGI 2 0
LAHORE 4 0
MANDRA 10 0
MANSEHRA 19 0
SHAHPUR 0 3
TOTAL 35 2
Grand Total 40
At an age where people usually stop struggling and start enjoying the fruits of their labour, 40-year-old Ghulam Sarwar – a resident of a small town of Sahiwal, Pakistan, still has a long way to go before he can sit back and relax, if ever. Born into a poor family where his father worked as a handyman at a neighbourhood mechanic shop, Ghulam was raised in poverty and was determined to break free. Never having been to a school, he joined his father and started working at an early age. A decade later, he became a welder and started working on his own – visiting homes and working for companies that needed him – the money, though not much, gave him sustainable living of around Rs.8000 – 10,000/£54 – 67 per month and he was at least able to promise his family food on the table. Having helped marry his sisters off, he finally settled down himself by the age of 32 – in the hope of finding some stability and peace. Ghulam now has five children and remains the only breadwinner in his family. Just last month he started noticing that his vision was deteriorating – affecting his work. His family rely on him and he was greatly perturbed. A local neighbourhood doctor examined him, charged Rs.500/£3.30 for his first check-up and diagnosed him with cataract in both the eyes. The expenses of cataract surgery were so high that he could not afford it at all and was very distressed. After a few days, one of his old customers told him about LRBT Shahpur and Ghulam took the first opportunity to visit the facility where, after complete examination, his diagnosis was confirmed and surgery date assigned. His surgery was performed without any hitches and was successful. He is now back at work – able to feed his family and extremely grateful for a second chance at life. Ghulam says, “Sight is a great blessing of Almighty Allah that LRBT has restored. I never thought I could ever see the colours of life again and was depressed about the future of my family. I am very thankful to Almighty Allah and doctors, staff and especially kind donors of LRBT who saved me and many people of Pakistan from blindness”. The LRBT treat 36% of all cataract patients in Pakistan through their 19 hospitals and has been operating for 30 years, founded by the late Graham Layton and Zaka Rahmatulla. LRBT, through its purpose-built and appropriately-equipped hospitals provide comprehensive eye-care, ranging from simple refraction to the most advanced retinal surgery and corneal transplants. We have highly skilled doctors complemented with cutting edge technology and to add to every patient, however poor, is treated with compassion and dignity. The LFCT continues to support simple, yet vastly expensive – for its poor patients – cataract operations so that hard working individuals may be able to continue working for their families and their future and not have to worry about how they would pay for the operation. Thank you for the continued support of LFCT donors towards this work giving people the back gift of sight.  
16th
Jun
2016

EXCITING NEWS UPDATE: Expansion of the LFCT Micro Finance Project into a Girls School for Orphans. Selling garments and helping to feed the students – Full self-sustainability is on the horizon!


June 2016 a b Popularity of LFCT’s UNIQUE Micro Finance Project in Iraq is gaining momentum. Al-Salihat is a Secondary School where there are orphans; refugees and other local children from the Holy City of Karbala. The school is one of the best academic schools in Kerbala with good principals and staff. The school provides modern lessons to the students such as computer lessons, English Language and additional activities that enhance the academic studies including participating in handicrafts in regular exhibitions that happen in the school. Al-Salihat Girls Academy has just this month won the first position in a girls scout parade held in the Karbala province in January 2016. Even though it is a relatively new school, Al-Salihat Academy has achieved great accomplishments in creating many opportunities for its students. The school consists of 95 students, 73 of them are orphans, 22 are non-orphans, 10 are Saddah and 85 are Non-Saddah. The orphans are not paying any fees for the school. The school opens 6 days a week from 8am – 2pm, approximately 250 days a year, which, in comparison to the governmental schools is nearly 90 days more. The students spend all day in the school during which they pass through two mealtimes (breakfast and lunch). Up until now there has been a donor that has covered their daily lunch but unfortunately the donor has stopped supporting the school because of a lack of funding. During the last trip to Iraq, a Trustee of LFCT visited the school for the third time. During his visit the Principal of the school made an appeal to LFCT to donate towards the cost of lunch.   This sparked an idea off for the Trustee and he questioned why the school could not start a Garment Micro Finance Project, an outlet similar to the one in Lebanon/Iraq which has been running very successfully with widows. All of the widows that are taking part, as of today, nearly 400, have started earning additional income with pride and dignity For Al-Salihat Secondary School, starting the microfinance project means they can start generating income which can be used towards the cost of lunch. The more that is sold, the more income the school will get. In so doing, the school will no longer have to look for the donors and or depend upon donors. The school will be generating income and be self-sufficient in certain aspects including lunch for its students.   The Principal of the school is delighted and the shop has been established at the school. As soon as the school re-opens in September 2015 for the new school year, all the teachers will get involved in selling the garments which are stitched by Widows and Poor sisters from Lebanon. Two teachers will lead this project, Um Ahmed and by assistance of Miss Ghasaq and they will have a secure cash box to make sure the project is properly governed and professional. The sisters at the project in Lebanon have stopped relying on hand outs and are now proud that they are earning their living with dignity. There are 25 widows and poor sisters asking for employment at the LFCT’s workshop in Lebanon. We expect a similar level of success at the school.   The LFCT sees this as a great opportunity to spread the success of the microfinance project. LFCT hopes more widows will join the scheme and with the opening of the second outlet, sales will increase which will enable them to employ more widows and poor sisters to start earning their living with dignity.   LFCT donors are requested to donate generously towards this UNIQUE projects towards operational expenses whilst it becomes established and moves towards full self-sustainability.   Thank you.   Signed by Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, Head of LFCT’s Micro Finance Project, Karbala
20th
Jun
2016

A further ten water supply schemes desperately needed in Pakistan – Please help provide a family with water during Ramadan 1437 AH


June 2016 1 2 3   “The geography of Pakistan varies greatly, ranging from arid deserts to remote mountainous regions. This makes accessing safe water extremely difficult for the poorest people. 16 million people in Pakistan don’t have access to safe water,” (WaterAid, 2016)   Summary: It is estimated that approximately 200,000 children in Pakistan die every year of diarrheal diseases alone, (Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resource). This is often before a child reaches their fifth birthday.   Pakistan faces a great shortage of drinkable water. This is a far cry to how Pakistan was in the past. Just a few decades ago it was a water rich country, however, a recent World Bank Report labels Pakistan as one among 17 other countries that currently face a water shortage.   It is pertinent to mention here that the major source of drinking water in Pakistan is groundwater, so water availability is the second most serious issue.   Groundwater is the most common source of drinking water in Pakistan. Levels of groundwater are falling which lead to insecurity water scarcity and insecurity, particularly for rural communities. Hand pumps provide up to 70% of water supplies in rural areas.   Together with the Pravalli Welfare Trust, the LFCT would like to provide the funding support for a further ten schemes providing vital drinking water to rural communities. We need your help to for this.   The communities to be served are remote and isolated, often on steep hillsides in arid surroundings. Often the localities can only be reached by foot or on horseback and this is often the route for fetching water – a job that is left predominantly to the women in the communities.   Each scheme will differ depending on its needs, geography and size of settlement and where villagers can afford it, they will provide the workforce and contribute to raw materials.   The scheme are due to be completed in August and they will bring relief and health. Women will no longer have to make perilous journeys down steep mountain sides to fetch water and can instead use the time on income generation and preparing for their future.   Schemes:  
13th Proposed water supply schemes for LFCT dedicated to Bibi Sakina. June 2016 to August 2016. Project co-ordinator: Pravalli Welfare Trust
NO Details of scheme proposed Cost of the Project Cost of the Project
1 In mohalla Sehr Dherian of village Rahi people have to collect from water pit located down in the valley. Through this scheme the water will be pumped to the houses located on the ridge. Place has about 12 houses with 70 people living there. PKR 40,000.00 £268.30
2 In mohalla Tando of village Narhotar water is to be pumped from a well located in valley to houses at an higher elevation. They will be provided with electric pump and pipe. This locality is inhabited by 10 houses with 60 people living there. PKR 40,000.00 £268.30
3 Hand pump in Upper Mohra- Nara area. Here the people living will make the bore and they will be provided with the Hand pump. The place has about 10 houses and comprises of 60 people. PKR 35,000.00 £234.75
4 Phhagwari Kangran Maira is a location that has 15 houses and water is far below in abundance. They will be provided with 3500 feet pipe and electric pump to pump the water to 16 houses with a population of 100 people. PKR 60,000.00 £402.40
5 Thar desert area in Sind province is short of water. People have to migrate when water is short. They need water bores in remote villages. They will be provided Water bore that goes up to 110 to 140 feet deep. PKR 60,000.00 £402.40
6 Thar desert area in Sind province is short of water. People have to migrate when water is short. They need water bores in remote villages. They will be provided Water bore that goes up to 110 to 140 feet deep. PKR 60,000.00 £402.40
7 Ratta galli locality near village khuian has 10 houses with a population of about 60 people. Government made hand pump far from village where water was available. Now they want this water to be pumped to their houses. We shall instal electric pump and pipe in the scheme. PKR 35,000.00 £234.75
8 Tarkhani khuian locality near village khuian has 9 houses with a population of about 50 people. Governmentt made hand pump far from village where water was available. Now they want this water to be pumped to their houses. We shall instal electric pump and pipe in the scheme. PKR 40,000.00 £268.30
9 Rupar is a small village that has acute water shortage. The villagers will make water well themselves. Thereafter they will be provided with hand pump. The locality for which this facility will be provided has 15 houses with a population of 100 people. PKR 40,000.00 £268.30
10 Kals Lora has a water source much below the houses. They want the water to be pumped to their houses with the help of electric pump. They will be provided with pump and pipe. The locality is inhabited by 12 houses and has population of 70 people. PKR 40,000.00 £268.30
Total Cost PKR 450,000.00
Previous Balance PKR 99,429.00
To be sent now. PKR 350,571.00
  Comments from villagers: “Our village comprising of 15 houses is at a great height from the water source and our women have to walk twice a day to fetch water from a water pit. The total distance one way is half a km. We need a pump and pipe to bring this water to our houses. We request our brothers and sisters to help us in this scheme. Jazak Allah.” “All our houses are located on the hill ridge and all have water problem. Our women have to walk a long distance every day to get water for the family. We need your help to pump it from the source to our locality and save this back breaking work. Allah will reward you for this act of kindness.”   LFCT donors please give generously to this scheme today and give water this Ramadan month. Thank you.  
1st
Jan
1970

Job creation to help two families with members with a disability in Lebanon. Giving a helping hand up, not a hand out


June 2016  

1

Ibrahim Khalil Asaad is 58 years old. He lives in Nabatieh Fawka, South Lebanon. He is married with a wife and two sons aged 16 and 15 years old. Both of his sons work to support the family.

Family data:  
Ibrahim Father/ Applicant 05/07/1958 He used to work oven and stove maintenance $0.00
Rukaya Shaar Wife 01/09/1966 Housewife $0.00
Khalil Son 29/04/2000 Learning Aluminum Industry in workshop $0.00
Hassan Son 21/04/2001 Learning Glasses Industry in workshop $0.00
  When Ibrahim was seven months old he suffered with a bad fever. This fever turned out to be polio.  Polio I a serious viral infection. Although polio often passes quickly without causing any other problems, it can sometimes lead to persistent or lifelong difficulties.   About 1 in every 200 people with the infection will have some degree of permanent paralysis, and others may be left with problems that require long-term treatment and support, such as:
  • muscle weakness
  • shrinking of the muscles (atrophy)
  • tight joints (contractures)
  • deformities, such as twisted feet or legs
  There’s also a chance that someone who has had polio in the past will develop similar symptoms again, or worsening of their existing symptoms, many decades later.   When Ibrahim was first diagnosed, he received treatment and was able to walk with a lamed foot.  He used to work in stove maintenance and repairing. He was able to carry butane bottles and deliver to residential houses.   In 2008, while he was working in a hotel at Rouche in Beirut, he fell down and his foot became Gooseneck – buckled and bent so that it was difficult for him to move about. The LFCT supported Ibrahim from 2008 – 2011 to undergo corrective osteotomy (Trans-Metatarsal) of right foot where he had internal fixation using pins and external fixation using external skeletal fixation device to correct the foot.   Ibrahim used to use a wheelchair but his health is deteriorating and he can no longer rely on a chair and other people for help. He can no longer move alone so he needs an articulated knee ankle foot orthotics to be fitted to stabilize his knee. This device will help him to walk again without any help from a wheelchair.   Although he has tried since 2011, Ibrahim has failed to raise the funds he needs to get the articulated knee ankle orthotics and he has knocked the door of LFCT to help him to walk again and to work in LFCT- Manessa stitching workshop for USD 300.00. Here he will clean threads from stitched finalized items and pack them up – this sort of a job will be suitable to his situation. We have looked for a driver and we have found one who is ready to collect Ibrahim in the morning and afternoon but he needs USD 200.00 per month.   The driver actually has a daughter with a disability himself and so this will bring him in a stable income and he will be sympathetic to Ibrahim’s disability. In such case we are going to support two critical families with handicapped members.   Ibrahim is appealing for the following support for a period of 2 years:
  1. USD 1,040.00 for Knee Ankle Foot orthosis -Ankle Joint -Knee Joint -Plastic KAFO Molded to patient Model
  2. USD 500.00 per month USD 200 for transportation
USD 300 for Ibrahim’s salary   Dear LFCT donors, please give generously to this project today. Through this project we can support two families in need and do it in a sustainable way, through the creation of two jobs. Thank you for your support and help for Ibrahim and a drive today.   Signed: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab. Chair Lady / Managing Trustee Manessa Association, Lebanon
21st
Jun
2016

‘Sweet water’ for 600 households (approximately 3,300 people) in arsenic stricken Bangladesh – DAM UK: Project Proposal to The Lady Fatemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust


June 2016 1 2 “It would really make the world of difference to us if we were to get fresh, safe, sweet water. This landowner is very fortunate that he can bare to give up the precious land for the benefit of the community. This is one less hurdle for us to get through. I have lived in this village my whole life and work as a teacher in the school close by. We would all benefit so much, the whole community, if we were to get this plant. I pray for our village to be healthy with sweet water to nourish us,” Humira, village resident.   An estimated 43,000 people die each year from arsenic-related illness in Bangladesh (Human Rights Watch, 2016)   Primary objectives: Installation of a pump and filtering system to provide safe water to approximately 3,300 people/600 households living in an arsenic and saline contaminated village, Middle Moutola, in Moutola Union, Satkhira District, South West Bangladesh, thus improving their health and opportunities.   Implementation period: Once the water filter has been installed, the project will be self-sustaining.  Initially it will require one year to install the plant properly together with capacity building of entrepreneurs and community.   Project summary: The installation of an entrepreneur managed pump and filtering system to provide safe water to approximately 3,300 people living in a saline and arsenic contaminated area in Satkhira, South West part of Bangladesh, thus improving their health and opportunities.   Project description: On a recent visit to Bangladesh, Emma Crump, Programme and Funding Manager of Dhaka Ahsania Mission UK visited a Middle Moutola village in Moutola Union, Satkhira District, Bangladesh who were appealing for fresh, clean water. The whole village had gathered to discuss their needs. At present, the villagers collect water from a hand pump (tube well) within the centre of the village, but this is arsenic contaminated, with very intermittent flow which is brackish. The hand pump is fine for use as water for clothes washing but is not fit for human consumption – still, at present it is the only source of ‘drinking’ water near to the village. Drinking this water, the village are silently poisoning themselves with arsenic and their children are suffering constant bouts of diarrhoea and stomach upset.   The village itself is settled on the side of a main road, close to a local market, a primary school and secondary school all within 1km. The village has identified a site that has been generously donated by a land owner for use as the site for a plant.   The village have spent some time drawing up maps of their village to indicate where the plant would be located in relation to the village and local area. The village itself stretched for 1.5km’s from the edge of the road. The villagers have also conducted a water users survey to ascertain who would use the plant if it were to be installed, where users currently fetch water from and how this impacts their daily life.   Project design: Through the village maps, survey and discussion with the villagers it became clear that there was a real need for a reverse osmosis (RO) plant and one that was large enough to serve the whole community and not just the village. It became clear that if a ‘normal’ RO output plant was installed (500ltr per hour), that it would not meet the demand of the village or the community. The plant would be used by the nearby community and schools as there simply is no other option for clean water. If this were to be installed it would be the first and only option in the vicinity.   It was decided that a larger plant should be installed to meet this demand. The land that has been donated is large enough to accommodate a plant with double the capacity at 1000ltr per hour.   During the discussion, it also surfaced that, given the learning from other plants that have been installed, that a simple queuing system should be included. The discussion also led onto to how the problem of the village’s furthest residents, who live 1.5km away from the proposed plant site could access the water without travelling across the whole village. A solution was proposed that would BE cheaper than piping a supply; a moto-rickshaw could be funded (also leading to an employment opportunity) to transport the water across the village for another mobile distribution point.   Saline and arsenic contamination in Bangladesh and the need for this project: Bangladesh has a population of 145 million in a country with a total area of 147 thousand square kilometers, making it the most densely populated country in the world. The majority of the population lives in rural areas where shallow groundwater extracted through hand pumps and deep tube wells is the principal source of household water. Naturally-occurring arsenic contamination of groundwater is a major problem and the country faces a public health crisis with as many as 70 million people possibly at risk from prolonged use of arsenic-contaminated water. Drinking water rich in arsenic over a long period (5 – 20 years) leads to arsenic poisoning and various other health implications including discolouration to the skin, skin cancer, bladder, kidney and lung cancers, diseases of the blood vessels in legs and feet, and diabetes, high blood pressure and reproductive disorders. Absorption of arsenic through the skin is minimal and thus hand-washing, bathing and laundry, etc. with arsenic contaminated water do not pose human health risks (WHO, 2001).   Case reports on the situation in various countries have been compiled and the arsenic problem in Bangladesh in particular has prompted more intensive monitoring in many other countries. In Bangladesh, 27 % of shallow tube-wells have been shown to have high levels of arsenic (above 0.05mg/l) and it has been estimated that 35 – 77 million of the total population of Bangladesh are at risk of drinking contaminated water (WHO, 2002). Approximately 1 in 100 people who drink water containing 0.05 mg arsenic per litre or more for a long period may eventually die from arsenic poisoning or related cancers. (WHO, 2001).   In Bangladesh there are 13 districts in the coastal belt where ground water is also contaminated with saline and people are suffering badly from lack of fresh water. Another problem is saline intrusion. In Bangladesh there are 13 districts in the coastal belt where ground water is also contaminated with saline due to climate change, cyclones, shrimp culture and rising sea levels. Here, communities greatly suffer from the lack of fresh water. Salinity has become a typical environmental issue in all coastal areas of Bangladesh and is the single most significant problem in the South western coastal belt of Bangladesh with the worst salinity conditions reported from the Satkhira, Khulna, Bagerhat and Patuakhali Districts. The principal source of household water, water supplies drawn from hand pumps, contains saline and arsenic far higher than the recommended limit. There are few purification treatment facilities available in the rural areas and people are forced to use either contaminated tube well water or polluted surface water from ponds, canals and rivers.   In 2002 the WHO recognized health impacts of consumption of highly saline waters as a priority for investigation under its public health initiatives (WHO 2003). Drinking water with high levels of salinity can have particular impacts for those who need to limit their daily salt intake, such as those with severe hypertension, diabetes, dialysis patients and pregnant women. In a survey conducted in 2008, higher rates of (pre)eclampsia and gestational hypertension in pregnant women living in the south-western coast of Bangladesh, compared with non-coastal pregnant women, were hypothesized to be caused by saline contamination of drinking water (Khan et al. 2008).   3                 Expected Results
  • Safe arsenic and saline free drinking water for approximately 3,300 people (600 households) at an affordable cost that will be mutually agreed (the tariff will be set through discussions with the community). Charging a small amount for water means the plant can become self-sustaining;
  • Lower infant mortality; higher longevity among community generally;
  • Better health leading to increased ability to earn livelihoods, attend school, increase income and opportunities;
  • An earning opportunity for an entrepreneur within the community who will operate and maintain the system and make it sustainable for continuous supply of safe drinking water;
  • A model scheme that will encourage other communities to take up similar initiatives.
  Management Overall supervision will be by DAM Bangladesh project staff, who will manage the installation of the filters and oversee community management and entrepreneur development of its operation. The system will be professionally installed by the Bangladeshi company, Water Mate & Technology that supplies the arsenic and saline removal plants. Water Mate & Technology will also provide training to community members/operator and entrepreneur on its operation and maintenance. DAM Bangladesh has been working to improve the water supply and sanitation conditions in rural Bangladesh for several years and has implemented many projects across the country to ensure safe drinking water and healthy sanitation systems for disadvantaged communities. Developing low-cost and user-friendly ways of treating arsenic and saline contaminated water for safe use by rural poor is a key part of this work.   The Entrepreneurial Model The field coordinator and water engineer assigned to the project are responsible for the overall supervision of the plants on behalf of the community and entrepreneurs. At regular intervals, dialogue between the entrepreneur (as pump operator), the water engineer and the field coordinator allows for suggestions and feedback regarding operation and quality control procedures. Furthermore, a monitoring system has been developed at the field level through the guidance of the central team to measure the functionality and success of the plant. Water production and distribution are monitored, measured and recorded by the entrepreneur and reported and discussed with the field coordinator, water engineer, accountant and community committee. The project accountant collects the income and expenditure breakdown from the plants and sends to the central office at regular intervals. Community committees, elected as a wider body to govern over individual plants, will also report on any developments/changes/problems i.e. people underpaying. This two tiered system allows for constant monitoring from the local and central levels.   Will there be enough money generated by the business to cover the salary of the entrepreneur and cover equipment replacement costs?   A fee is charged for water usage and the money generated is sufficient for paying the entrepreneur’s salary and meeting other expenditures (i.e. electricity bill).The surplus money is deposited into a bank account for the plant and designated for future use such as repair and maintenance.   From similar, current DAM projects, this system is working extremely well and it has been observed that after plant installation, project staff and committee members take the initiative for the maintenance and repair of the plants, in the first instance, using the money from the designated bank account.   What happens when the equipment eventually needs replacing? To what extent is this monitored? The equipment will eventually need to be replaced. When this is the case, a new set up will be installed replacing the old one. The cost will be met, again, from the money generated from the sale of water and deposited in the bank account. As the current plants are running on profit, DAM do not foresee any problems raising the money for replacement plants in the future. The robust monitoring system involving multiple parties means that the maintenance of plants is a continual, monitored process.   Budget: Cost per head: £4.43  
ITEM UNIT COST No. TOTAL  COST
Plant Installation Cost
Arsenic and Saline Removal Plant Per plant £9,325.00 1 £9,325.00
Test boring/test tube well (approx. 250-300 ft) Per plant £172.00 1 £172.00
Electricity connection with all necessary equipment Per plant £172.00 1 £172.00
Land agreement and land development Per plant £86.00 1 £86.00
Water quality testing (Arsenic, TDS, Chloride, Fe, Hardness) for site selection and after plant installation (site selection 15 sample, and after plant installation 6 per plant Per plant £8.00 21 £168.00
Development of plant complex and waste water disposal Per plant £58.00 1 £58.00
Test run, inauguration and commissioning including generator charge, decorations, sign board, marble stone, etc. Per plant £76.00 1 £76.00
Sub-total £10,057.00
Community Development and Capacity Building of Entrepreneur
Sharing meeting with Ward members, Union Parishad and Department of Public Health 2 per plant £4.00 2 £8.00
Community meeting with villagers for site selection, agreement, contract signing, etc. 3 per plant £4.00 3 £12.00
Meeting for local entrepreneur selection 1 per plant £4.00 1 £4.00
Capacity building of local entrepreneur and operator for water distribution, tariff collection, maintenance and plant management Per plant £34.00 1 £34.00
Awareness raising session for community and local school on safe water, hygiene, etc. 2 per plant £4.00 2 £8.00
Market development activities with entrepreneur (brochures, logos, banners, campaign announcement, tea stall meetings, etc.) Per plant £100.00 1 £100.00
Community situation analysis and identifying existing source of water options and existing businesses Per plant £45.00 1 £45.00
Sub-total £211.00
Staff costs        
Project Engineer (part cost) Monthly £92.00 12 £1,104.00
Field Coordinator (part cost) Monthly £58.00 12 £696.00
Administrator/Accounts Officer (part cost) Monthly £30.00 12 £360.00
Field facilitator (community & market development) (part cost) Monthly £30.00 12 £360.00
Support staff (part cost) Monthly £15.00 12 £180.00
Monitoring officer (part cost) Monthly £30.00 12 £360.00
Sub-total £3,060.00
Travel Expenses & Daily Allowances
Project Engineer and other staff from Central Watsan Office (part cost) Day £8.00 6 £48.00
Field Manager and Field Coordinator (part cost) Monthly £20.00 12 £240.00
Field facilitator (part cost) Monthly £20.00 12 £240.00
Support Staff (part cost) Monthly £8.00 12 £96.00
Sub-total £624.00
Office and Management Costs
Communications, office supplies, meetings, etc. Lump sum £100.00 1 £100.00
Local field office monitoring (1 after installation plus 1 after 9 month trial period) 2 times £12.00 2 £24.00
Audit NGOAB GoB 2 times £20.00 2 £40.00
Bank charges Lump sum £12.00 1 £12.00
Overall monitoring, learning, evaluation and management (including travel, design and coordination of reporting, learning and evaluation) See description £500.00
Sub-total £676.00
TOTAL £14,628.00
 
23rd
Jun
2016

APPEAL: Lebanese citizens and Syrians refugees alike struggling to source their nightly Iftar. LFCT donors, please provide a family in need with Iftar this evening


June 2016 1 2 3 Ramadan is a month for spending time with family, knowing that through the fasting days you can have nightly Iftar with your loved ones. Unfortunately, for some families in Lebanon this Ramadan the fasting is made additionally challenging as there is great worry and uncertainty over where their nightly Iftar will come from. Instead of sharing sweets and buying Eid clothing, some families are knocking on the doors of different NGOs and collecting leftovers from restaurants for Iftar.  Five years of the crisis in Syria have had a huge impact in Lebanon as the country is now home to as many as 2 million Syrian refugees. There are 4 million Lebanese living in Lebanon, and with the added population of the Syrian refugees, this rapid percentage increase from the refugee population is a serious burden on Lebanon’s economy and Lebanon cannot afford to increase public debt. There is increasing pressure on services in Lebanon and it struggles to support its own inhabitants who live below the poverty line and the Syrian refugees who flee to the country with barely any possessions of their own, traumatized and homeless. The Lebanese government and private citizens have been hospitable to the Syrian refugees; Lebanese families have taken Syrian families into their homes when possible. Kelley noted that Lebanon is not even the size of Maryland, yet UNHCR registers between 11,000 and 15,000 Syrian refugees per week. She said this large influx is difficult to accommodate and thus refugees are often living in abandoned buildings without walls or bathrooms, unfinished tented settlements, garages, unfinished sheds, and settlements in flood zones. UNHCR has tried to improve these settlements by finishing the abandoned buildings, sealing off tents, establishing hygiene facilities, and moving settlements to safe grounds (Wilson Center, 2013).   In Lebanon this Ramadan both poor Lebanese families and Syrian refugees alike are struggling. Poor Lebanese are struggling as incomes have dropped but prices continue to increase and the country faces a recession. Syrian refugees have found huge cuts in their support. Both are struggling to feed their children and are unable to meet their needs. We would like to bring some relief this Ramadan to residents in Lebanon whether they be poor Lebanese families or Syrian refugees. We would like to provide:
  1. Ramadan Iftar food baskets, filling children’s starving bellies US$ 33.00 per basket
  2. Provide clothes as an Eid gift US$ 4.00 – US$ 8.00 per family member
This will lift the spirits of residents in Lebanon and boost morale. This Ramadan please reach into your pockets and provide what you can towards these struggling families in Lebanon. For the price of a sandwich you can provide an Eid gift of clothing and brighten up the recipient’s world. Thank you LFCT supporters. Signed by: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Chair Lady / Managing Trustee, Manessa Association, Lebanon
24th
Jun
2016

APPEAL: Three bone marrow transplants and huge sacrifices by the whole family later, Afif is hoping for a full recovery.


June 2016 1 2 Please help cover their final instalment of fees for his life saving treatment. Afif Hasan Shouman is 35 years old. He resides in Zifta in North Lebanon. He lives with his large extended family and under any normal circumstances would expect to be bringing in a good income to the family. Unfortunately, he has been suffering with cancer for the past five years meaning he has put his life on hold and lives in limbo. The family are faced with an additional difficulty that being poor, they have struggled to afford Afif’s treatment over time. Furthermore, the youngest brother, Hadi has Epilepsy problems and is on medication himself that costs the family each month. Family data:
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Hasan Shouman Father 63 Non-Working $0.00
Fadia Daher Mother 52 Non-Working $0.00
 Afif Shouman Applicant 35 Non-Working $0.00
Ahmad Shouman Sibling 24 Student- Waiter in a Restaurant $800.00
Hussein Shouman Sibling 30 Student- Waiter in a Restaurant $800.00
Hadi Shouman Sibling 18 Student $0.00
Afifa Shouman Sibling 36 Married-Non Working $0.00
Afif Hasan Shouman Grandfather deceased Elderly $0.00
Afifeh Haidar Grandmother deceased Elderly $0.00
Samar Shouman Aunt 52 Married-Non Working $0.00
  Afif has been suffering with Hodgkins Lymphoma.   The NHS describes this type of cancer as, “An uncommon cancer that develops in the lymphatic system, which is a network of vessels and glands spread throughout your body. The lymphatic system is part of your immune system. Clear fluid called lymph flows through the lymphatic vessels and contains infection-fighting white blood cells, known as lymphocytes.   In Hodgkin lymphoma, B-lymphocytes (a particular type of lymphocyte) start to multiply in an abnormal way and begin to collect in certain parts of the lymphatic system, such as the lymph nodes (glands). The affected lymphocytes lose their infection-fighting properties, making you more vulnerable to infection.   The most common symptom of Hodgkin lymphoma is a painless swelling in a lymph node, usually in the neck, armpit or groin.”   Afif was admitted in July 2013 to AUBMC, Lebanon for 23 days for an Autologous Bone Marrow transplant (BMT) after which he needed several cycles of chemotherapy (Gemzar/ Navelbine). The family incurred a cost of US$ 25,000.00.   Afif’s body did not cope well with the transplant and he developed several complications including low immunity and dropped level of platelets which required several admissions to the emergency unit and blood transfusions. This was a very stressful and upsetting time for the whole family.   Accordingly, another cycles of chemotherapy started by the end of 2013 where a very costly medication called “Brentuximab (IDIS Adcetris) was ‘deemed necessary’. This medication was neither covered by National Social Security Fund (NSSF) nor provided by the Ministry of Health (MOH). A private company secured the drug from abroad with an approximate cost of $17,300 for each dose. Afif needed four doses of this medication thus the family incurred a cost of almost US$ 70,000.00   After the Brentuximab, Afif was ready to undergo another bone marrow transplant, this time an Allogeneic BMT from his brother who was found to be a perfect match. He was admitted in June 2014 for 32 days. The family had to secure additional US$ 26,000.00. This now meant two of their sons were undergoing risky and life changing operations at this time.   Several PET scans were done (at a cost of $1,000 each) to be able to monitor the progress of the transplant. The results were not found to be positive as several radioactive elements were shown. Accordingly, Afif went through a third BMT on 20/10/2015 where cells were taken from his other Brother, who was non-matching brother with a total cost of almost US$ 25,000.00   What a traumatic experience this whole family has gone through.   Total costs up to date amounted to US$146,000.00. The family settled a huge amount with still unsettled balance of US$ 4,875.00. They have sold their belongings and borrowed money wherever they can for this.   Afif has had three bone marrow transplants, and although he is now in complete remission, he must still have monthly monitoring; lab tests and pet scans plus mediation to keep him healthy and strong. The estimated cost of this monthly treatment to reduce the chances of his cancer returning is 1,654,000LBP monthly / £797. His journey is not yet over.   Dear LFCT donors, the family have been through terrible trauma and the outstanding balance is still US$ 4,875.00. They are appealing for support this June to pay off this final instalment of costs for Afif’s treatment. Please help to cover these costs and give Afif and his family peace of mind. They have sacrificed so much to make sure Afif was properly treated.   Thank you.
29th
Jun
2016

Education Support Program for Muhammad Hussain Waris who wishes to complete his Bachelor degree of Telecommunication Engineering


June 2016 1   Dear LFCT donors please donategenerously towards this needy student to make his future brighten   “Ignorance is dangerous but knowledge without responsibility is more dangerous”  
Name Muhammad Hussain Waris
Father Syed Waqar Hussain Naqvi
University COMSATS IIT, Lahore Campus
Studying BS Telecommunication Engineering – Final Semester
  Madinatul Ilm charitable trust (MICT) through the kind support of Lady Fatemah Trust (LFT) is seeking to raise funds for Muhammad Hussain Waris who is attending the final semester of an eight semesters program of BS (TE) at COMSATS University, Lahore Campus. Though from an impoverished background, Hussain Waris hopes to obtain a graduate degree of Telecommunication Engineering and embark on a career where he will be able to take care of his financially challenged family.   Family Background & Financial Condition:- Muhammad Hussain Waris belongs to low income family of District Jhang of Pakistan’s Punjab province. His father, Syed Waqar Hussain Naqvi is unemployed from the last two years and he had his own business in the past but unfortunately he abandoned this business due to continues heavy loss from the last two years. Syed Waqar Hussain is altogether responsible for supporting two children including Hussain Waris, making it highly difficult for him to afford son’s education at COMSATS University, Lahore Campus. Because of his family’s financial challenges, Hussain Waris faces the risk of discontinuing his education. Hussain Waris didn’t submit his university fee from the last two semesters due to this financial situation. Faced with deep financial distress, Hussain Waris needs your financial support. As before, Madinatul Ilm Charitable trust with the backing of lady Fatemah trust will regularly monitor the academic progress of this student and provide regular updates to donors.   Family Details of Hussain Waris:  
Name Age (Years) Status Occupation
Syed Waqar Hussain 55 Father Unemployed
Farhat bano 49 Mother Housewife
M Hussain Waris 21 Applicant Student
Syed Hussain Noor 16 Brother Student
  Financial Details of Hussain Waris:- The table below shows the details cost of his BS (TE) degree classes at COMSATS University– Lahore Campus.  
Total fee payable to University for final settlement & Degree PKR 281,000.00
In US Dollars $ 2683.00
GB Pounds  £ 2004.00
EURO € 2420.00
  He approached MICT for sponsorship.    Your timely support will enable this student to become a useful member of the community.   MICT will provide an update about the progress of Hussain Waris and monitors the case.
4th
Jul
2016

Husam and Karer growing into world citizens in the footsteps of their mother as a strong role Model


July 2016 1 Husam and Karar are just 11 and nine years old. They are one of nearly 6,000 children across the world that become orphans each day.   Nine years ago, they were in Baghdad but they shifted to Kerbala because they faced the sectarian war in Baghdad city. They suffered particularly badly as they belong to a Sada family. Now they live in Kerbala in a simple house with their mother. Last year when their father was on a journey between Baghdad and Kerbala, the family’s lives changed forever.   The brothers father died in a tragic car accident. At the time he was returning from work as a driver. He stayed in hospital for 13 agonising days before passing away.   Before their father died, the family lived in a good condition in comparison to their situation of today. The father bought in a good wage and they lived comfortably. As well as losing her husband, their mother had no source of income and was desperate for help with even the most basic amenities; food, medicine and clothing. She asked around relatives and charitable foundations when she came across the LFCT.   She immediately became enrolled in the microfinance programme, willing to help herself as much as possible and thrive with dignity. She wanted to remain a strong role model for her children. She is selling clothing to her friends and neighbours and when the children need it, she can buy them clothing at a discounted price.   Today, Husam and Karar are studying well in their classes (fifth and the third grades) and are receiving all the support they need courtesy of the LFCT.   There are estimated to be 800,000 children that have lost at least one parent in Iraq. Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history.   Iraq struggles to cope with these sheer numbers of orphans. Innocent children are the ones that suffer the most in Iraq’s ongoing violence. The repercussions can be felt everywhere, rippling out across society. Income generation and schooling is affected and yet with the LFCT’s joint programmes, both widows and orphans can be supported with the view that widows will become long term self-sufficient once their micro-finance business selling clothing begins to grow with their confidence and newly acquired skills.   If orphans are not supported adequately they are at high risk of suicide, up to 15% are estimated to take their own lives before they turn 18 years old. 7 in 10 orphaned boys are likely to become career criminals and girls much more likely to turn to prostitution.   Please help to support an orphan like Husam and Karar today. With your support they can take part in LFCT’s flagship programme and thrive. Please don’t let them become victims. Thank you.   Thank you.   Signed by: Sister Israa Razzaq Al Sikafi and Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar
11th
Jul
2016

APPEAL: “They made me choose between my husband and son – choose which one they should kill”


July 2016 1 2 3 Here we tell the story of a tragedy, a disaster that has happened to 19 families, 96 individuals in Salah Al Din. The families have fled from Mosul where seven men across the 19 families were been brutally attacked and murdered by so called ISIS. Over half of the families are now made up of just widows and their orphans and they are in very bad situation with no electric no water no food. They have fled and were assisted to AlHashid AlSahaabi, The popular mobilization who protected them and sent them to Babylon to safety. They have been given land provided to them by the land owner plus a simple building, In addition, the people around them have assisted with adding some other rooms, the name of the village is Al-Hamam. The families have been left devastated and destroyed. Not only have they lost their husbands and father, but they have had to leave everything they know behind. They need time and assistance to help get them back on their feet. They are appealing to the LFCT donors for that help. Key beneficiary data:
  1. The number of the HHs is 19.
  2. The number of individuals is 96.
  3. There are 7 widows among them all of their husbands had been killed by ISIS.
  4. Two children are suffering from skin diseases in their ears.
  Information of the seven widows:  
No. Name of widow Age Fam. Members M F
1 Karema Hadi Salman 37 11 4 7
2 Rahima Khalaf Turky 30 5 2 3
3 Raghad Na’ema Jawad 27 3 1 2
4 Sheima’a Hussein Aliwe 21 4 1 3
5 Sabiha Hassan Mushchel 18 1 0 1
6 Wafa’a Iksheish Isma’el 32 6 2 4
7  Jassimia Kariem enaad 35 8 2 6
TOTAL 38 12 26
  The source of the information is their representative (Karema Hadi_Um Hussain)   The main needs of the families:
  1. Electric: The area has no electric at all as there are very few inhabitants around. Tormenting, they can see the electric lines, but they feel danger for their lives as the lines lie overhead. Action point: The families are appealing to the LFCT for solar lights with education on how to use them. This will mean they can work and study beyond sundown and increase their chances at a better future for themselves and the wider community.
 
  1. Water: Another NGO in Babil is providing them with two water tanks (1000 litres) and the water directorate has provided them with water once a week. This is far too little for 96 persons to live off and remain healthy.
  To put this into perspective, the WHO states that the absolute minimum is 7.5 litres a day per person, this doubles to 15 litres per person in an emergency situation. Their current supplies means 1000 litres would last barely over a day for these 96 individuals. They are having to manage their water consumption, limit bathing and washing and think about every sip they take.   Action Point: there is a water tap about 500 metres away. This tap under the control of the municipality directorate, who has refused to assist them (as they said). Since learning of LFCT’s partner in Iraq and being contacted by them, he has shown his willingness to assist the families. This is a start but the water is not filtered and is unsafe to drink. Action point: The families are appealing to the LFCT to provide them with a piped water system or LifeSaver Jerry cans (2 or 3) then they can drink water from the tap increasing their access to safe water.  
  1. Latrine: All 19 families, 96 persons are sharing ONE bathroom. Action point: Appealing to the LFCT to provide them with portable bathrooms which cost about $200. This is a temporary solution but one that is urgently needed.
  Rahima’s story Rahima Khalaf Turkey is a widow of four orphans. Rahima explains that ISIS attacked the families in the middle of the night and despite many family members trying to escape and run away, Rahima’s famiy became separated, her husband was with her two daughters and Rahima with her two sons. Rahima escaped, running with her two of her children. Rahima explains that those that didn’t run were killed. She feared the worst. So called ISIS occupied the area and singled out the Shia, asking the Sunni to move on quickly. They separated the men and children, took them to a different place and killed all the people who didn’t run and hide. They tourturned and fired at the women and children. The next day Rahima kept her two children with a family about 20km from her origin and, although she knew she was risking her life, went to her home under the cover of night to look for her husband and daughters. He was sure her husband would have been killed already but searched for her daughters. She went back again the next night to search again and found them sheltering with another family.   Rahima is petrified she will lost her children again and locks the door with chain and lock. Rahima has been very badly affected and is terrified of leaving her children that she stays locked in the shelter and has not been able to negotiate any assistance like other widows. She is living in one room with no kitchen and has access to the shared bathroom; her room also has no electric no water and no glass in the window and door.   Karema’s story Karema Hadi Salman was given the choice by so called ISIS between killing her son or killing her husband, and because her husband was married to three wives she refused to kill her son or her husband, leaving her husband to look after three families. So called ISIS reponded “you are Rafedhia (belong to Ahlulbait a.s.) you have a strong heart to select” and he ordered his group to kill both of them in front of her.   The project:
  • The LFCT has already distributed each family with a solar lamps.
  • We have provided 239 pieces of clothing to the families (see table below)
  We are still hoping to assist the two children with the skin disease. We propose to send them to the doctor and then buy for them plus provide them with the cost of the doctor and the transportation. We are hoping to provide two portable bathrooms. These cost US$ 200.00 /GB£ 154.00 each.   In the future we hope to support the widows with sheep. This will work similar to the goats microfinance but sheep have been identified as the best livestock and one that the widows already have experience in rearing. Here co-operatives will be formed where 2 – 4 families will take turn to look after the goats. The income will then be divided equally between the 19 families. The estimated price of sheep is 200.000 to 250.000 IQD/£13. In the future we also hope to lay a water pipe for constant water supplies. We are in the process of negotiating this with the local authorities.   Clothing provided:  
No Male Female QYN Kind Unit Price Total IQD GBP
Garments from Micro Finance Shop
1 Female 1 year 6 Dress IQD 12,000.00 IQD 72,000.00 £46.50
2 Female 5 year 32 Dress IQD 12,000.00 IQD 384,000.00 £247.95
3 Female 12 year 18 Dress IQD 9,000.00 IQD 162,000.00 £104.60
4 Women 10 Dress IQD 11,000.00 IQD 110,000.00 £71.00
5 Women 10 Dress IQD 10,000.00 IQD 100,000.00 £64.60
6 Women 10 Dress IQD 6,500.00 IQD 65,000.00 £42.00
7 Women 10 Dress IQD 10,500.00 IQD 105,000.00 £67.80
8 Women 10 Skirt 10 IQD 5,500.00 IQD 55,000.00 £35.50
9 Women 10 Shirt 10S IQD 9,000.00 IQD 90,000.00 £58.10
10 Women 10 Dress IQD 8,000.00 IQD 80,000.00 £51.65
11 Men 8 Trousers IQD 2,000.00 IQD 16,000.00 £10.33
12 boys 1 yrs 2 Pyjama IQD 4,000.00 IQD 8,000.00 £5.20
13 boys 3 yrs 9 Pyjama IQD 4,000.00 IQD 36,000.00 £23.25
14 boys 7 yrs 10 Pyjama IQD 1,000.00 IQD 10,000.00 £6.50
15 boys 12 yrs 10 Pyjama IQD 8,000.00 IQD 80,000.00 £51.65
SUB Total IQD 1,373,000.00 £886.63
16 Boys for ages 6-7-8-9 42 T-Shirt IQD 5,000.00 IQD 210,000.00 £135.60
17 Boys for ages 10-11-12 32 T-Shirt IQD 3,500.00 IQD 112,000.00 £72.30
FROM Market IQD 322,000.00 £207.90
FINAL Total 239   IQD 1,695,000.00 £1,094.53
  Dear LFCT donors, please give generously to this appeal. It is no fault of their own that these widows and innocent children find themselves in such awful circumstance. They have faced an awful trauma that no one should ever have to face, let alone a child.   Please help the LFCT and local partner to provide them with a hand up today, enabling them to get back on their feet, recover and thrive as a strong and self-sufficient community.   Thank you.   Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, LFCT Project Manager, Iraq
1st
Jan
1970

EVERY 15 SECONDS A CHILD BECOMES AN ORPHAN


July 2016  In just seven year the number of orphans in Iraq has doubled. It is now estimated to be an astounding 10 million. That is more orphans in Iraq than the whole population of London. 1 2 3 By the time you finish reading this appeal an additional 4 children will have become orphans. ‘Lost daughters and Orphaned children – Iraq has become a tragedy at every turn’, eyewitnesses to Iraq’s misery describe seeing the shattered families and broken homes created by a spiral of death and despair. Imagine a world where through no fault of their own children are left to fend for themselves on the dangerous streets, not knowing when their next meal will be. This is reality for around half of Iraq’s 10 million orphans are living in the streets without shelter or food to survive. Unicef has been warning that children in Iraq are at “serious risk” of death, injury, sexual violence, abduction and recruitment into armed groups. (AP) In its report, ‘A Heavy Price for Children’, Unicef called on warring parties in Iraq to protect children’s rights and said the number of youngsters at serious risk in the country increases. It describes Iraq as “one of the most dangerous places in the world for children”. The report said the 2014 invasion by Islamic State into large areas of Iraq’s north and west and the military operation to unseat them has had a “catastrophic impact”, it said children are also affected by the lack of adequate healthcare, poor public services and the desperate state of education. This is not surprising given that the ratio of doctors to patients is just 7.8:10,000. This is much lower than surrounding Lebanon, Jordan and even Palestine. Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust appeals to all our supporters for urgent sponsorships and donations to help give children the support they need to recover from the horrors of war, aid their welfare and equip them with education, enabling them to live healthier and happier lives and a chance at a better future. You can donate for both Saddah and non-saddah, please specify when donating. Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, LFCT Project Manager, Iraq
13th
Jul
2016

Sister Hira Manzoor was set to complete her graduates in MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery) until a family tragedy threatened Hira’s dream.


July 2016 1
Name Hira Manzoor
Father Manzoor Hussain (Late)
University/College Bannu Medical College, Bannu
Studying MBBS – Final Year
  Hira Manzoor has successfully completed four years of her MBBS course, something she has always dreamed of. She hopes to successfully enroll on the final year thanks to the kind support of LFCT. Hira’s dream is threatened and a family tragedy last year means she is unsure she will ever finish her course.   Hira’s family live in the Chakwal District of Pakistan’s Punjab province. Her father, Manzoor Hussain died of colon cancer suddenly in 2015, leaving behind three children. Her late father was an engineer in private company and earned a good wage.  Hira’s older sister, Farha Manzoor is a doctor in private hospital with a monthly income of approximately PKR 40,000/£288. Although this is a good wage, it is not enough to stretch to Hira’s fees for this final year and Fahra is supporting the whole family at present. Hira has scored well in her latest examination but because of her family’s financial challenges, is not sure if she will ever finish her degree.   Hira is due to pass her final year of the MBBS degree in June, 2017 Insha’ALLAH and she is hopeful to achieve a good job with good salary in future. Amount Sponsored: Hira approached MICT, LFCT’s local partner for sponsorship for her final year fees and with the assistance of the LFCT. The fees total PKR 233,843.00 /£1,685.00 With the assistance of finance to cover the fees Hira can finish her degree and quality as a junior doctor. She will be an asset to her country, providing vital medical care and advice and giving back to her community. Dear LFCT donors, it would be a huge bow to Hira if she were unable to finish her course when she is so close. She has attained solid grades throughout and is set to be a brilliant caring and conscientious doctor given the chance. Please donate to help Hira, and a whole community today. Family data:  
Name Age (Years) Status Occupation
Mumtaz Begum 51 Mother Housewife
Farha Manzoor 32 Sister Doctor
Fahad Manzoor 26 Brother Student
Hira Manzoor 24 Applicant Student
  “Many Thanks and Duas to the LFCT who I pray will support my daughter for her final year educational fees, she is so happy to study,” Mother of Hira Manzoor   Hira Manzoor and her family conveyed their Duas and Thanks to all the Trustees of The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust-UK.
18th
Jul
2016

LFCT brings some relief and hope: Food baskets and clothing for Syrian refugees in Lebanon


July 20162 3 4 The UN has been forced to cut down their aid budget for Syrian refugees by one third. To put this into perspective, 1 in five people in Lebanon is a Syrian refugee. The UN agency has been distributing food vouchers to refugees since the beginning of the crisis in Syria but is facing increasing gaps in funding, “Since the beginning of this operation it has been hand to mouth,” said Etefa, spokesperson for the World Food Programme. “It is nerve-wracking for the refugees and the staff.” (The Guardian, 2015) Food vouchers have dropped drastically and Syrian refugees have no high hopes of receive further assistance.   The Lebanese government has historically maintained an open door policy towards Syrian refugees; however, the UNHCR states that the Lebanese government has never signed the 1951 Refugee Convention which secures a refugees’ welfare and formally recognises them. Although the country is bound by the customary law principle of non-refoulement (not sending refugees back) and by the obligations of the human rights treaties which it has signed and which are incorporated into its Constitution. International standards under these obligations recommend, at a minimum, the adoption of temporary protection measures to ensure the safe admission of refugees, to protect them against refoulement and to respect their basic human rights.   This means although Syrian refugees in Lebanon might have access to some services through the UNHCR, they are unable to register and legally work or self-settle in Lebanon as a refugee. The refugees who are capable of working must compete with the poor of Lebanon for the country’s lowest paying jobs to get work and make money, which has resulted in damage to Lebanon’s economic infrastructure. The children of Syrian refugees must attend schools, which are already crowded with Lebanese children. There are multiple challenges faced every day, the most pertinent being how to afford food and other necessities for survival.   The LFCT has boosted Syrian refugees during month of Ramadan by giving them NOT ONLY food baskets ALSO clothes which came as a huge delight. They were extremely appreciative as there are very limited opportunities to receive new clothes when needed and many have only one spare set. This is far from ideal in a highly mobile situation.   Before the Syrian crisis, the majority of Lebanese people used to go to Syria and supply their families with clothes, food and many other essential items else as prices in Syrian markets used to be 50%-65%  less than in Lebanese market. However, being refugees, they have had to tighten their economic belts to adopt and survive in a higher economy. Their budgets are extremely stretched even to buy food, let alone clothing. Outcomes:
  1. LFCT With a budget of USD $20,300.00, LFCT has provided:
    1. 494 Families with 3,869 members with…
    2. 3384 pieces of clothing at 4$, 6$, 8$ per piece.
    3. Beneficiaries have received clothing including the following groups:
      1. Babies
      2. Toddlers
  • Teenagers
  1. Elderly.
 
  1. LFCT- Manessa Stitching Workshop This project has also empowered the stitching workshop by procuring the items through the workshop itself. This has had the effect of:
    1. Assuring orders with a secured payment
    2. Enabling employees in the workshop to gain more experience by stitching for a wide range of children and adults.
It must be noted that most workshops close during June and July as it is the ‘quiet’ season but the Manessa workshop is at full operational capacity and very busy – this in itself is having a knock on effect on the local economy, keeping their handyman employed, for instance.   Testimonials “I want to put it on immediately – isn’t is nice? It fits well don’t you think!” “Many, many thanks, we really do appreciate”.   By providing these gift of clothing this Eid the LFCT has bought a little bit of relief to the some Syrian refugees living in Lebanon.   Signed: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Chair Lady / Trustee, Manessa Association, Lebanon  
1st
Jan
1970

Thank you LFCT donors – 301 families in Kenya benefit from relief food distributed this Ramadan


July 20162 3 4Brief history: Established in the year 1974, Jaffery Centre, Mackinon Road, along the Mombassa – Nairobi highway, Kwale County, Kinango, Kenya is the first Centre to be established. Serving a community of 301 families, the facilities offered are a Masjid, a Tailoring school, Madressah and a Pre – primary school. Early History: In 1971, Ngala Chuphi -of Duruma Tribe- the then Chief of Mackinnon Road accepted Shia madhab and adopted the Islamic name “Yusuf”. Hundreds of members of his tribe accepted Shia madhab and today the Mission has many Centres in the areas dominated by this tribe.
JAFFERY CENTRE Dist. DISTRICT NO. OF NO. OF STUDENTS TEACHERS
Kms COUNTY FAMILIES PP MADRASAH IRE
MACKINNON ROAD 88 KWALE KINANGO 301 163 303 226 10
Project Summary: Family food parcels were distributed to the villagers of Jaffery Centre in conjunction with Lady Fatemah (as) Trust during the Mahe Ramadhan food relief. Need: About one half of Kenya’s total agricultural output is subsistence production. Although agriculture is the mainstay of the economy, Kenya has a structural production deficit in several staples, including maize. Deficits are filled through formal and informal imports from regional and international markets. Maize is the strongly preferred main staple food, and also the most common crop grown by rural poor households. Other major food crops include beans, tubers (potatoes and cassava). Unfortunately Kenya faces the following recurring problems causing many low income households to worry about where their next meal is coming from:
  • Kenya is vulnerable to a number of shocks including droughts, floods, disease, price volatility, livestock raids, and civil strife.
  • Climate related disruptions to production are a principal cause of instability in the food supply.
  • Agricultural production in Kenya is almost exclusively rainfall dependent, and most farmers are exposed to the risks of unreliable rainfall or prolonged drought.
  • With climate change, droughts are expected to increase both in extent and intensity according to the USAID report issued in March 2016. Without appropriate mitigation measures, these changes will have increasing impact on the stability of the food supply and the potential for households to cope with fluctuating income.
  • Price fluctuations are influenced by dependence on world markets, a heavy reliance on maize as a staple crop, effects of droughts and/or floods, pest and diseases, insecurity, and many other factors that affect the livelihood of the families living in the rural areas. Resource based conflicts in several parts of the country, particularly the highly food insecure rural areas, are a long standing issue with unpredictable impacts on food availability, access and utilisation.
  Distribution process: Food parcels were given according to the family listing.  
ITEMS DISTRIBUTED CONTENT PER FAMILLY PARCEL TOTAL QUANTITY FOR 301 FAMILIES
Maize flour 9 Packets  of 2 Kgs each 226 Bales
Wheat flour 8 Packets of 2 Kgs each 201 Bales
Cooking Oil 3 LITRES 50 Cartons
  Comments from Beneficiaries and stories from the distribution:    “I thank the mission and Lady Fatemah (As) Trust for bringing us this iftar in this holy month of Ramadhan. It has helped us a lot because we do not have food here because of drought. My family feel happy after receiving this gifts. May Allah (s.w.t) bless you a lot,” Zainab Mustafa      “May Allah swt bless the mission and Lady Fatemah (As) Trust for the contribution of the iftar brought to us because here in Mackinon we have a lot of difficulty in getting food,” Riziki  Hamisi   Among many smiling faces we came across an elderly lady in her early 60’s as she sat outside her mud thatched home preparing for iftar, upon receiving the iftar parcel she was deeply grateful and had to say:    “My name is Amina Mbaraka, for many years I have struggled to feed my grandchildren and educate them for their better future. I remain thankful to Bilal Muslim Mission and LFCT that has taken an initiative to aid our troubles and above all assist us with a month supply of food to last us through with ease as we fast during the holy month.”   Her granddaughter, Khadijah is 7 years old and enjoys reading and writing.   We met with Sister Rehema Juma who is in her late 30’s, she is first wife to Brother Juma Ndegwa. Mother of two children, she lives about 10kms from Mackinnon Centre. Despite living far from the Centre Sister Rehema travels to Jaffery Centre for Ibadaath and Amaals that are held at the Centre during the Holy Month of Ramadhan.   Her husband, who runs a mini kiosk, can hardly fend for his family despite doing the best he can. During the rainy season Sister Rehema and her co-wife work hand in hand in their small scale farm for subsistence purposes.   She thanked us for providing her family with a nutritious food basket; she added that the parcel she had received would last her family for the better part of the Holy Month.    “This food will help us. At least during this fasting period we will not worry so much as to what we will be breaking our fast with.’’   Thank you to all LFCT donors who provided for their families as well as their own this Ramadan by providing nutritious iftar. Families have no longer had to worry about where their iftar will come from, bringing them some important relief during the Holy month.   Thank you.        Signed by Ms Nazneen Sameer Shiraz, Secretariat, BMM of Kenya, Mombasa  
19th
Jul
2016

Gaishi Ram had nearly given up on life until he heard of free cataract procedures, courtesy of funding from the LFCT


July 2016    1 2 3   This month we share the story of Gaishi Ram, a hardworking 65 year old from Pakistan. With your help the LFCT is assisting the LRBT in Pakistan to provide free cataract treatment for 40 poor patients each month.   Pakistan is a poor country that lacks the basic infrastructure to provide healthcare for those that need it the most. Medical care is sparse across the country and even simple procedures are ill afforded by the country’s estimated 17% that live below the poverty line. Gaishi Ram, aged 65 happens to be one of the millions in the nation who live below the poverty line and have limited access to basic facilities and healthcare. Gaishi is barely able to make enough to feed his young children who are still unaware of austerity in life that awaits them. He was the sole breadwinner for the family of four. A woodcutter by occupation, he brought home a meager sum of Rs.9, 000/- (less than $90/-) per month.   He was driven by dire need and frustration to LRBT. He had been feeling that he was losing his eyesight for some time, unable to conduct routine tasks and he also was suffering from general poor health. Depressed and hopeless, Gaishi was waiting for the time when darkness would envelope him and he would have to leave everything to God.   Speaking to a friend one day about his ailment, he was told about LRBT’s ‘Free Secondary Eye Hospital’ in Shahpur. Not only was the facility popular for its quality of work, what was amazing was that all of it was completely free of cost – something that Gaishi found difficult to believe. He had to visit this for himself.   A neighbour confirmed the existence of such a place – having himself undergone eye surgery at LRBT. He confirmed that his vision had vastly improved since then and surely, all the treatment was absolutely free of cost. Gaishi was immediately brought to LRBT by family where, after detailed examination, the doctor informed him that he needed cataract surgery – without which, his vision will be lost.   Gaishi Ram’s treatment was successful – like that of all the thousands who come to LRBT each day for surgery and eye care related diseases.   His fate takes a new turn for the better as he is now able to see again and has gone back to his work and is enjoying the bounties and creations of God with a clear vision – all courtesy of funding from the LFCT.   Thank you all LFCT donors who continue to give to this vital project. There are 39 million blind people across the world, yet 80 per cent of blindness could be prevented or cured. That is a staggering 31.2 million people who are blind when it could easily have been avoided. Thanks to you, the LFCT can do their bit to help people with cataracts from not going blind.
1st
Jan
1970

Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children (ASDC), Gaza Appeals to the Lady Fatemah (A.S.) Charitable Trust (LFCT) for assisting 30 Needy Deaf Students towards transportation cost


July 2016
1 2
What does school mean to children? “School is a place where we learn lots of things about life”. This is what school is to most children who are fortunate enough to have a school to go to.  Tens of deaf children in the Gaza Strip would describe school differently. “School is everything, it is a place where we learn, play and talk to other children… just like us, without feeling different and without feeling left out” this is what the children enrolled in the Atfaluna School for the Deaf said when they were asked to describe “School”.   As the siege on the Gaza Strip continues with no near hope of a solution, the Gazan population remains unforgotten under the heavy weight of collective imprisonment, poverty and unemployment. Consequently the deaf community still remains among the poorest of the poor, with the majority of them relying on good doers   to support their day to day needs. “We struggle on a daily basis to make ends meet, we were hopeful for a solution to our suffering and for a better life…. But as the days go by and we get older we realize what we hope for is too optimistic… let’s just pray for a brighter future for our deaf children” stated Ramadan a father of 3 deaf children enrolled at the Atfaluna School.   A total of 295 deaf children are enrolled in the Atfaluna School for the Deaf. They attend school five days a week learning mathematics, English language, Arabic language, Science, Information Technology just to name a few. Outside of classes the students enjoy time chatting to each other and sharing stories using sign language which is the common language within the Atfaluna School building. The children are happy and comfortable within their safe haven of friends and teachers. Outside school the same deaf children are quiet, often lonely and rarely treated equally. This immense difference in their two environments is the main reason deaf children prefer their school over their homes.   Of the 295 students enrolled at Atfaluna School at least 90% of them are hardship cases whose families have barely enough money to provide even the most basic necessities for their families. To be able to provide a decent education for the deaf community in the Gaza Strip and to ensure that parents are not burdened financially, Atfaluna provides education for the children free-of-charge. Through generous supporters Atfaluna provides the deaf children in its care with school uniforms, school bags, stationery supplies, a lunch meal, and assistance in transportation to and from school.   During recent years the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust has supported deaf children with hot meals, transportation, uniforms just to name a few.   Again and as the new academic year approaches Atfaluna seeks assistance from its generous and caring supporters – The Lady Fatemah Trust – to contribute to the financial covering of transportation fees for the neediest of needy deaf children enrolled in the Atfaluna School. The students some of which are siblings have accumulated transportation debts which their families are unable to pay due to their poor financial abilities and are thus being threatened with confiscation from the School bus system thus hindering their education.  
Transportation Needs for Deaf Children
Reducing Transportation Debt and Covering 
Transportation Cost for a Semester
 (September 2016 – January 2017)
No. Student Name Amount Needed (US Dollar)
1 Sara Sekkala $330.00
2 Mohamed Al-Faran $330.00
3 Mohamed Mikbil $330.00
4 Imtiyaz Mikbil $330.00
5 Karim Mousa $330.00
6 Mohamed Al-Jadba $330.00
7 Bilal Abu Rahma $330.00
8 Malak Al-Saeedi $330.00
9 Fadel Shomar $330.00
10 Saja Ghonaim $330.00
11 Mohamed Deeb $330.00
12 Mohamed Abu Aser $330.00
13 Firyal Hasouna $330.00
14 Nagham Al-Ashkar $330.00
15 Mona Al-Arooki $330.00
16 Hamza Al-Arooki $330.00
17 Shayma Al-Jadba $330.00
18 Mohamed Badwan $330.00
19 Marah Abu Dan $330.00
20 Nour Al-Masry $330.00
21 Moutaz Ghonaim $330.00
22 Ameera Abdul Al $330.00
23 Ikram Hajaj $330.00
24 Marah Abu Awad $330.00
25 Enas Kiriki $330.00
26 Waseem Mikdad $330.00
27 Mohamed Abushaban $330.00
28 Khaled Abusakran $330.00
29 Ahmed Al-Kitnany $330.00
30 Bilal Banar $330.00
Total Amount Needed $9,900.00
  Signed by: Ghada Abushahla (Ms.), Projects Officer, Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children
25th
Jul
2016

LFCT brings Ramadan food baskets to Syrian refugees in Lebanon – bringing relief to those in their moment of need


July 2016 3 4 Ramadan should be a time of reflection and family but for many Syrian refugees it is simply a time of despair. Unlike previous years, NGOs working with Syrian refugees, namely this in Lebanon have really scaled back their assistance. For poor Lebanese families and Syrians alike this Ramadan, the LFCT decided it would reach out a helping hand and provide some Ramadan food baskets. No longer would we hear stories of poor Lebanese beneficiaries spending their last Lebanese pound on a bus fair to an NGO office to pick up a food basket, only to return little but empty handed.   Beneficiary comments: “Almahdi be with LFCT and Almahdi increase their Risq”   “May Allah swt reward your good deeds and grant you for your good intension”    “May Allah swt protect LFCT and their kids and all those who have worked for this noble cause”   This Ramadan LFCT and their local partner in Lebanon provided food baskets with enough nutritious food to feed 1,066 individuals. The food baskets included several items which could form the staple food for nutritious iftar during the holy month.   Itemised Budget of Ramadan Food Basket  
No Description Weight/ Grms Quantity Unit Price Total Price
1 Jallab (Ramadan Concentrated Juice) 3300 1         2.87 $2.87
2 Dates 1000 1         2.60 $2.60
3 Corned Beef 850 1         3.67 $3.67
4 Tinned Faba Beans 400 1         0.60 $0.60
5 Tinned Chick Peas Cream 430 3         0.60 $1.80
6 Tomatoes Sauce 300 1         0.67 $0.67
7 Sardines 125 1         0.60 $0.60
8 Tinned Corn 430 1         0.77 $0.77
9 Noodles 9         0.33 $3.00
10 Sugar 5000 1         3.00 $3.00
11 Milk 1000 1         1.33 $1.33
12 Wide Lentil 1000 1         1.13 $1.13
13 Split Lentil 1000 1         1.13 $1.13
14 Oil 5000 1         5.00 $5.00
15 Tea 200 1         2.50 $2.50
16 Vermicelli 700 1         0.67 $0.67
17 Spaghetti 600 2         0.83 $1.67
TOTAL COST OF ONE BASKET $33.00
 
Logistics For Ramadan Food  Baskets Project
Basket 135 £33.00 £4,455.00
Transport £190.00
Laboring Fees £200.00
Total Budget £4,845.00
Received Fund £4,847.50
  The project was overseen by LFCTs local partner who served all the Syrian refugee families they knew of and provide complementary assistance to. Sadly, they were approached by more poor Lebanese families than expected and most of the food baskets were distributed to Syrian refugee families. The whole community is in need in Lebanon as the country struggles to look after the influx of refugees. There simply not being enough food baskets, and more demand than ever from Lebanese families illustrates how the country is finding it hard to cope as services are at breaking point.   It is more important than ever that organisations like the LFCT keep providing vital assistance to Syrian refugees and Lebanese families alike.   Thank you to everyone that donated to the LFCT for this project, with your continued support we can further assist these communities as they face extraordinary challenges and circumstances. Thank you.  
Iftar food basket distribution family data
No First Name: Middle Name Family Name Occupation No of immediate family members D.O.B County/Village
1 Baleegh Hamdi Quddah Labourer 7 1977 Raas El-Ain
2 Usama Mustapha Koja Labourer 8 1976 Raas El-Ain
3 Samira Mizaal Al-gfhabbari Widow 5 1968 Hirak
4 Rami Asif Karroum Labourer 9 1985 Allepo
5 Ahmad Abdo Al-Saleiman Labourer 8 1968 Hirak
6 Ali Muhamad Askar Labourer 7 1976 Hirak
7 Kassem Muhamad Askar Labourer 6 1974 Hirak
8 Imad Muhamad Askar Labourer 6 1979 Hirak
9 Muhamad Abdallah Askar Labourer 9 1960 Hirak
10 Hussein Muhamad Askar Labourer 5 1981 Hirak
11 Nidal Hussein Lateef Labourer 10 1975 Abidiyowi
12 Adnan Fayez Zughbi Labourer 7 1976 Al-Musllameen
13 Abdel Raheem Haytham Qantar Labourer 4 1994 Kafar Shallaya
14 Samira Muhamad Al-Amawi Widow 5 1989 Humus
15 Suad Rushdi Al-Qamih Widow 6 1981 Humus
16 Thurayya Abdallah Al-Amawi Widow 9 1956 Humoub Reeh
17 Rwayda Rushdi Al-Qamih Widow 7 1968 Humus
18 Hanan Mamdouh Sleiman Housewife 4 1993 Humus
19 Bdour Sleiman Sleiman Housewife 2 1999 Humus
20 Walid Mamdouh Sleiman Labourer 4 1986 Humus
21 Zainab Sufyan Bala Housewife 3 1992 Humus
22 Aziza Abdul Razik Kayali Labourer 11 1962 Yarmouk
23 Abdel Naser Muhamad Saad Labourer 12 1963 Yarmouk
24 Firyal Abdel Naser Saad Housewife 5 1987 Yarmouk
25 Fatima Abdel Naser Saad Housewife 4 1988 Yarmouk
26 Muhamad Abdel Naser Saad Labourer 4 1990 Yarmouk
27 Sleiman Mahmoud Sleiman Labourer 18 1967 Humus
28 Mamdouh Mahmoud Sleiman Labourer 14 1959 Humus
29 Hussein Hassan Issa Labourer 11 1966 Yarmouk
30 Ali Hassan Issa Labourer 7 1980 Humus
31 Muhamad Faris Dasho Labourer 13 1963 Yarmouk
32 Abbas Hassan Issa Labourer 10 1964 Allepo
33 Adnan Ali Junayid Labourer 15 1953 Yarmouk
34 Ali Muhamad Sami Labourer 6 1975 Yarmouk
35 Yihya Sleiman El-Feel Labourer 9 1957 Yarmouk
36 Muhamad Adnan Junayid Labourer 4 1983 Yarmouk
37 Ali Adnan Junayid Labourer 8 1974 Yarmouk
38 Ibrahim Ali Bunoud Sheikh 12 1956 Allepo
39 Yihya Muhamad Khamees Labourer 9 1967 Allepo
40 Fattouh Muhamad Khamees Labourer 7 1978 Allepo
41 Amar Yaser Younis Labourer 8 1969 Allepo
42 Muhamad Abdel Wahab Dasho Labourer 9 1969 Allepo
43 Zakariya Muhamad Issa Labourer 12 1966 Allepo
44 Hussein Aziz Mahreen Labourer 7 1966 Allepo
45 Sami Muhamad Masri Labourer 9 1963 Allepo
46 Muhamad Dabbah Ali Labourer 14 1955 Allepo
47 Adnan Khodor Zughbi Labourer 13 1956 Allepo
48 Sabah Ali Tarhini Housewife 10 1960 Allepo
49 Naeyla Ali hariri Housewife 12 1959 Allepo
50 Muhsin Ali Darweech Sheikh 9 1975 Allepo
51 Badr Ali Musawi Labourer 8 1971 Allepo
52 Abdel Wahab Muhamad Dasho Labourer 7 1964 Allepo
53 Ali Faris Dasho Labourer 9 1962 Allepo
54 Yihya Omar Khamees Labourer 6 1973 Allepo
55 Ali Hussein Issa Labourer 7 1966 Allepo
56 Yussef Khodor Masader Labourer 8 1976 Allepo
57 Abdel Wahab Omar Al-Muammar Labourer 9 1968 Allepo
58 Ali Abbas AlHallak Labourer 11 1977 Allepo
59 Hassan Ibrahim Issa Labourer 8 1970 Allepo
60 Yusra Faris Dasho Housewife 6 1979 Allepo
61 Abdel Raheem Abdel Aziz Allawo Labourer 17 1939 Azaz
62 Muhamad Kassem ElKhoulayf Labourer 7 1980 Hirak
63 Wazira Abdel Karim Kuddah Housewife 8 1960 Hirak
64 Adnan Kassem Atma Labourer 7 1978 Sanamayn
65 Amal Fawwaz Rayani Housewife 11 1959 Nawa
66 NourEddine Kassem Suwaydani Labourer 2 1998 Nawa
67 Ahmad Abdo Sleiman Labourer 9 1968 Bzaah
68 Rasmiya Hussein Ibrahim Housewife 12 1963 Nawa
69 Ayat Yussef Jabawi Housewife 3 1999 Deraah
70 Ruqayya Rasmi Ibrahim Housewife 8 1978 Nawa
71 Marwan Muhamad Brakat Labourer 5 1987 Allepo
72 Ismail Muhsin Allouch Handicap 6 1972 Allepo
73 Manal Ata Atma Housewife 7 1977 Sanamayn
74 Aychaa Hilal Hamidi Housewife 8 1963 Rumathiya
75 Fateem Ahmad Issa Housewife 10 1965 Suluqiya
76 Hayla Yussef Awad Housewife 7 1975 Damascus
77 Baraah Sleiman Issa Housewife 2 1998 Hajar Aswad
78 Rabab Ahmad Mujeer Housewife 9 1972 Damascus
79 Fadia Muhamad Ali Housewife 6 1980 Yarmouk
80 Fatima Jamal Zahra Housewife 5 1986 Damascus
81 Ghazala Fayez Hussein Housewife 5 1991 Hamah
82 Mohamad Diaa Saleh Labourer 6 1971 Balshoun
83 Ahmad Khodor Khalaf Labourer 7 1991 Bouwayta
84 Khodor Mohamad Khalaf Labourer 9 1957 Bouwayta
85 Ismail Hamdo Merii Labourer 6 1975 Idlib
86 Mohamad Aqil Ouwayid Labourer 5 1980 Baqar
87 Salim Ali Abd Labourer 3 1988 Atshana Hanzal
88 Abdel Rahman Mahmoud Hashem Labourer 2 1994 Nawa
89 Ahmad Izzedine Issa Labourer 6 1976 Kafar Sajna
90 Ahmad Mohamad Abeed Aeer Labourer 8 1976 Raqqa
91 Muhanad Ahmad Ahmad Labourer 6 1981 Raqqa
92 Ayman Mohamad Jumaa Labourer 9 1977 ElDiyyi
93 Tamim Mustapha Nuhayli Labourer 6 1985 Damascus
94 Mustapha Sleiman Nuhayli Labourer 12 1951 Damascus
95 Saeed Ali Abboud Labourer 5 1987 Baeera
96 Ali Zaher Abboud Labourer 8 1954 Naseha
97 Abdel Razzaq Abdel Hanan Hamidi Labourer 4 1986 Maskana
98 Nidal Abdel Kareem Abu Kharoub Labourer 11 1973 Nawa
99 Abdel Rahman Hubayr Hamooud Labourer 17 1962 Atshana Hanzal
100 Shawi Hussein Faraj Labourer 5 1986 Bara
101 Yussef Ismail Hussein Labourer 12 1967 DizzRabt
102 Issa Yussef Hussein Labourer 4 1988 Izz
103 Awad Maalaq Shaabani Labourer 7 1984 NemerOdwan
104 Hamad Ali Hussein Labourer 7 1981 Raqqa
105 Mahmoud Hamad Hamawa Labourer 9 1973 Habbawiya
106 Fatima Yussef El-Aeysh Housewife 4 1990 Haloul
107 Merii Hassan Khayouti Labourer 11 1962 Nawa
108 Adnan Mohamad Zouk Labourer 5 1985 Hama
109 Suhayla Ibrahim Mahalli Housewife 12 1941 Zara
110 Ibrahim Abdel Hanan Hamidi Labourer 5 1987 Atshana Hanzal
111 Yussef Abdel Razzaq Mohamad Labourer 6 1981 Um Khalakeel
112 Alaa Ali Taza Labourer 5 1981 Jarjsnsr
113 Ali Abed Sagheer Labourer 13 1967 Atshana Hanzal
114 Nasser Abed Sagheer Labourer 11 1975 Atshana Hanzal
115 Hamoud Habeer Hamoud Labourer 15 1960 Atshana Hanzal
116 Abed Khodor Saleh Labourer 5 1987 Aleppo
117 Abdel Raheem Abdel Aziz Allao Unemployed 15 1939 Nubul Zahraa
118 Khodor Mohamad Saleh Labourer 12 1960 Aleppo
119 Abdel Ghani Mahmoud Hamidi Labourer 13 1968 Atshana Hanzal
120 Marwan Abdel Ghani Hamidi Labourer 4 1990 Atshana Hanzal
121 Hassan Ali Fato Unemployed 15 1931 Ain Bayda
122 Sami Turki Kasabra Labourer 3 1993 Damascus
123 Mohamad Mahmoud Atma Labourer 4 1987 Sanamiya
124 Fatima Yussef Atma Housewife 7 1981 Nawa
125 Ahmad Yussef AbuHoub Labourer 9 1979 Taseel
126 Ahmad Mohamad Zahra Labourer 5 1984 Aleppo
127 Mohamad Abdel Razzaq Issa Labourer 8 1979 Aleppo
128 Fadeela Othman Nahlawi Housewife 11 1954 Aleppo
129 Hassan Ismail Merii Labourer 3 1989 Teftnar
130 Ali Mohamad Merii Labourer 8 1976 Teftnar
131 Nader Salah Yassin Labourer 5 1985 Damascus
132 Kassem Abdel Hadi Helo Labourer 10 1970 Damascus
133 Ahmad Mohamad Arnab Labourer 4 1976 Idlib
134 Ahmad Ismail Othman Labourer 7 1974 Idlib
135 Nujud Sattouf Saleh Housewife 11 1961 Tab Abass
Total 1,066
  Signed by: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Chair Lady / Managing Trustee, Manessa Association, Lebanon
1st
Jan
1970

Education is the key to a better future and a route out of poverty – can you sponsor little Jaza continue to her full potential today?


July 2016 Jaza Fatima is eight years old. She lives with her Grandmother, Mother, Father and younger Brother in Lucknow, India.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Mohammad Afsar Father 38 Embroidery worker 14,000.00
Zeenat Jafri Mother 32 Housewife Nil
Jaza Fatima Self & Applicant 8 Student Nil
Mohammad Husain Brother 4 Student Playhouse Nil
Ghayyur Fatima Grand Mother 70 Widow Nil
  Jaza is in the Fourth grade and on her last report card averaged 93.8% pass rate, a fantastic achievement and she is clearly a bright student. She attends the City Montessori School. Jaza’s family are appealing for the LFCT to cover the cost of three years of her tuition for her to finish Primary school. The estimated cost will be 43640 per annum.   The family are a strong and loving unit and want only the best for their children. Jaza’s father the time of getting married was working in Dubai in the embroidery industry and was earning handsomely. The family was doing very well on their own until 5-6 years back. In late 2010, the father lost the job in Dubai and when they came back, the sister suffered a severe kidney infection, finally leading to the removal of one kidney. The treatment continued for almost a year and she was in hospital for a couple of months. The expense of surgery and long hospitalization drained the complete savings of the family. Jaza’s father took a daily waged job in hand embroidery and her mother started taking tuitions at home to meet the daily expenses. This continues to date however Jaza’s uncle, her father younger brother still has to support the family from time to time.   Jaza’s father only has a High School education and wants so much more for his daughter, he himself is struggling to get a better paid job as it means he would need to retrain which he simply cannot afford. His earning varies between INR 14,000.00-16,000.00 (GB£ 158.75 – GB£ 181.50) per month, depending upon the work assigned. Both Jaza’ father and mother understand the importance of education and contacted Tauheedul Muslimeen Trust (Maulana Kalbe Sadiq) for support. Though they were impressed with all records of the Jaza, the request was turned down stating the reason that they support only Class VI onwards and also not the full fees but a fixed amount. Even if they had accepted the request, the grant was not enough to meet the need of the school fees. The family has put their daughter in City Montessori School, which is one of the top 5 schools in the city. The admission is purely merit based and is a bit costlier than the rest. Not only our brother’s daughter secured her admission in the school, but being on the top position in her class amongst the best student and securing nearly 94% marks speak for themselves about her academic excellence and seriousness towards studies but also reflects on her family’s seriousness about the education. No parents in the world would like to discontinue the education of their child, especially one who is top in their class. With your help the LFCT can assist this outstanding students from a hardworking family to complete her Primary school education in one of the best schools in the city. Please think about sponsoring Jaza and lets watch her potential grow even more. One extra year of schooling increases an individual’s earnings by up to 10% – let us give Jaza three (Global Partnership for Education, 2016). Thank you.
1st
Jan
1970

LFCT hopes to help another family to educate their children, bringing about a brighter future and hand out of poverty


July 2016     Fizz, aged 8, her sister Aliza, aged 7 and their brother Abbas aged 5 have all been partly supported by the LFCT for their school fees in 2015 – 16. They have scored academically very well and continue to score A’s and A+’s across the board. They are appealing for your help for them to continue their studies for another year in grades one, three and six.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Hasan Jafar Father 36 Unemployed Right now hand to mouth and in critical condition
Rizwana Jafar Mother 29 Housewife No
Fizza Jafar Daughter & Applicant 8 Student of class VI No
Aliza Jafar Daughter & Applicant 7 Student of Class III No
Abbas Jafar Son & Applicant 5 Student of Class I No
  The children are studying at New St. Johns College and the total cost will be 61036 Rs./ £696 for the years fees. Their father, Hasan Jafar is unemployed. He suffers from multiple health problems including long term conditions that mean not only is he unwell but his children are also suffering as their parents risk being unable to pay for basic ammenities which emans even school fees and uniforms may be considered a luxury.   Education is a human right and it is powerful:
  • If all girls had secondary education, child marriage would drop by 64%
  • One additional school year can increase a woman’s earnings by 10% to 20%
  • If all students in low-income countries left school with basic reading skills, 171 million people could be lifted out of poverty. This is equal to a 12% cut in global poverty
  (Global Partnership for Education, 2016)   Please assist the LFCT to support Fizza, Aliza and Abbas through another year of schooling and help them to support their family long into the future as educated and responsible citizens.   Thank you LFCT supporters for your continued support providing hope and a helping hand.
1st
Jan
1970

One man hopes to help 22 individuals live their lives with happiness and dignity again – let us give him a helping hand


July 2016 Mr Bassam Banat promises to monitor the project; provide audited annual accounts and annual profit summaries which he will return back to LFCT. 3 4 5 In the year 1948, Palestinians were uprooted from twenty cities and about four hundred villages; about seven hundred thousand Palestinians i.e. 66% of the residents of Palestine became homeless; this represented the complete deterioration of the Palestinian society with all its components and bases; it lead to the emergence of a new phenomenon in the Palestinian society which is the Palestinian Refugee Camps in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and neighbouring countries: Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon and the rest of the world. One of these camps is Arroub Refugee Camp. These camps which bear witness to the catastrophe, homelessness and uprooting of Palestinians from their lands and homeland, symbolize their daily sufferings on all levels: cultural, social, economic, and political. They still exist up until this present moment are waiting for a political decision to put an end to their pain and suffering. We bring you the stories and appeals of several camp residents all related and from one large family, 22 individuals in total, each with their own challenges and ways in which we, the LFCT are appealing for assistance. Urgent Appeal for Aged Brother Ahmed Ibrahim Banat Our brother Ahmed is an aged man who has suffered Epilepsy and Psychological Disorders since birth. Since the passing of his parents twenty years ago, he is living alone in unhealthy small room, in very bad condition. He receives official UNRWA (United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East) assistance and they have classified him a hardship case in the camp. Brother Ahmed is suffering a lot in his daily life, he is very poor, and although he gets some assistance, cannot afford to cover his daily medicine to avoid any body shaking from his Epilepsy, struggles also to cover his daily food, and requires regular use of incontinence pads since he suffers involuntary urination and with it, a loss of dignity.   Urgent Appeal for the family of Brother Khaled Yousef Banat The family of our brother Khaled consists of five persons, living in Arroub Refugee Camp in very bad conditions in an unhealthy two cramped rooms. The father “Khaled” is suffering from mental weakness, he is 50 years old, and unable to do anything, he is suffering from psychological disorder and social isolation bought on by the terrible events he has witnessed in the occupation and living as a Refugee. Khaled’s wife and the mother of three suffers from high blood pressure and diabetes. This very poor family needs your support to cover the medicine for the father and clothes and food for the children and mother members in order to have a simple life with these bare necessities which at the moment they simply cannot afford.   Urgent Appeal for the family of Brother Majed Yousef Banat Our brother Majed is 44 years old, he has a family of six members, living on the UNRWA support as a hardship case in Arroub Refugee Camp. The assistance is very limited. The father has a mental weakness of depression and frustration which he has suffered since 1982 after he has was imprisoned in the Israeli prison. Four of the family members are children and the mother can’t leave the house since she has to take care of the father and her children. Recently she sold her only simple jewellery to cover the daily needs of her family. This very poor family needs your generous support to cover the medicine for the father, and clothes and food for the whole family.   Urgent Appeal for Father Yousef Banat and his son Ibrahim Banat Father Yousef is 84 years old, living with his son Ibrahim 55 years old at Arroub Refugee Camp in very bad conditions in an UNRWA small room. The father is nearly immobile and suffers from leg stiffness and pain alongside high blood pressure. He needs daily medicine and regular injections in his legs to keep him moving. The son Ibrahim suffers from Epilepsy and also requires regular medicine. They require our urgent help to provide basic medicines, food and clothing. Urgent Appeal for the family of Brother Daoud Yousef Banat Our brother Daoud is 36-year-old, and has a large family of seven persons, living in Arroub Refugee Camp in miserable conditions. The father is unemployed and he has no work permission due to the Israeli military orders as a previous Palestinian prisoner. The family is waiting for a new-born; this is a worrying time. Living in very bad conditions, their children is very thin due to the lack of the daily food. The UNRWA offers them urgent food assistance twice a year. Our brother Daoud has a strong faith in Allah and asks for your urgent support to have a small shop in order to cover the medicine, food, papers and clothes for his brothers and cousin’s families, since he is the only person who taking care of them. Brother Daoud can take care of all of the families given as little assistance to set up a small shop. Daoud is mentally sounds and fit but through his unemployment struggles to feel he can be any use. Brother Daoud believes with some assistance to set up, he can become fully self-sustaining and can pay for the medicines and food and adequate nutrition of his large family all profiled here and totalling 22 individual members.   Brother Daoud has found a moderate place to open the shop with a size of 50m2, the shop lies in a very good place in which there isn’t any other shop. He plans to rent it and to do the required rehabilitations in it as preparation for a shop as follows:  
No. Type Number Price in Euro Total Price in Euro
1. Rent for five months 5        100.00                 500.00
2. Goods Shelves 30          60.00              1,800.00
3. Palestinian Refrigerator 1      1,200.00              1,200.00
4. Palestinian Coffee Grinders 1      1,100.00              1,100.00
5. Chair 1        100.00                 100.00
6. Table 1        150.00                 150.00
7. Aluminium Door 1      1,000.00              1,000.00
8. Aluminium Windows 3        200.00                 600.00
9. Tile ground (Blat)        800.00                 800.00
10. Bricks and concrete        500.00                 500.00
11. Electricity        400.00                 400.00
12. Transportations        200.00                 200.00
13. Different Goods for the Shop    10,000.00             10,000.00
Total Euro 18,350.00
  The total micro finance needed is Euro 18,350 (for each family this will be Euro 3,670). The project will cover all the daily food, medicine and other basic needs for the five families’ profiles and the project will be managed by Brother Daoud who is taking care of the five families all the time. Besides, the project will be controlled and observed by Professor B Banat, who is a volunteer in LFCT in West Bank, Palestine, “Wa Allahu Khair Al-Shahediyin” “Allah Best Witnesses”. Mr Bassam Banat promises to monitor the project and provide audited annual accounts and annual profit summaries which he will return back to LFCT.   LFCT donors, please give generously to this noble project and help Brother Daoud in his mission to support over 22 individuals in great need. With a little input from the LFCT five families will be able to thrive again, living their lives with dignity and happiness. They do not ask for much but a simple life, let us help them in their journey and offer them a helping hand.   Thank you.   Signed by: Mr Bassam Bannat, Al-Quds University, Abu Dies, Jerusalem
1st
Jan
1970

Let us work together and help Syed complete another year of schooling


July 2016 Syed Nazar Raza is 15 years old. He is one of over 40% of teenage boys in India that might not be able to finish education to a secondary level. Family data:
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Syed Shamsher Raza Father 48     Private Job 12,000.00
Mahjabeen Mother 45 Housewife Nil
Shefali Raza Sister 23 Student Nil
Syed Nazar Raza Applicant 15 Student Nil
  Syed is in grade 11 and recently scored 75% in his 10th grade examinations. He is at the All Saints Senior Secondary School and is appealing to the LFCT for just INR 34,600.00 / GB£392.00 to fund another year of his schooling. He was supported by the LFCT last year and has done very well so far, scoring 7.4 CGPA in CBSE board, which is a prevalent Board in India.   Syed has two years are remaining to complete his schooling. In India 12th Board exams are the final classes for secondary schools, after which depending on the academic performance in subject performance and most importantly the performance in ‘All India Open competition’, Syed will decide on the course he hopes to be admitted to as an undergraduate.   Syed has a poor family, whose income they would need to save in its entirety for three whole months before paying the school fees for this year. Together we can help Syed finish another year of schooling. Did you know that one extra year of schooling increases an individual’s earnings by up to 10%? (Global Partnership for Education, 2016). Syed will be able to better contribute to his society and community and is much more likely to be healthier and happier, and of course he will pass all of that onto his immediate family – just through educating one person.   Thank you LFCT donors for taking the time to read about Syed and his story, lets help Syed get the best start in life and finish another year of secondary education.
1st
Jan
1970

Helping Asiya become an engineer and role model – you can be a part of her success today


July 2016 3 Asiya comes from a large family where she has five siblings, all of which, including her, are students, apart from her eldest sister who has recently started working in Bangalore as a trainee in TCS as an engineer. Bangalore is an expensive city and Asiya’s sister cannot afford to send much financial support back for the rest of the family. Daily living is a struggle for the family and they are raised single handed by their mother after their father sadly and unexpectedly passed away several years ago. Family data:
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Baby Naaz mother 45 housemaker  
Hina Sayed sister 24 ASE-trainee 3.3LPA
Sara Sayed sister 22 student  
Mohd Abbas brother 20 Student  
Aun Abbas brother 14 Student  
Kumail Sayed sister 12 student  
Asiya Sayed applicant 17 Student  
  Asiya has done very well in her academic study so far and has scored 80.5% pass rate in her last examination of the 10th class. She came 489th/600 in her year making her one of the top students. Asiya has a further two years of education before she is due to graduate. Like her sister, she too is keen on an engineering career and hoped to perform well in the All India Entrance Test and score well in her next exams. Asiya dreams of continuing her education and finishing school but she knows the family need all the support they can get to pay for their daily living. Soon her older brother and sister will graduate and hope to get good jobs and feed into the family but for now Asiya risks having to give up her education to support the family in this time of difficulty – she has two younger siblings that she would love to see finish their high school. Asiya is appealing to the LFCT to help cover her school fees so that her family don’t have to worry about putting what little income they have by to cover them. The fees for the academic year 2016 – 17 at ISC Board school are INR 79,900.00/ GB£907 and Asiya is appealing directly to all LFCT supporters for assistance with her fees this year. Please give generously to this project and help Asiya take up a career in engineering and support her younger siblings to have the same chances in education that she has had. Thank you.
1st
Jan
1970

Words can’t describe my gratitude, thank you for stopping our hunger pains this Ramadan ~ LFCT provides Ramadan iftar food relief for 400 families facing famine in Ethiopia


July 2016 3 4 5 Introduction Organization for Help Out (OHO) is a non for profit, non-political, and non-Government organization which, is re registered according to the Charity and Societies Proclamation No 621/2010 with Charity and Societies and Agency (CSA) as an Ethiopian Resident Charity on January 8/2010 with the Certificate No 1377.   Background Ethiopia with the total population of more than 85 million out of which about 45-50%% are followers of Islam. With annual average per capita income of US$180 in 2005/7 Ethiopia is one of the poorest countries in the world.  The poverty in Ethiopia is a result of multiple factors of economic, social, environmental, technological, political and institutional nature that collectively impacts on poor livelihoods and exposed for experiencing hunger.   Agriculture and pastoralism are the main livelihoods of the 85 per cent of population experiencing poor productivity as a result of erratic rain fall and recurrent drought. More than 90% of households in the rural area of this targeted programme of Ramadan iftar aid are dependent on agricultures, and livestock and less than 10% practice small scale irrigated crop production, or are employed and involved in other non-pastoral activities to complement their agricultures and livestock production.   There has been a high level of poverty among the targeted pastoralists and agro pastoralists’ people characterised by low levels of literacy, poor health, nutrition, education and depressing environmental and sanitation conditions and the recurrent and present severe drought leading them not only to lose their livestock, but also their crops at large. The most pressing issue that affects the livelihoods of the target communities is food security through access to land and water for both grazing and agriculture. However as a result of shrinkage of natural resources, land alienation and recurrent drought destitute households grow in number. These households are the most food insecure and the target of relief hand-out.   Programme purpose                                            The purpose of The Lady Fatemah (as) Charitable Trust 2016 Ramadan Ifatr Food Aid Programme in Ethiopia:  
  • To address the Ramadan iftar feeding shortage of 300 Muslim households or 1,800 individuals including elderly, widows, orphans and poorest during the month of Ramadan through providing the required food items to be purchased from the local market.
  • To provide poorest rural muslim communities with the opportunity to seek greater spiritual enlightenment and reflect upon the struggles of those less fortunate.
  The major activities implemented among others were:– – 400 poor households identified and registered in collaboration of community elders. – Ramadan iftar food distribution observers’ special committee established. – Food items purchasing committee established. – 200 bags of wheat flour, each 100 kg, and 1,402 litres of cooking oil bought. – All food items transported and stored to each site. – Distribution of iftar meals to all identified victims conducted in collaboration with community elders and religious leaders.   Community Participation The proposed The Lady Fatimah (as) Charitable Trust Ramadan 2016 project of Ethiopia was implemented in collaboration with the village leaders, local government and Imam/ Ulama and religious leaders and community members. Accordingly the food items were purchased through open bids and involved peoples appointed by the community. Their role including checking the food stuff to ensure it met quality standard.   The good image of this project is that the beneficiaries of this project directly participated in its inception, planning, and were involved in the project delivery too.   Program impact The amount of food items distributed is will cover the consumption of one household for the period of whole month of Ramadan. Hence it’s believed that this intervention helped the beneficiary household to retain or save their asset that would have been sold to cover the household food items needed for the holy Month of Ramadan. Output: 20,000kg of wheat flour, and 1,402 litters of edible oil supplied 400 household (2,400) family members benefited each, HH 50kg of wheat flour, and 2 litters of cooking oil.   Financial summary  
No Type of food items unit Unit cost/ Item Total cost per item Fund contributed by LFCT
1 Wheat flour 100kg £38.42 £7,684.00 £7,684.00
2 Edible oil 1Littre £1.76 £1,408.00 £1,408.00
3  A. Sub Total £9,092 £9,092.00
Description units Unit cost Total cost
1 Transporting food items 4 freight 147.67 £590.68 £590.68
2 Sub Total ££590.68 £590.68
Total  A+B £10,273.36
A Project Admin
B Communication Phone, fax £24.00 £24.00
C Fuel diesel £180.00 £180.00
D Miscellaneous cost £155.00 £155.00
E Total  Contributed by OHO £359.00 £359.00 £359.00
F Grand total Project £9,914.36
  Exchange rate 1GBP= Eth.Birr 31.23   Beneficiary Comments “Words can’t describe how to express my gratitude to the The Lady Fatemah (as) Charitable Trust for reaching us at the time of this famine when we have been in extreme hunger, may Allah bless your sole, ameen” Kadra Jibril, aged 48   “Our hut is empty of what is enough for Ramadan, but you make it full of meal in this holiest month of Ramadan. Our stomach Will witness in that accourt day, Jazakumullah keyran enough“  Shek Mohammed Qamar   May Allah(swt) bless this organization  for helping us ,Allah (swt) knows everything.“ Shukriya Jeylan widow   “Even if we kept quiet for this incredible aid, Allah (swt) will bless you definitely, you gave us our Ramadan meal, you will back having the duas of all this victims, Insha Allah Hoping you come back again.” Haji Amen Abdulla Clan elder
1st
Jan
1970

Bringing water to their doorsteps – new water schemes in Pakistan to reduce the perilous journey for one of life’s basic necessities


July 2016 3 4 5 “Pakistan is facing an acute water shortage and may run dry by 2025, according to a latest study. Experts say the water scarcity is also stoking violent conflicts in the country, which is already battling insurgency,” (DW, 2016)  “The geography of Pakistan varies greatly, ranging from arid deserts to remote mountainous regions. This makes accessing safe water extremely difficult for the poorest people. 16 million people in Pakistan don’t have access to safe water,” (WaterAid, 2016) These statements are the reality for millions of poor households across Pakistan. LFCT and their local partner will build a further ten water schemes this August reducing water insecurity for over 800 people. They need your help to achieve this. The communities to be served are remote and isolated, often on steep hillsides in arid surroundings. Often the localities can only be reached by foot or on horseback and this is often the route for fetching water – a job that is left predominantly to the women in the communities. Each scheme will differ depending on its needs, geography and size of settlement and where villagers can afford it, they will provide the workforce and contribute to raw materials. The scheme are due to be completed in August and they will bring relief and health. Women will no longer have to make perilous journeys down steep mountain sides to fetch water and can instead use the time on income generation and preparing for their future Pakistan faces a great shortage of drinkable water. This is a far cry to how Pakistan was in the past. Just a few decades ago it was a water rich country, however, a recent World Bank Report labels Pakistan as one among 17 other countries that currently face a water shortage. It is pertinent to mention here that the major source of drinking water in Pakistan is groundwater, so water availability is the second most serious issue. Groundwater is the most common source of drinking water in Pakistan. Levels of groundwater are falling which lead to insecurity water scarcity and insecurity, particularly for rural communities. Hand pumps provide up to 70% of water supplies in rural areas. LFCT donors please give generously towards this project and lets lift one more community out of water scarcity at a time  
No. Details of scheme proposed Cost COST
1 Hand Pump to be installed in Havelian Village. The residents are facing an acute water shortage. The villagers themselves will make the bore and bear its expenses and then they will be provided with all other necessary equipment to complete the pump. There are 30 houses in this locality with population of 150 people. PKR 50,000.00 £363.10
2 Chhari Jindakka locality is situated at a higher altitude from the water spring closest to the residents. The villagers will install their own water tank at the source and then will be provided with a pump and pipe to get the water to the houses. This locality comprises of 20 houses with a population of 110 people. PKR 45,800.00 £332.60
3 Phhagwari locality in the Village of Kangran Maira is located at a higher ground from the water spring nearest to the Village. Residents need a high powered pump to pump water to their locality. The locality comprises of 15 houses with population of 90 people. PKR 55,000.00 £399.41
4 The residents of Karhakki Village are facing an acute water problem in this locality. At present, the women have to get water from spring at a distance of half a Km. The Villagers will get the bore made and bear its expenses and then they will be provided with all other necessary equipment to complete the pump. There are 12 houses in this locality with population of 72 people. PKR 45,000.00 £326.79
5 A hand pump will be installed in Ghambir Village. At present, the residents have to fetch water by hand and carry on their heads from half Km away. They will get the bore made and bear its expenses and then they will be provided with all other necessary equipment to complete the pump. There are 15 houses in this locality with population of 90 people. PKR 50,000.00 £363.10
6 A water supply scheme will be installed in Kohistani locality in Lora Mohalla. Here 35 families live who get water from a spring about one Km away. There is a water source above this locality with plenty of water. It is 4500 feet away. The residents will bury the pipe and bring it to their locality. Water will flow through gravity. No pumping or use of electricity will be necessary to help this population of 200 people. PKR 50,000.00 £363.10
7 In the Thar desert area there are thousands of small localities comprising of 15 to 20 houses. The women from these localities have to travel to distant wells and fetch water by hand, a task which is very laborious. By providing them with a hand pump in their locality this makes fetching water much easier. One scheme to be installed. PKR 60,000.00 £435.72
8 In the Thar desert area there are thousands of small localities comprising of 15 to 20 houses. The women from these localities have to travel to distant wells and fetch water by hand, a task which is very laborious. By providing them with a hand pump in their locality this makes fetching water much easier. Second scheme to be installed. PKR 60,000.00 £435.72
9 In Balgadia Village, 15 families live who get water from a spring about one Km away. There is a water source above this locality with plenty of water. It is 4000 feet away. The residents will bury the pipe and bring it to their locality. Water will flow through gravity. No pumping or use of electricity will be necessary. PKR 45,000.00 £326.79
10 A hand pump will be installed in Nalotha Village. The residents face a problem in getting water from a distant spring. The women have to fetch and then carry water on their head for ¾ Km. To solve this, the villagers will get the bore made and bear its expenses and then they will be provided with all other necessary equipment to complete the pump. There are 13 houses in this locality with population of 70 people. PKR 45,000.00 £326.79
Total Expenditure PKR 505,800.00 £3,673.12
Funds available from previous schemes. PKR 55,800.00 -405.22
Funds required PKR 450,200.00 £3,267.90
9th
Aug
2016

Two new reverse osmosis plants in Korangi, Pakistan


August 2016 7 8 9   Your choices are to drink water contaminated with fecal matter or buy expensive bottled water, something your family really cannot afford. These are your choices if you are a poor family in Korangi, Pakistan. The LFCT aims to install two further reverse osmosis plants to provide safe and free clean drinking water.   ‘Korangi piped water contaminated with fecal matter’, A recent study indicated that as well as fecal matter being present in the supply, that chlorine added to the water to make it safe for human consumption was well below recommended levels.   Project Overview: LFCT’s local partner in Pakistan is appealing for two new reverse osmosis water plants in Korangi. One is to be installed in Korangi II in Kutchi Abidi slum and the second in Awami Colony. This second plant will be close to the current plant installed last year. This will help to meet the high demand on the plant. The current plant has long queues forming daily as the capacity it functions at, 10,000Lwater/day is far too low. One more plant is greatly needed at this location. A queuing system is now in place but the only viable option is to increase the availability.   The locations where the plants are to be installed have population of 8 – 10,000 people, the young, and the elderly. The current source of water for these families are from piped water supplies – one we have learnt is contaminated with fecal matter and a source of diarrhea, vomiting, typhoid and hepatitis. If they do not collect water from this contaminated source they must buy expensive bottled water which is not a reality for many and a burden on their income.   With the installation of the new plants the water will be supplied free of cost and will never be sold. There will be minimal wastage and each individual will get an amount, relative to their family size. There will no longer be queues beyond capacity at the existing plant and families can fetch water free of cost and be assured of health and dignity.   Why reverse osmosis? Reverse Osmosis (RO) is a process in which dissolved inorganic solids (such as salts) are removed from a solution (such as water). This is accomplished by regular water pressure pushing the tap water through a semipermeable membrane. During this process, the contaminants are filtered out and flushed away, leaving clean, delicious drinking water. Reverse osmosis is capable of removing up to 99 percent of up to 65 common different contaminants (see partial list below), including lead, fluoride, chlorine, dissolved salts, and more.   There are generally four stages in the reverse osmosis process: Sediment Filter: This pre-filter stage is designed to strain out sediment, silt, and dirt and is especially important as the sediment filter protects dirt from getting to the delicate RO membranes that can be damaged by sediment. Carbon Filter: The carbon filter is designed to remove chlorine and other contaminants that affect the performance and life of the RO membrane as well as improve the taste and odour of your water. Reverse Osmosis Membrane: The semipermeable RO membrane in your RO system is designed to allow water through, but filter out almost all additional contaminants. Polishing Filter: In a four-stage RO System, a final post filter (carbon filter) will “polish” off the water to remove any remaining taste and odour in the water. This final filter ensures you’ll have outstanding drinking water.   Budget: The total for the two plants is 350,000PKR / £2,565.00
1st
Jan
1970

Lunch for all at Ali Model English School It costs less than £2 per head to feed a child.


August 2016 1 2 3   Ali Model School is located in Korangi, a slum area of Karachi where family earning is far below the poverty line with only one breadwinner per family of 8 – 10 people. The Ali Model School opened their nursery section in August, with 36 students. During the lunch break only a few children could bring their own lunches, the others had to simply sit and watch. The school could bear this no longer and begun to provide lunch to the entire nursery cohort.   With the help of donors, the school started providing lunch to 36 students of the nursery. The menu was designed with the help of a nutritionist and a lady was hired to prepare the lunch. The students were very excited to have a balanced and nutritionally rich lunch and quell their hunger throughout the day, leaving them to enjoy their education.   The school identified another gap, this time with the students of primary age (up to class 2). Most of these came to school with inadequate lunches, their parents barely able to afford to provide them with food throughout the day. The Trust appealed to the donors of The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust to support them in the noble act of providing funds for lunches for the entire primary cohort on a monthly basis. Several new staff members were hired to create a support group for preparing the lunches for more than 200 students. The school is now appealing for further assistance to help the new intake of 50 students this new academic year.   Project overview: At the start of the new school year 2016-17 the Ali Model English School tried to freeze admission of new students due to limited seats in the school. However, the reputation of the school means parents cannot accept no for an answer and given that there are no other school in the area that offer a quality education, still parents bring their children to the school. The school’s model of offering a holistic approach is proving to be very popular.  One of the schools activities are providing lunch for its students.   The LFCT has been assisting the Ali Model School to provide lunch for its students for the past year. The project receives a lot of good feedback and according to the parents the project is having the following impact on their children:
  • Reduction in water borne diseases,
  • Saved from eating unhealthy and unhygienic food items,
  • Parents save the money which they were spending for school break time.
  At the school we have seen the following impact: We have noticed that lunch facility to students is impacting on students and parents alike. Following observations found during survey:-  
  • Punctuality: Students’ punctuality and attendance is increased knowing they will get a nutritious lunch.
  • Pride in their environment: Children want to replicate the hygienic and clean environment the lunches are prepared and served in within their own homes and are encouraging their parents to learn from the school.
  Due to the increase in students there are more mouths to provide with lunch. There are now 50 new children in the school.  
Class Nos. of Students Nos. of Students Increased
2015-16 2016-17
Nursery Moved to KG-I 37 37
KG-I 32 36 4
KG-II 35 37 2
1st 41 44 3
2nd 44 45 1
3rd 38 40 2
4th            37 38 1
Total Increase 50
  Cost of lunch: The items for the lunches are procured locally and the cost depends on the market rate. The school always endeavors to provide nutritionally balanced, healthy and the best quality (within available budget) lunch to students. With the Government’s latest announcement of the 2016-17 budget, the cost of various basic foodstuffs have increase including chicken and bread. The cost per head for lunch at the school has gone up accordingly by 18%.  
NO Particulars Unit Unit Price (Prev) Unit Price (New) Difference % Increase
1 Chicken Kg PKR 270.00 PKR 320.00 PKR 50.00 18.52%
2 Bread Pkt PKR 25.00 PKR 28.00 PKR 3.00 12.00%
3 Eggs Dozen PKR 96.00 PKR 108.00 PKR 12.00 12.50%
4 Butter Pkt PKR 215.00 PKR 250.00 PKR 35.00 16.28%
5 Noodles Pkt PKR 21.00 PKR 24.00 PKR 3.00 14.29%
6 Biscuits Pkt PKR 110.00 PKR 135.00 PKR 25.00 22.73%
7 Banana Dozen PKR 55.00 PKR 70.00 PKR 15.00 27.27%
8 Apple Kg PKR 60.00 PKR 85.00 PKR 25.00 41.67%
  LFCT donors, please help the Trust to provide ALL children at the school with a nutritious lunch each day. It costs less than £2 per head to feed a child.
24th
Aug
2016

Situation report: A snapshot from Iraq


  August 2016 The LFCT has collated some of the latest news information and analysis of the situation in Iraq. It is not designed to be a compressive report but gives an up to date snapshot of some of the challenges faced by the women and children the LFCT supports across the country. August 2016 ——- As if the ongoing turmoil was not enough, this month, researchers identified that exposure to toxic materials from explosion of munitions and burning of military waste by US army as cause of birth defects and cancers. Human exposure to heavy metals and neurotoxicants from the explosion of bombs, bullets, and other ammunition affects not only those directly targeted by bombardments but also troops and people living near military bases, according to research published in the scientific journal Environmental Monitoring and Assessment   The study is important, because there has been scant research on how years of warfare across the Middle East have impacted local civilian populations, and data is hard to collect.   In 2010, rates of babies being born with birth defects were as high as 30%. The full scale of the pollution from years of war in the region may never be known. (Guardian, 2016)   On the second anniversary of Islamic State’s attack on Sinjar, aid agencies say thousands of people are still being forced from their homes in northern Iraq.   Aid agencies are warning that northern Iraq is in dire need of support due to a renewed offensive in the area, a funding slowdown and the threat of more attacks on the region’s cities, which are likely to result in hundreds of thousands more people being displaced. The UN said camps for displaced people are at full capacity, and without additional funding, the 1.5 million people expected to be caught up in renewed fighting around Mosul could be without aid. Across Iraq, more than 3 million people have been displaced because of conflict and 10 million need humanitarian assistance. Since March, 40,000 people have been displaced from Mosul and the surrounding area. August 2016 marks the second anniversary of Islamic State’s attack on Sinjar, which caused the displacement of an estimated 300,000 Yazidis, a persecuted ethnic minority who live in northern Iraq and Syria.   “Many women tell us their families are starving, they have no way to earn money, they are not safe, and they are struggling each day with the debilitating effects of extreme trauma. We are trying to help them address both their immediate and long-term needs.”  “Two years on and the humanitarian situation in Iraq continues to deteriorate at an alarming rate. Today, for the 3.3 million Iraqis who have been forced to flee their homes, hope is fading fast of a return home or of being able to lead a normal life where they now are.” “It is estimated that more than a million people still live in Mosul and any large offensive against the city could result in the displacement of up to 600,000 more people,” she said. (Guardian, 2016) ——- The Global Terrorism Index ranks Iraq as the country in the world most affected by terrorist activity, followed by Afghanistan, Nigeria and Syria.   We’ve taken figures over a single 8 month period (according to the UN): – 18,802 civilians killed – 36,245 injured – 3.2 million displaced – including one million school aged children – 3,500 sex slaves   A United Nations report said at least 900 Iraqis were killed and 1,500 wounded in May alone, when Baghdad was the worst-affected district.   Establishing Extremist Ideas in Children’s Minds through Education, Exerting Influence and Psychological Changes   When children constantly watch and witness violent actions, violence involuntarily becomes part of their behaviour. There is no doubt that the constant sound of explosions, bombings, executions and shooting has caused many of Mosul’s children to be permanently frightened and worried. Many of them are unable to separate from their parents, even if only for a short time.   In May 2016, psychologists monitored 50 children from Mosul during play in the street. It transpired that 43 of these children played violent games using pieces of wood as knives and weapons and imitated members of ISIS who engaged in killings and slaughter.   According to statistics published by the United Nations, 800 to 900 children were abducted by ISIS in Mosul in 2015 alone with the aim of subjecting them to military and “religious” training. ISIS also forcibly recruits children into its military force. The exact number of children serving in the ISIS military force is unknown, but it is obvious that in every new set of statistical information, the number of children belonging to ISIS is higher than in the previous one. ISIS gains access to these children through schools, sports clubs and orphanages and through sending its agents into the midst of groups of children in public places and in the streets.
25th
Aug
2016

UPDATE AND APPEAL: Orphans and widows fled to Babylon now drinking dirty water. With your help the LFCT can change this.


August 2016 6 93 99 The LFCT has already assisted 19 families that fled from Mosul where seven men across the families were brutally attacked and murdered by so called ISIS. Over half of the families are now made up of just widows and their orphans. They fled and were assisted to AlHashid AlSahaabi, the popular mobilisation who protected them and sent them to Babylon to safety. They have been given land provided to them by the land owner plus a simple building, however they still lack enough safe water drinking, toilets and bathrooms. This is having a damaging effect on their health and wellbeing and is something we can easily fix, with your help.   Key beneficiary data:
  1. The number of the HHs is 19.
  2. The number of individuals is 96.
  3. There are 7 widows among them all of their husbands had been killed by ISIS.
  LFCT Donors, The total cost of this appeal is The cost of TWO water tank plus the tabs, transportation and fixing it is IQD 2,500,000.00 = GB£ 1,590.00 The cost of ONE double toilets plus transportation and fixing the pipes is IQD 800.000 = GB£ 508.00, they need TWO with cost IQD 1.600.000 = GB£ 1,016.00 The Total is IQD 4,100,000.00 = GB£ 2,606.00 The source of the information is their representative (Karema Hadi_Um Hussain) Another NGO in Babil is providing them with two water tanks (1000 litres) and the water directorate has provided them with water once a week. However, this is far too little for 96 persons to live off and remain healthy. To put this into perspective, the WHO states that the absolute minimum is 7.5 litres a day per person, this doubles to 15 litres per person in an emergency situation. Their current supplies means 1000 litres would last barely over a day for these 96 individuals. They are having to manage their water consumption, limit bathing and washing and think about every sip they take. The families have blocked the road in protest asking the Government officials for more water and their representative has met with the following officials; Water Directorate, Municipality representative and Displacement Committee representative. In this meeting it was agreed that the Government could not provide a piped scheme but they agreed to provide more safe drinking water for the families. After many attempts by the Government of laying a pipe from the water source it was realised the water source is itself insufficient – it regularly dries up or stops flowing. Right now, the best solution for these families is establishing a water tank which the water directorate will fill. This will ensure enough clean water on a weekly basis.   Working together with the LFCT it was agreed: –       LFCT to supply two water tanks with capacity 8000 litres. –       Water directorate to fill the tanks weekly –       Water directorate to issue an official letter (Addressing to water providing department / copy to LFCT) with information of the obligation to fill the tanks weekly.   The cost for these tanks and installation equipment will be 1.250.000 IQD/GB£ 1071.67: –       2 Water tank, the capacity of each 8000L. –       2 Iron bases with 30cm height. –       2 sinks with four taps.   This will bring much needed relief for the families who are forced to fetch water from a dirty pond and ratio out the safe drinking water they receive presently. This is the greatest, immediate need, closely followed by the related need for toilets and bathing facilities.   At present the families are sharing just two bathrooms and toilets and are in desperate need of more facilities. A lack of facilities means a lack of personal hygiene, which, along with the lack of drinking water is having a negative effect on the widows and children’s health and wellbeing.   Each joint toilet (toilet and bathing area) costs 800,000 IQD/GB£ 685.00 A description follows below:  
1 The dimensions of the toilet and the joint bath are 1*2M.
2 The ground floor is made from Jagger plate.
3 Out frame of the toilet is 5MM iron covered with sandwich panel.
4 Water tank capacity 500L.
5 Latrine seat and the sewage network including the pipes.
6 BVC out door
7 Exhaust fan for the toilet and one electrical lamp.
LFCT supporters, please give generously to this appeal for safe water and toilets. It is no fault of their own that these widows and innocent children find themselves in such awful circumstance. They have faced an awful trauma that no one should ever have to face, let alone a child.   Please help the LFCT and local partner to provide them with the basic human right of clean water and sanitation. These are vital basic necessities to help the families move on and recover.   Thank you.   Signed by; Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, Project Manager, LFCT Karbala
7th
Sep
2016

EDUCATION SUPPORT PROGRAM – Shining the light for a better tomorrow


September 2016

“The Only Way to Help Yourself is to Help Others”

Dear LFCT Donors: Please donate generously for these two needy sisters “Ignorance is dangerous but knowledge without responsibility is more dangerous”  WR1 WR2
Name Raheela Abbas, Iqra Abbas
Father name Nazim Abbas
School Government College for Women, Chakwal
Class Higher secondary school certificate – FSc, Part-1 (Pre-medical)
  Education a soul – empower an entire community Education is the only solution for the humanity to prosper, with the aim to help every needy student to get education, MICT has taken lead amoung all its competitors by providing education scholarships to the destitute. Madinatul Ilm charitable trust (MICT) through the kind support of Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust (LFCT) is seeking to raise funds for two sisters Raheela Abbas and Iqra Abbas who are attending the Higher secondary school certificate FSc part-1 from government college for women, Chakwal, in Pakistan’s Punjab province.   Family Background & Financial Condition:- Raheela Abbas and Iqra Abbas are the twin sisters and belong to a low income family from Jamal Waal village of District Chakwal in Pakistan’s Punjab province. Nazim Abbas, father of these sisters is a camera man with a monthly income of PKR 15,000.00 approximately. Nazim Abbas is altogether responsible for supporting seven children including Raheela Abbas and Iqra Abbas, making it highly difficult for him to afford daughter’s education at Government College, Chakwal. Because of this family’s financial challenges these sisters faces the risk of discontinuing their education. Faced with deep financial distress, Raheela Abbas and Iqra Abbas need your financial support. As before, MICT with the backing of Lady Fatemah (AS) Charitable Trust-UK will regularly monitor the academic progress of this student and provide regular updates.   Family Details of Nazim Abbas:  
Name Age (Years) Status Occupation
Nazim Abbas 43 Father Camera Man
Khalida Parveen 40 Mother House Wife
Raheela Abbas 16 Applicant Student
Iqra Abbas 16 Applicant Student
Umm e Farwa 14 Sister Student
Qonain Fatima 6 Sister Student
Aoun Abbas 3 Brother Dependent
M Zain Abbas 04 Months Brother Dependent
  Financial Cost:- The following table shows the detail cost of these two sisters – Including Transportation charges.  
Tuition fee of 2 sisters per annum PKR 14,600.00
Transportation charges for 12 months @ 4000/p.m PKR 48,000.00
Total Cost for these two students – per annum PKR 62,600.00
US Dollars $601.00
GB Pounds £452.00
EURO € 539.00
  Raheela Abbas and Iqra Abbas approached MICT for sponsorship. Your timely support will enable these students to become a useful member of the community.   MICT will provide an update about the progress of these children and monitors the case. Thank You!
8th
Sep
2016

Let us bring a little relief to a family facing difficult times in Iraq – restoring their health, happiness and dignity.


September 2016 33This month’s orphan story is a little different to usual. It shows that each family is individual and many have multiple complex issues that means they struggle to cover even life’s most basic necessities. Zainab is 19 years old and when she reached this age, her parents had imagined her beginning University and studying a subject she was passionate about. Unfortunately, Zainab was diagnosed with Hepatomegaly – enlargement of the liver in early childhood. This means she has spent years away from school, too ill to study. Far from University, Zainab is 19 and in the fifth grade of Primary school. She is the youngest of three siblings, all male. The family are struggling, not only because of Zainab’s poor health but because they were left orphaned by their father when he passed away due to kidney disease twelve years ago when Zainab and her brothers were young children. They were left under the sole care of their mother, who herself has a brain clot and has a small family due to premature deaths. This mean she has had very little support after her husband passed away. The family now is living with their uncle in his house, and struggle to cover their daily living costs let alone cope with their medical complications. Along with Zainab and her mother, Zainab’s brother Haider is married but has recently been diagnosed with cancer and her other brother, Karar also has Hepatomegaly, the same disease as Zainab. Every two weeks Zainab and her brother require treatment costing IQD 100.000 each time. Family Data:  
Name Age Gender Occupation
Zainab Mohamed Abid Albaqi 19 years Female Fifth class Primary school
Haider Mohamed  Abid Albaqi 34 years Male Married
Ali  Mohamed Abid Albaqi 21 years Male Painter
Karar   Mohamed  Abid Albaqi 29 years Male Not working
  Zainab and her family have no funding to pay for this. Their mothers’ illness means she cannot work and her hands are becoming weaker each day. She has recently visited the micro finance project to see if she can be involved despite her condition.   The LFCT are supporting Zainab and her family and encouraging Zainab to stay in school and study. She is already behind enough. Access to an education is ones human right. Please help to support more families like Zainab’s that are facing difficult times. They need our help. Let us help them cover their basic necessities and vital medicines so that they can begin to become self-sufficient and thrive.   In a country like Iraq there are very few safety net to fall back on as the country is still caught in prolonged turmoil. Under the LFCT’s flagship orphan support programme you can help turn a life around by first giving people that initial hand up. Just £30 per month could support someone like Zainab.   Thank you.   Signed by : Ms Saly Naser and Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar
26th
Sep
2016

A further ten water schemes for Pakistan September – November 2016. Can you help us bring clean, safe water to 900 people?


September 2016 Dedicated to Bibi Sakina daughter of Imam Hussein a.s. 26th Sept 2 3   Groundwater is the most common source of drinking water in Pakistan. Levels of groundwater are falling which lead to insecurity water scarcity and insecurity, particularly for rural communities. Hand pumps provide up to 70% of water supplies in rural areas. With a further 10 schemes proposed, LFCT aims to bring clean water to a further 900 individuals. The communities served are remote and isolated, often on steep hillsides in arid surroundings. Often the localities can only be reached by foot or on horseback and this is often the route for fetching water – a job that is left predominantly to the women in the communities. By bringing water to their doorsteps, these schemes will save women time and hard work that takes away from income generation or education. It costs the equivalent of around just £3.50 to provide clean water to one person. That is the same as a daily coffee or cup of tea from any high street coffee shop – could you give up your daily morning coffee and make one at home instead? Per week, that could bring clean water to up to 7 individuals – or 28 in a month. This simple act of kindness could bring health, happiness and dignity to remote communities in rural Pakistan. Thank you.
Phase 15. Proposed water supply schemes for LFCT 
Dedicated to Bibi Sakina daughter of Imam Hussein a.s.. Sept – November 2016
No. Project  Cost in PKR  Cost in GBP
1 Hand Pump at Phhalwali Village, near Havelian. At present, the residents have to travel on hilly track for more than half a km to fetch water. The villagers will fund the bore themselves and the LFCT will provide them with all other necessary equipment to complete the pump. There are about 30 houses in this locality with population of 150 people. PKR 45,000.00 £324.50
2 Phhagwari locality is in the Village of Kangran Maira. It is located at a higher ground from the water spring in the Village. The LFCT will assist in providing a pump system to bring water to the locality. The locality comprises of 15 houses with population of about 90 people. PKR 45,000.00 £324.50
3 A hand pump will be installed in Nalotha Village. The residents face the problem of getting water from a distant spring. The women have to cary water on their heads for about ¾ km several times a day. The villagers will fund the bore themselves and the LFCT will provide them with all other necessary equipment to complete the pump. There are 13 houses in this locality with population of 70 people. PKR 50,000.00 £360.55
4 In the Thar desert area there are thousands of small localities comprising of 15 to 20 houses. The women here have to travel to wells which can be up to a km away. They then have to draw water by pulling a rope and carrying it back by hand. This is very laborious. By providing them a hand pump in their locality, this will ease the physically difficult task of fetching water. PKR 60,000.00 £432.70
5 In the Thar desert area there are thousands of small localities comprising of 15 to 20 houses. The women here have to travel to wells which can be up to a km away. They then have to draw water by pulling a rope and carrying it back by hand. This is very laborious. By providing them a hand pump in their locality, this will ease the physically difficult task of fetching water. PKR 60,000.00 £432.70
6 A water supply scheme will be installed in Marora village in Daccan Paisar District. This locality will be provided with a pipe and water will flow through gravity, reaching their locality. Presently they have to get water from a spring that is half a km away on steep mountain track. The locality comprises of 15 houses comprising of 70 people. PKR 45,000.00 £324.50
7 A water supply scheme will be installed in Gangairu Wala Village in Daccan Paisar District. This locality comprises of 12 houses with 60 people. At present they are getting water from a spring that is about ¾ km away on hilly track. They will be provided with an electric pump and pipe to bring water to their locality. PKR 55,000.00 £396.60
8 A water supply scheme will be installed at Barseenan Wali locality near Khuian. This locality comprises predominantly of poor manual labourers. At present they fetch water from a spring that is half a km away on a hilly track. They will be provided with a pump and pipe which will bring water to their locality. The locality comprises of 20 houses, home to 100 people. PKR 40,000.00 £288.45
9 A hand pump will be installed in Ghambir Village. At present, the residents have no choice but to carry water on heads from half a km away. They will have a bore made and bear all its expenses itself. Thereafter, the LFCT will provide them with all other necessary equipment to complete the pump. There are 15 houses in this locality with population of 90 people. PKR 45,000.00 £324.50
10 A water supply scheme will be installed at Satral near Rahi Village. At this locality there are 18 houses comprising of 80 people. The women living here fetch water on their heads from a spring which is ¾ km away from the Village. The new scheme will mean that water will be pumped to their houses with the help of a pump and pipe. PKR 45,000.00 £324.50
Steel plates PKR 4,000.00 £28.85
Total estimated expenditure PKR 494,000.00 £3,562.35
Saving from previous schemes -PKR 53,916.00 -£388.80
Total Estimated Cost of 10 Water schemes PKR 440,084.00 £3,173.55
1st
Jan
1970

“If God provides food to insects living atop rocks in the desert; he will most certainly not leave us” Ibrahim Asaad from his Hospital bed


September 2016   4 5 6 Ibrahim Assad’s story and project update on LFCT’s support for children and adults living with a disability in South Lebanon. Since the burst of civil war in 1975 and Lebanon is in a continuous state of conflict. The number of people with disabilities has drastically increased due to two major factors: 1) the Lebanese civil war 1975-1990 that resulted in thousands of dead and disabled, and 2) the conflicts with Israel that led to thousands of injured and disabled either during the repetitive military hostilities or even during ceasefires by the unexploded ordinance that had been planted by the Israeli Army. Project Partners: Empowerment Association for Independent Living (EAIL) is a secular, not-for-profit, grass roots organisation that aims to empower people with disabilities in the south of Lebanon and enable them to take charge of their lives and achieve independency. EAIL was established in 1987. Since then it has provided more than 275,000 physiotherapy, occupational and speech therapy sessions to thousands of people with disabilities and injuries in addition to giving out over 8,000 assistive devices and prosthesis. EAIL already has two fully equipped therapy centers in Nabatieh and in Bint Jbeil. Besides the two centers, EAIL has an equipped school in Nabatieh that provides special education and therapies to children with disabilities. There are around 400 children with disabilities between the age of 3 and 16 the Province of Nabatieh split across the following categories; Project Summary: Together with the LFT, we are providing 94 children with sufficient therapy and rehabilitation services at two fully equipped EAIL centres so that children with disabilities are enabled to move, function and regain an inclusive lives. The project has been implemented since 2007. Within this, LFCT project aims simply to support the health of needy children of South Lebanon whether it is through continuous and long term rehabilitation programs or through medical operations to enable these children have their basic rights of adequate healthcare and inclusive lives within their societies. The project is entitled “Educational Assistance for the Youth of South Lebanon’. Its main components are: 1.    Economical Support through Micro-Finance projects. 2.    Medical Assistance, providing disabled with rehabilitation and assistive devices in addition to covering the costs of crucial operations. 3.    Educational Support, Other than University Scholarships, LFCT support Elementary Schools and Kindergarten in Basic Educational tools. 4.    Ramadan Food Baskets. This project is being implemented with the following objectives: •    Ensure Access for disabled and needy children of South Lebanon to rehabilitation sessions. •    Cover part of the cost of treatment for 94 children in Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy and Physiotherapy. •    Support needy children and their families with the cost of medical procedures including operations when needed on a case-to-case appeal basis. •    Support financially incapable families of South Lebanon with health needs. •    Support disabled children in south Lebanon to be included. •    Complement the medical support with educational, and economical support where needed (micro-finance) •    Continuously monitor the progress of supported children toward their goals, and assist them where needed. Although the project predominantly works with children, it also supports their families, parents and carers who may also have a disability. Below we share the case of Ibrahim Assad and how this LFCT project has assisted him and his family. Ibrahim Assad’s story: Ibrahim Assaad, 52 years old, is a butane gas worker and father of two, Khalil, 10 years old and Hassan 7 years old both students in their village Choukine in South Lebanon. Khalil was born with a congenital defect in his foot, called Clubfoot, which is usually detected during labour and treated upon birth. Clubfoot or ‘Congenital Talipes Equinovarus’ affects Ibrahim also and involved only his right foot. Clubfoot occurs at a rate of 1 per 1,000 and is graded as mild, moderate or severe and involves the inversion of the subtalar joint, adduction at the talonvicular joint, and equinus at ankle joint, where the foot is turned to the side and it may even appear that the top of the foot is where the bottom should be. The causes of this deformity are still unknown with a suggestive implication of genetics. Usually, the involved foot, calf, and leg are smaller and shorter than the contralateral side. The treatment of this deformity is usually within two weeks of birth and it is either treated non-surgically or surgically. According the American Association for Orthpaedic Surgeons, ‘the non-surgical treatment should begin as soon as possible to ensure the best results for a successful prognosis without and avoid surgical intervention. In the last decade more success has been achieved in correcting clubfeet without the need for surgery, using a stretching and casting technique know as the Ponseti method. With this method, the doctor changes the cast every week for several weeks, always stretching the foot toward the correct position. The heel cord is then released followed by one more cast for three weeks. Once the foot has been corrected, the infant must wear a brace such as Knee Ankle Foot Orthoses (KAFO) or Custom Foot Orthoses (CFO)_at night for two years to maintain the correction. This method requires family education and involvement in the treatment to ensure proper and continuous bracing. Without the parents’ participation, the clubfoot will almost certainly recur. That’s because the muscles around the foot can pull it back into the abnormal position.’ The surgical treatment may be needed to adjust the tendons, ligaments and joints in the foot/ankle. Usually in the fourth trimester after birth, surgery corrects all of clubfoot deformities at the same time. Post-operatively, a cast holds the clubfoot still while it heals. It’s still possible for the muscles in a foot to try to return to the clubfoot position, and special shoes or braces will likely be used for up to a year or more after surgery. Surgery wills likely result in a stiffer foot than nonsurgical treatment, particularly as the years pass by. Without any treatment, clubfoot will result in severe functional disability, which is exactly what happened to Ibrahim Assaad, where due to negligence and impoverishment he grew up untreated to have a severe deformity in one of his feet. Despite his disability, Ibrahim moved forward he started his own family and worked hard to provide them with their daily living needs. He has worked to provide especially for his two kids, to put them in school and to cover all the incurred expenses that come along the way. Sometimes he has needed the assistance of the community but remained positive, believing that, “if god provides food to insects living atop rocks in the desert; he will most certainly not leave us”. Current Situation Ibrahim used to work in fixing butane ovens for a living relying heavily on his left leg due to the deformity in his right one. Unfortunately, in 2008, Ibrahim fractured his left foot in a work related accident, and hence, being originally unable to use his right foot he remained supine in his bed for 32 weeks after undergoing several surgeries in his left foot. This accident had severe consequences on Ibrahim’s family who were already barely able to make a living. Unable to work, the family had no income and as a self-employed professional he lacked the benefit of health insurance – a much needed asset at the time. His mother in law helped the family by paying most of his medical treatment as well as some of their living expenses. The community also stepped in a little bit as well covering some of the family’s living expenses. The family problems did not stop there, as a result of extended immobility, his left foot muscles atrophied and Ibrahim had to undergo an extensive program of physiotherapy to rehabilitate his muscle strength. In order to be able to work again and earn an income to support his family, Ibrahim needed to have his right clubfoot deformity corrected surgically and the only means to stabilise his foot after the surgery was to use a KAFO which cost 2,000 USD alone. This was not covered by the ministry of health, which would only cover part of his hospitalisation fees. Already being supported by his elderly in-laws and the local community, Ibrahim had no one to turn to and ask for help especially that the amounts required are quite substantial vis a vis his local community. Project Impact Soon after implementing a project in Ibrahim’s own village, the LFCT volunteers mapping the village came across the Assaad’s devastating situation. As one of LFCT volunteers put it “it could be in our hands to help Ibrahim reach out and get him some help, but it is in god’s hands to erase the suffering from his eyes especially when he looks at his two boys”. LFCT did not hesitate in supporting Ibrahim Assaad, where not only the remaining cost of his surgery, hospitalization and brace were covered by LFCT, but additionally his whole physiotherapy treatment has also covered. Costs covered by LFCT:
Heading  Total Cost LFCT Support
Surgeries $ 800.00 $ 800.00
Medications TBA $0
Hospitalization $ 1,535.00 $ 250.00
Medical Assistive Devices $ 2,000.00 $ 2000.00
Rehabilitation TBA As Needed
To date, LFCT has supported Ibrahim with 3,050 USD a help that has changed a long suffering of 52 years, but has also supported the future of Khalil and Hassan. Once again their dad is be able to work and provide them with their daily needs and secure their future. Ibrahim’s wife is also able to live a normal life once again, caring for her kids and being supported by her husband rather than having to care for the whole family by herself. The case of Ibrahim Assad is typical of the sort of projects the LFCT implements with the Empowerment Association for Independent Living (EAIL). By assisting with vital surgery, physiotherapy and rehabilitation, children and adults living with a disability are once again able to take control back of their lives.
1st
Jan
1970

LFCT supports vital lifesaving surgery for little Rida Zahra


September 2016 Aged just 17 months old, Rida Zahra faces an uncertain future but the chance of surgery could change that 7 8 Rida Zahra is 17 month old. She lives in Pakistan with her family. The family have one breadwinner, the father, Muhammad Danish, who brings home PKR 12,000 per month. This is around £88. He works hard as a Computer Operator in a local private company whilst Rida Zahra’s mother looks after her daughter in the family home. The family struggle on this low income and have had an additional stress on their finances since their first and only child was born. Rida Zahra is suffering from a congenital heart disease and has been diagnosed with partial AVSD common atrium and gd II AV resurge. Rida Zahra has suffered this since she was born. Recently, a cardiologist recommended comprehensive heart surgery to help Rida Zahra live as normal life as possible. For her family, this is causing a great dilemma – the impoverished family simply cannot afford the cost of such a procedure. Family data:  
No Name Status Age Occupation
1 Muhammad Danish Father 29 Years Computer Operator
2 Anam Sahar Mother 24 Years Housewife
3 Rida Zahra Patient 17 Months
  Having this surgical procedure is a matter of life or death for little Rida Zahra. Without this surgery Rida Zahra will live a difficult and short life. The amount is comparatively low – but for the family it is over three years of salary for Rida   Zahra’s father. Essentially, Rida Zahra has a hole in her heart which means her heart cannot function properly and needs to work harder. The heart risks leaking blood between the atriums. This can ultimately lead to heart failure. By performing open heart surgery, the hole is repaired and the heart can continue to function normally. Rida Zahra will always need regular check-ups but without this surgery her condition will only worsen. The family have sought contributions from their family and community to the cost PKR 200,000 but they are still searching for the shortfall. The family has approached The Lady Fatemah (AS) Charitable Trust (LFCT) and MICT, LFCT’s local partner in Pakistan, to seek PKR 250,000.00 for meeting the cost of this lifesaving surgical procedure. Cost of treatment:
Estimated Cost for Heart Surgery with lab charges and Medicine PKR 450,000.00
Contribution from Family PKR 200,000.00
Total Requested Cost for Surgery PKR 250,000.00
Total Cost In US Dollars                          2,392.00
In GB Pounds                          1,843.00
In EURO                          2,148.00
  The LFCT will be supporting Rida Zahra’s family with the financial assistance needed for this vital operation. We will share regular reports and updates of her progress with LFCT supporters and wish her all the best in a speedy recovery.
1st
Jan
1970

Water Projects in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, West Bank, Palestine, Gaza, Palestine, Pemba Island, Ethiopia and Malawi (338 Water Wells in the Name of Bibi Sakina a.s.)


September 2016 (338 Water Wells in the Name of Bibi Sakina a.s.) 9 10 11 Water Well Project (The first act to be rewarded on the day of Judgment is the charity of water. Imam Baqir (A) “Thawab al A’mal”) COMMENTS by a lady: Village resident, female, aged 20 “I saw my mother and other women in the village fetching water from the well every day on their heads. The distance was half a Km, so every pitcher meant one Km to travel. I always despised it and could not imagine doing so for many many years to come. I asked my mother to marry me to a locality where this donkey work is not done. She scolded me saying that your few classes of education has spoiled you and that I am lazy. Thank you brothers and sisters for your help. Allah will certainly reward you for looking after fellow human. You are great and your thoughts for helping humanity are great.”    Village resident, male, aged 65 “Due to scarcity of water we had to leave our homes after 3 / 4 years when shortage of water compelled us to do so. But due to these pumps provided by our benevolent brothers and sisters from far off places, there is less likelihood of a long drought, meaning we hope to stay in the village. We thank you and pray that Allah look after their needs in this life and reward you in Hareafter befittingly.”   Water Well projects carried out in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Gaza, West Bank, Ethiopia, Pemba Island, Tanzania and Malawi as at 26 September 2016   Bire Sakina   338 –  Water supply scheme at Kohistani mohalla Lora. Here 35 families live who get water from a spring which about one Km away. There is water source above this locality will plenty of water. It is 4500 feet higher on the rocky hill. We burried the pipe and bring it to their locality.  Neither pump nor electricity is required  as water is flowing through the force of gravity.  Population of this village is  about 200 people. PKR 38,500.00 – GB£ 276.25   337 – In Thar desert area there are thousands of small localities comprising of 15 to 20 houses. Their women have to travel to distant well and rope out water from well which is very laborious. By providing them a hand pump in their locality eases out life for them. It is near to houses and drawing water is also easy.  This saves daily journey of half to one kilometres daily carrying water on their head. PKR 60,500.00 GB£ 424.15   336 – Bajwala Shah Moqsood Village. Here people made the bore and they were provided with hand pump. This locality comprises of 20 houses with 85 people living there. Before this they had to get water from a distant water pit. This now saves daily journey of women. PKR 24,200.00 GB£ 173.65   335 – Thathi Karam Shah Village. People made the bore; LFCT provided them with casing pipe, motor and water pipe for the bore. This locality comprises of 18 houses with 80 people living there. Before this they had to get water from a distant water spring. GB£ 26,400.00 – GB£ 189.45   334 – Lanjian Mohall Mistrian, Village. Here again the people made the bore and LFCT provided them with casing pipe, motor and water pipe for the bore. This locality comprises of 20 houses with 90 people living there. Before this they had to get water from a distant water pit. PKR 16,654.00 – GB£ 119.50   333 – Darra Seer Sharqi, Village. At this locality water was brought to the locality with the help of electric pump and pipes to a Hand pump that was far away. The Hand pump was locally made and LFCT provided them with other material required for the project. There are 18 houses and comprises of about 80 people. PKR 24,530.00 PKR 173.05   332 – Ghori, Nurpur, Village. This locality had a water pump but that was located below the village. Still women had to get the water on their heads from the pump. They were provided with pump and pipes that brought water to their Village. The Village comprises of 15 houses with 70 people living there. PKR 32,450.00 GB£ 232.85   331 – Larran Narhotar, Village. In this village water was pumped up to the locality whose population is dispersed. The water is now available at a central place and they can get it from here. Previously they used to get from ¾ Km away. Now they have it at distance of few hundred meters. In future they will make water tank here and from there pipes will be layed to 3 localities that are located here. In so doing they will not have to walk few hundred meters.Total no of houses are 35 with population of 200 people. PKR 23,650.00 GB£ 169.70   330 – Upri Bari Nurpur, Village. In this locality the water source was far below the village. The villagers made the bore and they were provided with pump and pipe to pump the water to the locality. This place has about 15 houses with 90 people living there. PKR 29,050.00 – GB£ 280.20   329 – Upri Pandi Nurpur. This is another locality of the same village Nur Pur. There are 20 house with a population of 110 people. They made the bore and they were given pump and pipe to pump the water to the locality. Here again women had to walk 800 meters to get water each day. PKR 34,650.00 GB£ 248.65   328 – Sohna Khaitar – Rupar, Village. In this locality water spring was on one side of the stream and the locality was on other side of stream. They were provided withpump and pipe to pump water to the locality above the stream. There are 15 houses with a population of 80 people. PKR 24,200.00 – GB£ 173.65   327 – Balgadaia In Balgadia village 15 families live who get water from a spring about one Km away. There is water source above this locality wilh plenty of water. It is 4000 feet away through short distance. These people burried the pipe and brought water to their locality. Water will flow through gravity. No pumping or use of electricity is required. There are about 70 people living in this locality. PKR 49,500.00 GB£ 355.20   326 – Upper Nalla – Dakhan Paisar. This locality is situated far away from the water spring. They were given 4500 feet pipe only. They were asked to bear the cost of the pump. There are 15 houses in this locality with 85 people living there. The women had to walk about 1200 meter for each pitcher of the water for their families.  This project has saved their daily 1200 meter journey carrying load on water on their head PKR 52,800.00 GB£ 378.90   325 – Hail Khuian Village now has a new water supply scheme. Here they had hand pump provided by Government but it was at a distance meaning it was a half a KM to fetch water each time. We provided them with motor and pipe to get the water to their houses. The locality comprises of 11 houses with a population of 55 people. PKR 21,450.00 GB£ 156.09   324 – Kharpari Khuian Village now has a water supply scheme. Here they had hand pump provided by Government which was located at a distance meaning they still had to walk ¾ Km to fetch water. We provided them with a motor and pipe to get the water to their houses. This Village comprises of 10 houses with a population of 42 people. PKR 18,150.00 GB£ 132.07   323 – A water supply scheme is now in place at Meetar Nurpur Village. Here they had hand pump provided by Government but it was still at an unreasonable distance for most houses. Still they had to walk half a Km to get water. We provided them with a motor and pipe to get the water to the houses. This Village comprises of 8 houses with a population of 45 people. PKR 18,150.00 GB£ 132.07   322 – A water supply to Masjid Mohalla Kangran Maira locality is now up and running. This scheme feeds 18 houses on the steep, rocky hillside. The place comprises of 90 people and t was predominantly the women used to carry water in heavy vessels on their head for a distance of up to 1Km daily. They were provided with an electric pump and pipe. As in all schemes we asked them to bury the HDPP pipe in the ground. If buried one foot deep it will have life of 50 years. If left in open then it will have life of only 5 years. PKR 39,050.00 GB£ 284.16   321 – A water supply scheme is now finished in Kutlian Syedan Rahi. Here also water was pumped to the houses with the help of electric pump and pipe. PKR 23,650.00 GB£ 172.10   320 – A water supply scheme has been installed at Kangar Lora. This locality is at higher ground from the water pit below where women had to carry water on head for approximately ¾Kms every day. They have now been provided with water at their doorstep with the help of electric pump and pipe. The locality comprises of 12 houses with 70 inhabitants. PKR 47,300.00 GB£ 344.109   319 – A water supply scheme has been installed at Chanali-Malach Village. Chanali is a large village and Malach is one locality within the Village. The scheme enables water to be pumped up to the houses. Before this villagers used to walk about half a Km to fetch water. This locality comprises of 20 houses with a population of 140 people. The villagers were thankful to LFCT for bringing water to their village, easing their daily journey for one of life’s basic necessities. PKR 32,450.00 GB£ 236.12   318 – A water supply scheme has been installed at Kotli Village. This is a large village and inhabitants were all fetching water from a distant place they had to trek to each day on foot. Now water has reached to their houses with the help of pipes and electric motor. This will serve 15 houses comprising of about 110 people. PKR 46,200.00 GB£ 336.19   317– A water supply scheme has been installed at Mohra Maira Village. Here water was pumped to the houses with the help of a pipe and electric pump. The Village is comprised of 11 houses, home to 100 individuals. They were jubilant to have water in their village finally. PKR 24,500.00 GB£ 178.28   316 – The Village of Kals Lora had a water source much below the houses but they had no means to reach it without walking and fetching on foot. With the help of the LFCT, water was pumped to their houses with the assistance of an electric pump. They were provided with a pump and pipe. The locality is inhabited by 12 houses and has population of 70 people. PKR 16,500.00 GB£ 128.07   315 – Thar desert area in Sind province is short of water, so much so that the people migrate when water runs short. They have been provided a water bore from LFCT in a remote village named Mithrio Soomra, in Meghwar Bejal Paro Mohalla. This locality comprises of 13 houses with 45 inhabitants. Water was struck at a depth of 12 feet. People were jubilant seeing water near their houses for the first time. PKR 60,000.00 GB£ 436.61   314 – Sehr Dherian of Rahi Village – inhabitants had to collect water from a water pit located down in the valley. Through this existing scheme the LFCT facilitated the pumping of water to the houses located on the ridge. Locality has 12 houses with 70 inhabitants. No longer will they need to scale into a dangerous valley to fetch water. PKR 19,800.00 GB£ 144.08   313 – Village Name: Bohdoor ji wand; Cast of people living there: Bajeedani Lanka Tehsil/Tahulka: Islam KotUnion Council: Manjthi Union Council: Manjthi District: Tharparkar No of houses: 20. No of people living: 120. Before they were getting water which was hal KM away. The place where Hand Pump will be installed will be made WAQF – PKR 60,000.00 – GB £ 395.35    312 – Village Name: Yaroo Lanjo Maro Cast of people living: lanja Tehsil/Tahulka: Islamkot District: Tharparkar No of houses: 8 No of people living here:70 Before they were getting water which was half KM away.Depth of hand pump = 85 feet The place where Hand Pump will be installed will be made WAQF. PKR 60,000.00 – GB£ 395.35    311 – In scheme named as Bogri– Rahi. Water was pumped with a powerful electric pump and brought to 15 houses comprising of 110 people. PKR 39,600.00 – GBP 260.95    310 – In scheme Massah Sydan — Karun na Bagla.Water was brought from a distant source through gravity flow. The pipe measuring 3500 feet was buried so as to last long. It lasts for 50 years if buried. If remains open then it has life of only 5/6 years.  ​This will feed 18 houses with a population of 95 people. PKR 30,800 – GB£ 202.95    309 – Water supply scheme Landa – Chankot. With this scheme water was pumped from a water hole located at a place much lower than the village. Women used to fetch water from there on their heads. They were supplied with an electric pump and water pipe to get the water to the houses. This will save them from daily labour of getting water from far off distance. PKR 25971.00 GB£ 171.15    308 – . This is also a pumping scheme through which water was pumped from a water source down below from the village to the houses on higher elevation.  The location is Sandwari in Khuaian village. This place has 14 houses with a population of around 80 people. Here also women had to go on slippery track to reach the water pit down below. PKR 48,950.00 – GB£ 322.55    307 – This is place where plate written with ‘’ Ya Mahdi adrakna’’ is placed. The locality name is Thapla in village Chinali. Water was pumped frpm a water pit below the village to the populated locality. This place has about 18 houses comprising of around 110 people. Women folk used to walk the difficult terrain to get water. Great sigh of relief for them. PKR 23,200.00 GB£ 152.90    306 – This place has plate written with ‘’Ya Abbas’’ Location is named as Dakhan in village Chinali in district Abbottabad in KPK.  It has 12 houses comprising of 75 people. Women folk used to walk the difficult terrain to get water. Great sigh of relief for them. Water pumped to village with the help of motor and pipes. PKR 31,450.00 – GBP 207.25    305- Water supply scheme at Bunna lamb in village Lora. Through this scheme water was pumped from a well already available to 15 houses on the hillock above it. The locality is populated with 80 people. PKR 29,800.00 GBP 196.35    304 – Village called naanoni, the bore was made by people themselves and they were provided with casing and pump. This location comprises of 15 houses with about 95 people living there. They had to walk about half a Km to get water earlier. Now they have water at their door step. PKR 29,800.00 – GB£ 196.35    303 – In Titkot khuian the Hand pump was provided by the Governmentt but that was much below the houses where people lived. To pump the water up to the houses they were provided with electric pump and pipes. PKR 31,000.00 – GB£ 204.30    302 – Water & Sanitation Project for Kohsar Town, Barakoh, Islamabad. water supply scheme in Kohsaar town, a small locality with about 30 homes. Together, the population of this locality is about 150-200. PKR PKR 178,535.00 – GB £ 1,308.00    301 – Clean water for mosques, Shamiani Island, Pemba. Shamiani Island is located in the District of Mkoani, Pemba South Region. There are nine villages on the island with a total population of 233 families. The families are all very poor, facing multiple problems and barriers to a comfortable existence. A large percentage of the families live in extreme poverty. TSH 7,118,500.00 – GB£ 2,260.87    300 – Hand pump in Thar desert’s farthest district Islamkot, where people have to travel one to two Kms to get water. Here water is struck at 110 to 150 feet. PKR 66,000.00 – GB£ 438.70    299 – Hand pump in Thar deser’s farthest district Islamkot, where people have to travel one to two Kms to get water. Here water is struck at 110 to 150 feet. PKR 66,000.00 – GB£ 438.70    298 – Water pumping scheme Jalyari Kohala. Here water is available in a water spring, this will be pumped with the help of electric pump to 14 houses on the ridge. It will provide water to about 95 people. Women have to walk on steep path to reach this spring. PKR 40,000.00 – GB£265.85    297 – Water supply scheme Jalyari- Galli Khiala. Through this scheme water will be provided to 6 houses on the mountains.  Water will be pumped to the houses high on the mountain from a water spring down below. It will serve needs of 30 people. PKR 38,000.00 – GB£252.55    296 – Water supply scheme Phalla. Water well is available in this locality about 750 meters from 11 houses comprising of 70people. They have to walk on mountain slippery track daily to get water. This will alleviate sufferings of these people. PKR 45,000.00 – GB£299.10    295 – Water supply scheme Apparlam – Lora.  Here also water is available down below from the village. Water will be pumped to the houses with the help of electric pump. There are 16 houses in this location comprising of about 90 people. PKR 35,000.00 – GB£232.60    294 – Water supply scheme Nakyal- Lora.  This place is adjacent to main town but is not having access to clean water. It comprises of 12 houses with 60 people living there. Here water will be pumped from water point down below the village at a distance of 1500 feet. PKR 40,000.00 – GB£265.85    293 – Water supply scheme Pattan piran.  Water is available here 1200 feet below the village. Women have to walk on hilly track to fetch water daily. The locality comprises of 18 houses with 100 people. Water will be pumped to the village with the help of electric pump and pipe. PKR 40,000.00 – GB£265.85    292 – Water supply scheme Khaitran. This is small village on a hillock. It comprises of 12 houses with 65 people living there. There source of water is a water pit in the valley. This is at a distance of 1500 feet down the slopes. Water will be pumped to them with the help of a motor and pipes. PKR 40,000.00 – GB£265.85    291 – Water supply scheme Pathani. This locality is also situated on a hill ridge. It has about 25 houses comprising of 150 people. Water will be pumped to them from a water bore that is available at a distance of 1800 feet away down below the ridge. PKR 48,000.00 – GB£319.00    290 – Village Name:  Mero; Mohalla:  Sehto Paroo; Cast of people living there:  Lanja & Koli; District: Tharparkar; No of houses:  23; No of people living: 130; Distance of water from mohalla: 1km. PKR 66,000.00 – GB£ 446.95    289 – Village Name:  Niblo; Mohalla: Valio Mohalla; Cast of people living there:  Bheel; District: Tharparkar; No of houses:  25; No of people living:  170 ; Distance of water from mohalla. 1km. PKR 66,000.00 – GB£ 446.95    288 – Village Name: Village Rohi Raaro; Mohalla:  Darya Khan Lanjo;  Cast of people living there: Lanjo; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 36 houses; No of people living: 170; Distance of water from  mohalla: 01km; PKR 66,000.00 GB£ 446.95    287 – Village Name: Nisar Abad: Mohalla:  Idrees Jee Wandh; Cast of people living there: Lanjo; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 15; No of people living: 64; Distance of water from mohalla: 0.5km; PKR 66,000.00 – GB£ 446.95    286 – Hand Pump scheme village Kharian, district Hari Pur. Through this scheme a hand pump was made down below from the village where water was indicated. The water from this bore was then pumped up to 15 houses that were of the ridge.  It serves about 90 people of the locality. PKR 57,200..00 – GB£ 387.35    285 – Water supply scheme dheri Kiala & Tangri, District Abbottabad. There is a water well situated much below the village from which women used to fetch water daily on their heads. With the help of a pump and pipes the water was pumped to two localities on the hillock.  Villagers made two tanks on their own. We supplied them with submersible pump and pipes for distribution to these two localities. This scheme is feeding 40 houses of 300 people in these two localities. PKR 73,974.00 – GB£ 500.95    284 – Water supply scheme Charbat, Teh Havelian. Through this scheme water was pumped from a water well that is much below the village. From that pit women used to get water daily on their heads. It is feeding 30 houses comprising of 150 people. PKR 56,837.00 GB£ 384.90    283 – Water supply scheme Dungian near Lora, district Abbottabad. Through this scheme water was pumped to higher ground where houses are situated. Water was available much below the village. Through this scheme 11 houses were given water. This locality comprises of about 80 people.  PKR 46,100.00 GB£ 312.20    282 – Hand pump in mohalla Pulley in Havelian village. In this locality a school is situated and there are about 15 houses as well with 80 people. The villagers made the bore and we supplied them with all the necessary stores to get water out of 180 feet deep  bore. PKR 55,000.00 – GB£ 372.50    281 – Hand pump in village Panjgran, tehsil havelian. Here also people made the bore and we supplied them with the pump and pipes. This location comprises of 20 houses and population of 120 are being served through this bore. PKR 45,970.00 – GB£ 311.30    280 Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, Oromia National Regional State, Bale Administrative zone, Ginir District, Jaja peasant Association. The Ginir district has a total population of 123,103 divided into 35 rural Kebele 6 semi urban. Ginir town is the district capital Which is located 552 km away from the capital Addis Ababa to south east.    279 Village – Soojavery Dhabo, Pakistan; Villers were drinking Unclean water from well; 10 houses: PKR 66,000.00 – GB£ 438.75    278 Village – Jaro, Pakistan; Villagers were walking daily Quarter km to fetch water: 12 houses; PKR 66,000.00 – GB£ 438.75    277 Village – Mohra Kalanda, Pakistan; Villagers were walking daily Quarter km to fetch water; PKR 35,600.00- GB£ 236.70    276 Village – Seri Kalanda, Pakistan; Villagers were walking daily Quarter km to fetch water; 13 houses; PKR 37,100.00 – GB£ 246.65    275 Village – Disal Rahi, Pakistan; water was pumped from a well that was half a Km down from the village Disal Rahi. Submersible pump was used to pump the water to the houses. HDPP pipe was used and it was buried in ground for more life; 10 houses; PKR 46,100.00 – GB£ 306.50    274 Village – Landa Chankot, Pakistan; located on hill side and people were having problem in getting water from a spring down below. Here a bore was made and luckily water was struck at 80 feet depth. That was a great jubilation for people. This hand pump is at door step and daily carrying of water on steep mountains on the heads of women has stopped: 13 houses: PKR 37,200.00 – GB£ 247.30    273 Village – Gia Saindri, Pakistan: pumped water from a well down below and brought it up to the village where it serves the school children as well as the local population of 10 houses; PKR 55,400.00 – GB£ 368.30    272 Village – Chhoi near main village Kohala, Pakistan; pumped water from a water spring down in the valley to Chhoi Kohala comprising of 15 houses that are on top of a hillock. For the women folks it was a great difficulty to fetch water on heads on the steep mountain track; PKR 73,800.00 – GB£ 490.60    271 Village – Hajia. Pakistan; They had acute water problem; 8 houses: PKR 46,600.00 – GB£ 309.80    270 Village – Hundian near main village Rahi. Pakistan: Water pump was installed to draw water from spring which is 2200 feet below. Villagers had to go up and down the hill to fetch water 15 houses: PKR 38,200.00 – GB£ 253.95   
  1. Water supply scheme Jandi Wali Chankot. This locality comprises of 10 houses. The villagers tried their best and spent about PKR. 200,000.00 to get a bore. But there were TOO large rocks underneath. All of their four efforts failed to get water. LFCT’s partner suggested to them to get water through pumping water from a spring that is about 1000 feet below the mountains. Their women used to go down on these steep hilly track to get water. This scheme proved successful. LFCT provided them with 2 HP pump, water pipe, electric line and stabilizer for electricity to bring Electric voltage to 220 volts. In these far flung areas electric voltage is weak between 125- 150 volts. PKR 80,080.00 GB£ 488.40
  
  1. Hand Pump in Village Name: Bitri; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 20; No of people living: 160; Distance of water from Mohalla. 1km; Project Completed in September 2015 PKR 70,000.00 GB£ 426.92
   267.Hand Pump in Village Name: Onri; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 15; No of people living: 120; Distance of water from Mohalla. Quarter km; Project Completed in September 2015 PKR 70,000.00 GB£ 426.92   
  1. Hand Pump in Village Name: San lanja; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 12; No of people living: 90; Distance of water from Mohalla: Quarter km; Project Completed in September 2015 PKR 70,000.00 GB£ 426.92
  
  1. Hand Pump in Village Name: San Deda; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 18; No of people living: 130; Distance of water from Mohalla. Quarter km PKR 60,000.00 GB£ 365.94
  
  1. Hand Pump in village Larri Syedan, near Havelian, District Abbottrabad. This locality has 20 houses with total population of 120 people. PKR 45,298.00 GB£ 276.27
  
  1. Hand pump in village Phhalwali in Tehsil Havelian. This locality has 15 houses with a total population of 90 people. PKR 41,195.00 GB£ 251.25
  
  1. Hand Pump in village Mohri-changra in district Abbottabad. This locality has 25 houses that will bear the cost of the bore. LFCT will provided them the pipes and pump. PKR 44,759.00 GB£ 272.98
  
  1. Hand Pump in village Seri- Gujrat district Abbottabad. This village comprising of 16 houses having a population of 90 people. PKR 40,040.00 GB£ 244.20
  
  1. Hand Pump in village Sajawal. This village comprising of 22 houses having a population of 120 people. PKR 43,200.00
   256- 257 – 258- 259 Mgoli, Lakolikoje, Jambonia and Mgongeni. Villages on Shamiani Island, South Pemba, Tanzania. 2,025 residents over 233 families including the elderly and young. TNZ 24,521,100.00 GB£ 7,090.00    255Village Name: Sirngho; Mohalla:      Mevani Paro; Cast of people living there: Wasai Pota; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 10; No of people living: 80; The place where Hand Pump has been installed will be made WAQF on stamp paper. PKR 72,000.00   254 – Village Name: Sirngho; Mohalla:      Arbab Paro; Cast of people living there:   Wasai pota; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 15; No of people living: 120 PKR 72,000.00   253 – Village Name: Doonjh; Mohalla: Qaboolani Mohalla; Cast of people living there: Juneja; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 10; No of people living: 80 PKR 72,000.00   252 – Village Name: Samaro; Mohalla: Aziz Paro; Cast of people living there: Lanja; District: Tharparkar; No of houses: 11; No of people living: 90 PKR 72,000.00   251 – Hand Pump in jhangra-Kashka, Havelian in district Abbottabad. The locals shared the cost of the bore rest of the gadgetry was provided to them. This locality has 20 houses with a population of 120 people. PKR 45,000.00   250 – Hand Pump in village Sairi Gujrat. This is farmers’ village having 17 houses with a population of around 90 people. They were bringing water from an open water pit half a Km away. They made the bore and supplied them with the all needed stores. PKR 42,000.00   249 – Village Batangi is located near Abbottabad. Has a population of about 80 people and 22 houses. They used to get water from water spring half a Km away. When that spring used to get dry then they had to go to another spring 0.75 Km away. They made the bore themself and LFCT provided them with H.P stores. PKR 47,300.00   248 – This locality of Nikki Galli is located on the mountain ridge and has 16 houses with a population of 85 people. Used to get water from an open ditch about a 0.75 Km away. That used to get polluted as well. Villagers pitched in with bore cost and were provided with rest of the stores. PKR 41,400.00   247 – Village Dheri Maira is a small village of 15 houses comprising of 80 inhabitants. They were having problem of water that they were getting from a polluted stream down below their houses. They made the bore and we gave them the stores to complete the project. PKR 42,500.00   246 – Mohall Dheri Kial in village Havelian was getting water from s spring located about half a Km away. There are 20 houses with 100 people living there. They made the bore and we provided them store on behalf of LFCT. The project is complete and people are happy to have water near their houses. PKR 44,500.00   245 – Clean, safe water to 432 students at Ali Model English School, 4,000 Awami Colony, Landhi Town, Karachi, Pakistan £2,349.27   242 – 243 – 244 Jambango’me, Jungani and Mtendeni villages seek clean water for health and dignity. The LFCT needs your help to supply clean water for more residents of Pemba Island. GB£ 3,307.00 The three villages, located south on Pemba Island, have a population of 221 families composed of 1,817 residents including the elderly, young people and children. The three villages suffer a severe lack of clean water. GB£ 3,307.00   241 – Jaja Agro Pastoralist Peasant Association Village, Ginner District, Bale Administration Zone, Oromia National Regional State, Ethiopia. Beneficiaries: 450 direct – Male; 175, Female; 275 GB£ 2,665.06   240 – Storage tank for vital rural health clinic in Shumbageni, South Pemba   237 – 238 – 239 Msiakwe, Mahaura and Mialeni of Wambaa, Benefitting 1652 elders, youths and children. Cost GB£ 6,876.70   236 – Village Name: Doonjh; Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 13; Depth of water: 120ft; Hand pump installed and fully operational. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   235 – Village Name: Soojavery; Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 10 + 20 in another Mohalla. Hand pump installed and fully operational. Prior to hand pump installation, villagers collected water from a salty, low lying well. 1.5km away from the dwellings. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   234 – Village Name: Doonjh; Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 20; Hand pump installed and fully operational. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   233 – Village Name: Manjthi Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 15; Hand pump installed and fully operational. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   232 – Village Name: Sirnghwaro; Thar Desert, Pakistan;No of houses: 18; Hand pump installed and fully operational. Prior to hand pump installation water was collected from 1.25kms away over rocky, uneven terrain. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   231 – Village Name: Lonai; Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 20; Hand pump installed and fully operational. There is no other hand pump in the vicinity. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   230 – Village Name: Soojavery; Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 23; Hand pump installed and fully operational. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   229 – Village Name: Sonsan Near Godhio; Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 15; Prior to a hand pump being installed water was collected from over a km away. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   228 – Village Name: Godhio; Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 18; Prior to a hand pump being installed water was collected from over a km away. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   227 – Village Name: Godhio; Thar Desert, Pakistan; No of houses: 18; Prior to a hand pump being installed water was collected from over a km away. PKR 72,000.00 GBP 443.90   226 – Clean and Sufficient Water for Deaf Children and Adults and their Families in the Gaza Strip. Atfaluna is a beautiful and cozy place where deaf children enjoy a quality environment other than the environment that they are living in. ASDC seeks to give the deaf children a healthy, clean, comfortable surroundings to enhance their wellbeing, as most of the children come from poor families and poor environment. – GBP 6,690.00   225 – Doyo and Qaca Agro Pastoralist Peasant Association Villages, Ginner District, Bale Administration Zone, Oromia National Regional State,   Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia with quantity of clean water for drinking and sanitation and hygiene benefits. GBP 2,665.00   224 – Hand pump in village Dabi, Mithi in Thar Desert.  In this part of the desert water is about 70 – 80 feet deep. Ladies had to travel 1.5 Km to get water during summers. It is providing relief to 20 families comprising of 87 people. PKR 48,900.00 – GBP 304.00   223 – Hand Pump in Okarro, Mithi in Thar Desert. It is providing water to 70 people in a very hot climate. PKR 48,900.00 – GBP 304.00   222 – Hand Pump no 2 in village Okaro. This is a big village, therefore, second pump was installed here. It is providing relief to 65 people of the village. PKR 58,000.00 – GBP 360.00   221 – Hand pump in village Takya Shaikhan, in district Abbottabad. It cost more because the bore went up to 195 feet. We had to use steel pipes of 4.5 inch diameter to support the bore. This locality has 16 houses and its ladies had to get water from one Km. PKR 79,596.00 – GBP 495   220 – Hand Pump in village Gadwi Danni, District Mithi in Thar Desert area. This place has 21 houses and is inhibited by 90 people living in huts. The women had to get water from half a Km away on head. PKR 55,500.00 – GBP 345.00   219 – Hand Pump in village Lisari, District Mithi in Thar Desert area. This place has 16 houses and comprises of about 90 people. They were having salt water nearby that they had to drink and give to their animals as well. For fresh water they had to get it by walking one Km each way. PKR 55,500.00 – GBP 345.00   218 – Hand Pump in Mohalla School, Sataura Village. This village comprises of 18 houses. Total population is about 200 people. Bore was made by the villagers. Water was struck much deeper than expected. They used to get water from open, unhygienic spring from half a Km away. PKR 58,743.00 – GBP 365.00   217 – In this village Maira Gujrat there are 12 houses with a population of 80 people. They have dug the bore and they were given all other necessary hand pump to complete the scheme. PKR 44,870.00 – GBP 280.00   216 – In village Sataura locality of Garhi was provided water through a steel rope and pipe from across the river. Since the locality was much above the level of the spring therefore a diesel pump was used to pump the water to the 15 houses on the ridge above the river. The villager paid the rest of the cost. PKR 77,000.00 – GBP 479.00   215 – In village Badala, Mohalla Gujran local people paid for the cost and of the essentials like bore pipe, electric pump. HDPP pipe was provided to them. The water was struck much below the level of houses therefore it was pumped up to houses with electric pump. PKR 47,300.00 – GBP 295.00   214 – Water Pump village Miani. This is a poor village comprising of 15 houses to whom we made offered 6 years back that they should bear half cost and half LFCT will give. Total population is around 115 people. They could not do that. Therefore LFCT paid the total cost of this scheme. PKR 75,620.00 – GBP 470.00   213 – Two water tanks plus refurbishing of what was a very dilapidated evacuation (minor theatre) room in the gynaecological ward of Bagamoyo District Hospital has supremely lifted the morale of the ward staff. After refurbishment, the room became operational in November 2014. Thanks to the LFCT for making all these possible. GBP 7,235.00   212 – Jungani in Mizingani Island District, Pemba Island   211 – Mtende in Mizingani Island District, Pemba Island   210 – Jambang’one in Mizingani Island District, Pemba Island   209 – Clean water to Tumbi Village on PUNGU Island, Pemba Tanzania   208 – Clean water to Ndong’oni, Village on PUNGU Island, Pemba Tanzania   207 – Clean water to Kajificheni Village on PUNGU Island, Pemba Tanzania   206 – Clean water to Darajani Village on PUNGU Island, Pemba Tanzania- Total Cost US$ 4,500.00   205 – Clean water appeal from is a small village in Mziiwani Area, Wete, Pemba. Tanzania GB£ 1,438.70   204 – Satkhira, South West part of Bangladesh provided afe water to approximately 2,000 + people living in a saline and arsenic contaminated GB£ 11,441.85   203 – 469 Students at Girls Secondary School. Arroub Camp, West Bank Al Arroub Secondary School for Girls was built in 2007 funded by Germany, designed by German architects. Before this school was built, girls in secondary educational level had to study in Beit Ummer secondary school, which witnessed numerous dilemmas that the girls were facing, that raised the importance of building a new school for Arroub girls, which consists of three grades, the tenth, the eleventh, and the twelfth.   202 – 602 Students in Arroub Camp, West Bank, Palestine have now Clean, Cool Drinking Water Arroub camp is a Palestinian refugee camp situated in the southern West Bank in Hebron district, 15 km south of Bethlehem. The camp was established in 1949 to offer refuge to Palestinians who were forced to leave their home villages after the establishment of the state of Israel. At present, 1284 families, a total of 9000 people, live on the camp’s 241 dunum ( 0.24 square kilometres) . The average family comprises seven members. Job opportunities are scarce and the main source of income of most families is the food ration UNRWA, the UN agency for Palestinian refugees, distributes to needy families. The camp population is extremely young on average, with 62 percent belonging to the 0 to 24 years age bracket.   201 – Water Filtering System at Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children   200 – Poorian Wala Lower This is second part of the same village. Village is spread over the mountains and has concentration of houses at two places, this is 2nd place. The water bore is made down below at lower level and then water is pumped up to the Villages. Now they will make water tank near the houses and fix LFCT plate on water tank. Due to heavy rains in the area that will take 3 to 4 week. PKR 49,875.00   199 – Poorian Wala Khurd. This village is spread over the mountains and has concentration of houses at two places. The water bore is made down below at lower level and then water is pumped up to the Village. The first portion of the project is complete and now they will make water tank near the houses and fix LFCT plate on water tank. Due to heavy rains in the area that will take 3/ 4 week.  PKR 46,250.00   198 – Hand pump in Banth locality of village Makhnial . The people of this locality bore the cost of the bore and LFCT provided them with the hand pump and pipes. This locality has 15 houses comprising of 70 people. Presently they were getting water on head from a spring one km away. PKR 48,000.00   197 – In a nearby locality of 20 houses in village of Rehana, District Hari Pur, KPK province a hand pump was made with two provisions. For locality that is living near the level of Hand Pump people can get water through pulling the handle of the pump. For the people who are living at a higher altitude, a motor was fitted at the same site to lift the water above to the houses. PKR 59,000.00   196 – In Thar Desert People have to travel many Kms in dry season to get water. Some time they have to migrate to other places in search of water. This is 8th Water well by LFT in Thar Desert Village Bach, Mithi. Total cost born by LFCT as this is a poor locality. PKR 51,900.00   195 – Thar is a vast desert in Pakistan that gets very little rain during the year. In this village Sahrngwari, Mithi, Tharparkar people have to travel many Kms in dry season to get water. Some time they have to migrate to other places in search of water. LFCT installed 7th Water well in Thar Desert in Sindh. Total cost paid by LFCT as people in this area are very poor. PKR 51,000.00   194 – Hand Pump in village Garhi – Kohala. This locality comprises of about 17 houses with about 100 people. They were getting water from one Km away from an open spring. They bore the cost of the drilling and LFCT provided them with the necessary pipes, pump and electric wires etc. The bore is at lower level and water is lifted up with help of a pump. PKR 46,200.00   193 – Hand pump in School Mohalla village Kohala. The people of the locality made the bore and LFCT provided them with the hand pump and pipes. This locality has 12 houses comprising of 80 people. Presently they were getting water on their head from a spring half a km away. PKR 48,800.00   192 – Hand pump in village Kharian- Kariti. The people of the locality gave the cost of the bore and LFCT provided them with the hand pump and pipes. They used to get water from open ditch that is pretty far off. This locality has 20 houses comprising of 120 people. – PKR 49,500.00   191 – Water well in village Sataura. This is a big village have acute water problem. We provided them with the water well of 4 feet diameter, lined with concrete lining. The villagers will get the pipes to village that is about half a Km away. This is first Water Well done by LFT. PKR 158,840.00   190 – TWO 5000 liter water tanks at KITOPE, PEMBA (526 families)   189 – TWO 5000 liter water tanks at MTONDOONI, PEMBA (674 families)   188 – TWO 5000 liter water tanks at JUUMUEMBENI PEMBA (513 Families)   186 – 187 Two Sumersible Water machines; two water Tanks and two Hand Pumps at Karbala Talkatora Meer Khuda Buxh, India  
  1. TWO 5000 liter water tanks at Maungani (622 families, PEMBA Island
 
  1. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Mtemani (631 families, PEMBA Island
 
  1. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Pungu (721 families, PEMBA Island
  182 Water well in Village Samali–Chinjah, District Abbottabad. This is situated on a plateau on top of hill. They are poor people who cannot afford any work themselves. LFCT dug well for them. Hand pump is not feasible there due to rocky terrain. There are 20 houses to be served. PKR 80,000.00   181 Water pumping scheme for village Jandar Bari —Kohala. Locality being very poor LFCT provided them complete hand pump. It will serve12 houses. PKR 75,000.00   180 Mohalla Jilyari, village Kohala. People made water bore and LFCT provided them with hand pump. There are 15 houses that will be served by this scheme. PKR 40,000.00   179 Village Danna Feroze Pur is situated on top of the mountains and people have problem in getting water from far off water spring. Villagers bore water well themselves and LFCT provided them with pipe and pump. There are 30 houses that will be served with this scheme. PKR 45,000.00   178 Village Tial Patt pumping scheme. Villagers will make water tank at source and in village and LFCT provided them with pipe and motor to bring water from a source about 2500 feet away at a lower level from the village. PKR 35,000.00   177 Village Rupar. This is a poor locality. LFCT paid for complete scheme. It serves about 18 houses. PKR 35,000.00   176 Village Daccan-Kiala. This is a gravity flow scheme in which the villager made water tank at the source and in village. LFCT provided them with 2000 feet pipe to connect both the tanks. PKR 70,000.00   175 Mohalla Kamhar – Kohala, ‘’Kamhar’’ means potters who make clay utensils. These are poor people. LFCT paid for the total scheme. There are about 30 houses in that locality. PKR 40,000.00   174 6th Water well in Thar Desert in Sindh by LFT. LFCT paid for the total cost PKR 40,000.00   173 7th Water well in Thar Desert in Sindh by LFT. LFCT paid for the total cost PKR 70,000.00   170 – 171 – 172. One Water Well (Hand Pump) at Basti Malinga, Pakistan; 239 families with 2,710 beneficiaries  
  1. One Water Well (Hand Pump) at Mohalla Eid gah, Pakistan; 106 families with 1,204 beneficiaries
 
  1. One Water Well (Hand Pump) at Dhok buddah, Dhudial, Pakistan; 95 families with 1,038 beneficiaries
 
  1. One Water Well (Hand Pump) at Dhaku Road, Chakwal, Pakistan; 78 families with 674 beneficiaries
 
  1. One Water Well (Hand Pump) at Dhudial, Pakistan; 92 families with 1,019 beneficiaries
 
  1. One Water Well (Hand Pump) at Koonth, Chakwal, Pakistan; 86 families with 786 beneficiaries
 
  1. One Water Well (Hand Pump) at Mengan, Pakistan; 110 families with 1,213 beneficiaries
 
  1. One Water Well (Hand Pump) at Tobah Near Lillah Interchange,; 111 families with 1,415 beneficiaries
 
  1. Hand pump in village Sataura. This is a big village where Govt has spent millions but they still are not having water. Those schemes were dependent on water that was coming from far way. People in the rout will puncture the pipe and get water for themselves and this village will go without water. Other big scheme was to pump water from the river down below. But the lack of electricity and frequent breakdown of motors and pump has deprived them of water. We want to dig an 300 feet deep bore to get water. This bore will reach level of the river bed and water will be available there. If one pump is successful, more will be dug by the people themselves.
 
  1. Water supply scheme Near Ghambir. The bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them with the Pump and pipes.
 
  1. Water supply scheme Khora near Jabri. The bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them with the Pump and pipes.
 
  1. Water supply scheme Badala near Phhalla. The bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them with the Pump and pipes.
 
  1. Water supply scheme Samali. This place is also on the hill mountain and we will have to dig well and brick line it. The locals will not be able to bear the total cost so we will provide them with most of the funds.
 
  1. Water supply scheme Jandar Bari near Kohala. The bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them with the Pump and pipes.
 
  1. Water supply scheme Mandrian near Danna Nooral
This locality is on the rocky mountains where digging cost will be more. Since the local population is poor therefore promised them that 50 % digging cost we will support  
  1. Burani, Kwale, Kenya over 385 families
 
  1. Miamba, Kwale, Kenya over 175 families
 
  1. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Mjini (484 families, PEMBA Island
  2. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Majenzi (456 familes), PEMBA Island
  3. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Mto wa Kae (583 families), PEMBA Island
  4. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Panza, PEMBA Island
  5. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Kigogo, PEMBA Island
 
  1. Chinjah: The bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them help up to Rs. 50,000.
 
  1. Hajia: The bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them help up to Rs. 50,000.
 
  1. Ghambir: The bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them help up to Rs. 50,000.
 
  1. Rupar: Here bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them help up to Rs. 50,000.
 
  1. Kohala: Here the bore will be made by the villagers and we will provide them help up to Rs. 50,000.
 
  1. Chattan wala, This locality is very poor they need total funding for water well of 4 feet dia, to be dug manually. If successful it will be lined with RCC ring and a water hand pump will be installed. Approximate cost will be around Rs. 80,000.
 
  1. Hand Pump Langra Havelian: This bore will meet the needs of 24 households. Total cost of this bore will be around PKR. 105,000. We paid PKR. 50,000 rest of the cost was met by the people themselves. PKR 55,000.00 / US$ 517.93 / GB£ 325.65
 
  1. Water supply scheme Daccan Paisar, district Abbottabad: They fitted pump at water spring and provided them 2200 feet pipe + Pump to pump water to their houses at higher ground. PKR 44,424.00 / US$ 418.34 GB£ 263.03
 
  1. Water supply Scheme Village Khoyan, District Abbottabad: They made the bore and provided the pump. We provided them with 2000 feet pipe to pump the water to their homes. PKR 27,192.00 / US$ 256.07 / GB£ 161.00
 
  1. Water supply scheme village Langra (Jora Maira), District Abbottabad: This bore will meet the needs of 12 households. Total cost of this bore will be around PKR. 120,000. We paid PKR. 50,000 rest of the cost was met by the people themselves. PKR 55,000.00 / US$ 517.93 / GB£ 325.65
 
  1. Village Manthar-2, Tulka Garhi yasin, District Shikar Pur, Sindh: This bore was made in Province of Sindh. The soil is sandy and is over the basin of the river. Bore does not need machinery to make and water is available at 60 feet depth. Bore is made manually. Therefore it is cheap. PKR 11,000.00 / US$ 103.59 / GB£ 65.13
 
  1. Village Manthar-1, Tulka Garhi yasin, District Shikar Pur, Sindh: This bore was made in Province of Sindh. The soil is sandy and is over the basin of the river. Bore does not need machinery to make and water is available at 60 feet depth. Bore is made manually. Therefore it is cheap. PKR 11,000.00 / US$ 103.59 / GB£ 65.13
 
  1. Village Loung Ditho, District Shikar Pur, Sindh: This bore was made in Province of Sindh. The soil is sandy and is over the basin of the river. Bore does not need machinery to make and water is available at 60 feet depth. Bore is made manually. Therefore it is cheap. PKR 11,000.00 / US$ 103.59 / GB£ 65.13
 
  1. Water supply scheme Dhoke Toru-Havelian, District Abbottabad. People of this locality comprising of 10 houses are poor. They paid the cost of the bore and we provided them with the equipment. PKR 44,748.00 / US$ 421.39 / GB£ 264.95
 
  1. Water supply scheme village Larri Syed-an, District Abbotabad. This is poor locality of 10 houses. They got the bore made and we provide them with the Hand Pump. PKR 20,108.00 / US$ 189.36 / GB£ 119.05
 
  1. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Kifenesini, PEMBA Island
 
  1. TWO 5000 litre water tanks at Mjanaza, PEMBA Island
 
  1. THREE Hand Pumps at Basti Malinga, Chak Beli Road, Mohalla Dars Gah will benefit 280 families
 
  1. ONE Hand Pump at Mohalla Eid Gah, Dhudhial will benefit 86 families
  129 THREE Hand Pumps at Hussaini Chowk, Mohalla Chistain, Mohalla Bhattian, Jamal Wal will benefit 310 families  
  1. THREE Hand Pumps at Tobah Near Lillah Interchange will benefit 241 families
 
  1. Kigongoni Village and Mtaju, Kisiwa Panza Pemba Island each have a population of about 300. These villages are 2 ½ to 3 hours away from the main town of Chake Chake, Pemba. To reach them, one has to walk, drive, take a boat, and walk again. Kigongoni has 70 adult males, 95 adult females and the balance comprises of children. Mtaju has 65 adult males, 80 adult females and about 160 children.
 
  1. Sijuweni, Kisiwa Panza Pemba Island which is 2 ½ hours away from Chake Chake, one of Pemba’s main townships. In order to get to Kisiwa Panza, one has to first travel by road for an hour, take 45 minutes boat ride at Chokocho, then walk for another 45 minutes. Kisiwa Panza has an inheritance of 367 people, of which 60 are adult males, 85 adult females and 231 are children.
  125 Name: Village Madyar Tammar near Nara, Tehsil Havelian, District Abbottabad. No of houses: 14; Population: 83; Problem being faced: Their women have to fetch water from 1 Km down the hill spring on steep mountain terrain. Project: Hand pump will be installed. The digging cost will be paid by the villagers. The cost of pipes and hand pump will be paid by the LFT   124 Name: Village Tarkana-kiala, Tehsil Havelian , District Abbottabad. No of houses: 16; Population: 81; Problem being faced: Their women have to fetch water from 1.25 Kms away spring. Project: Hand pump will be installed. The digging cost will be paid by the villagers. The cost of pipes and hand pump will be paid by the LFT   123 Name: Village Narhotar, Tehsil Havelian, District Abbottabad. No of houses: 75; Population: 425; Problem being faced: They were getting water from a spring about 2 Kms away. That spring has dried up. They are laying line to another spring. They are short of pipes. 600 feet of 2 inch dia, 500 feet 1.5 inch dia, 500 feet 1 inch dia and 700 feet ½ inch dia. The cost of these pipes is Rs. 61,300. Project: Hand pump will be installed. The digging cost will be paid by the villagers. The cost of pipes and hand pump will be paid by the LFT   122 Name: Village Nara, Tehsil Havelian, District Abbottabad. No of houses: 20; Population: 123; Problem being faced: There previous hand pump has dried up. They have to travel 1 km for each pitcher of water. Now they will dig their own hand pump at new location. We will provide them with casing, submersible pump and pipe. Project: Hand pump will be installed. The digging cost will be paid by the villagers. The cost of pipes and hand pump will be paid by the LFT   121 Name: Village Fateh Abad, Tehsil Havelian, District Abbottabad. No of houses: 14; Population: 82; Problem being faced: There is acute shortage of water in the village. Women have to get water from nearby stream 1 km away. Project: Hand pump will be installed. The digging cost will be paid by the villagers. The cost of pipes and hand pump will be paid by the LFT   120 Name: Village Banda Said Khan, Tehsil Havelian, District Abbottabad. No of houses: 14; Population: 78; Problem being faced: Due to drying up the nearby spring, they have to get water from 1.5 Km away. Project: Hand pump will be installed. The digging cost will be paid by the villagers. The cost of pipes and hand pump will be paid by the LFT   119 – 458 Students of Primary School for Boys in Arroub Camp, West Bank, Palestine have now Clean, Cool Drinking Water. In May 2012, the Humanitarian Relief Society, a Palestinian NGO working in the West Bank, applied to LFT and its donors for water refrigerators for the camp’s boys’ school. Arroub camp is a refugee camp housing Palestinian refugees who were forced to leave their home villages in 1948. At present, 1284 families live in the camp, a total of 9000 people. Conditions are extremely crowded with only 40 square meters per person. The average family comprises seven members. Job opportunities are scarce and the main income of most families is the food ration UNRWA, the UN agency for Palestinian refugees, distributes to needy families. UNRWA also runs two schools in the camp that provide primary and intermediate education. Due to constant shortage of funds, the schools can offer only the most basic facilities   118 – Water & Sanitation Project for Christian Colony, Islamabad, Pakistan. The residents of Islamabad’s Christian colonel sent repeated requests to Madinatul Ilm charitable trust (MICT), seeking help from Lady Fatemah (AS) Trust to fund a new water supply project. Though there is an existing water supply line to this colony that line had fallen badly in disrepair and practically stopped supplying water. A new project funded by Lady Fatemah (AS) Trust has now been completed through the Bibi Sakina (AS) water project. The residents of the neighborhood collectively came together during a recent visit by MICT’s staff, to thank LFT for its support in such a timely manner.   117 – Water supply scheme in Basti Malanga Wala, a small locality with about 90 homes. Together, the population of this locality is about 800-850.   116 – Water Well and Cement Water Tank in Wajir District, North Kenya   115 – Water and Sanitation Project for Christian Colony. Pakistan   114 – Bibi Sakina Water Project: USWA College Dhudial, District Chakwal. Over 300 Students from impoverished families benefit.   113 – 1,057 Girls of Arroub Camp Girls School, Hebron, West Bank, Palestine now get Clean and Cool water   103 – 112 TEN Hand Pumps installed at Village Dhok Basharat District Dera Ismail Khan  
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Amam Zainol Abedin (as) Masjid. 310 Families
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Amam Mohamed Baqer (as) Masjid. 332 Families
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Hazrat Abalfazl (as) Masjid. 289 Families
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Tofan Alley. 299 Families
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Haji Allah Yar Alley. 301 Families
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Syed Hassan Alley. 309 Families
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Haji Ahmed Alley. 304 Families
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Shah Khorasan Masjid. 316 Families
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Salman Masjid. 344 Families
 
  1. Herat. Nawabad Noqra. Haji Bazaz Street. 360 Families
 
  1. Herat. Nawabad Noqra. Hazrat Hamza Mosque. 290 Families
 
  1. Herat. Nawabad Noqra. Arbad Amini Street. 299 Families
 
  1. Herat. Nawabad Noqra. Hazrat Ali (a.s.) Mosque. 291 Families
 
  1. Herat. Janghan. Haji Ghul Mohamed Street. 311 Families
 
  1. Herat. Janghan. Haji Zaman Street. 350 Families
 
  1. Herat. Janghan. Wali-e-Asr Mosque. 317 Families
 
  1. Herat. Janghan. Haji Hossain Street. 299 Families
 
  1. Ghazni. Nahoor. Wagh. 316 Families
 
  1. Ghazni. Ghazni City, Hyderabad. Hussein Street. 293 Families
 
  1. Ghazni. Ghazni City, Hyderabad. Haji Ibrahim Street. 299 Families
 
  1. Ghazni. Ghazni City, Hyderabad. Hazrat Ali (as) Masjid. 295 Families
 
  1. Ghazni. Ghazni City, Hyderabad. Near Imam Zainal Abidin Masjid. 311 Families
 
  1. Ghazni. Ghazni City, Hyderabad. Near Imam Zaman Masjid. 350 Families.
 
  1. Ghazni. Ghazni City, Hyderabad. Near Sayed Shohada Masjid. 330 Families
 
  1. Ghazni. Ghazni City, Hyderabad. Haji Esa Street. 311 Families
 
  1. Ghazni. Sarab Godol. Khayathah Street, 290 Families
 
  1. Herat. Coray Millie. Haji Hussain Street. 210 Families benefiting
 
  1. Herat. Coray Millie. Opposite Imam Haji. 180 families benefiting
 
  1. Herat. Syedabad. Opposite Makthab Wali. 210 families benefiting.
 
  1. Herat. Syedabad. Opposite Masjid Hussein. 196 families benefiting.
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Village Safar Khalanthar. 150 families benefiting
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Village Safar Khalanthar. 141 families benefiting
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chopan. Village Chahara E Sajadiya. 180 families benefiting
 
  1. Ghazni. Nahoor. Wagh. 204 families benefiting
 
  1. Ghazni. Khalae Amir Ahmad. 178 families benefiting
 
  1. Ghazni. Kharthae Faiz Muhammadi Kharthib. Masjid Muhammad Mustafa Street. 200 families benefiting
 
  1. Herat. Sadat, Street One 395 families benefiting
 
  1. Herat. Sadat, Masjid Ali. 410 families benefiting
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chupan, Masjid Yahya Ibn Zyed 300 families benefiting
 
  1. Balkh. Ali Chupan, Kalanthar Street. 255 families benefiting
 
  1. Ghazni. Schmsul Arifeen High School. 240 families benefiting
 
  1. Ghazni. Masjid Babul Hawaig Qaidee Qalender. 209 families benefiting
  54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60 (SEVEN Hand Pumps)   SEVEN Hand Pumps in Baglah, Syedabad and Bariki, Nahoor, Afghanistan for 1,800 families   Baglah, Syedabad: Baglah is a remote village located in Syedabad a district of Ghazni province. It falls about 60 miles west of Ghazni city, although there are no concreted roads it can be reached by car taking approximately three hours. The village population is between 4,000 – 4,300 families.   Bariki, Nahoor: Bariki is a remote town located in Nahoor a district of Ghazni province. It falls about 50 miles west of Ghazni city, although there are no roads it can be reached by car taking approximately two and half hours. The population of Bariki is approximately 2,800 families.   Total Cost of the Project GB£ 4,200.00  
  1. BIBI SAKINA WATER SUPPLY PROJECT WAHALI (District Chakwal), Pakistan
There is one “Mohallah” (Settlement) in the village consisting of 15 families of Saadat. This Mohallah has only one manually operated well. The wealthy people in the Mohallah have installed electric motors on the well and laid pipeline to their houses for getting consumable water. The Saadat families are comparatively poor and cannot afford that. The female of Saadat family wear veils (full Hijab) when they come out of their homes. These women in Hijab have to walk long distance through streets and bazaars to fetch water on their heads. This is highly degrading. By providing one well/bore for saadat will ease out the problem. These places have been selected based on providing relief to communities suffering from shortage of drinking water and presence of our own community in these areas. However, other communities will also benefit from these projects and will promote good will between them.   Total Cost of the Project GB£ 1,440.00     52 Masjid Aal-e-Imran Water Supply Project   Location:         The village Hasil is located in District Chakwal on the right bank of Sawan River at distance of 80 kilometres from Rawalpindi.   Population:     The village has approximately a total population of 25,000. Both communities enjoy very cordial relations.   Total Cost of the Project GB£ 680.00   Socio-economic conditions: Agriculture based economy. Land holdings are very small. Three to four acres of land is held by the farmers. No irrigation system exists. Depend on seasonal rains for irrigation of lands. In absence of water supply system few families have dug in tube wells Remaining population is dependent on these four to five wells for their daily needs. There is one mosque and Hussaineyah, located side by side which do not have any source of water and are dependent on community in the neighbourhood. Sweet water is available but at depth of 300 feet. There is a need of independent source of water supply to meet the needs of mosque and Hussaineyah. If a tube well is sponsored locals are ready to meet the cost of electricity.   50 and 51 Hand Pump at Baglah, Syedabad, Afghanistan   Baglah, Syedabad: Baglah is a remote village located in Syedabad a district of Ghazni province. It falls about 60 miles west of Ghazni city, although there are no concreted roads it can be reached by car taking approximately three hours.   Total Cost of the Project GB£ 1,200.00   45; 46; 47; 48 and 49 Hand Pumps at Bariki, Nahoor, Afghanistan   Bariki, Nahoor: Bariki is a remote town located in Nahoor a district of Ghazni province. It falls about 50 miles west of Ghazni city, although there are no roads it can be reached by car taking approximately two and half hours. The population of Bariki is approximately 2,800 families.   Total Cost of the Project GB£ 2,400.00   43 & 44. Two Hand Water Pumps: Deibah, Syedabad and Qoreach, Nahoor, Ghazni Province, Afghanistan   The areas to benefit from this project are Nahoor and Syedabad districts both in the Ghazni province. These are areas where we have been approached for assistance by community representatives. In Nahoor there are about six villages that desperately need water and in Syedabad there are two. Most of the families in these areas have to walk about 2 hours to get water in sheep skin for family use. The lack of clean and safe water in these areas has resulted in the children suffering from diarrhoea and other water borne diseases.   Below are the names of the villages, the average number of families and the recommended number of wells per village.  
Name of Village No of Families Recommended No of Wells  (6 inch)
Deibah, Syedabad 285 1
Qoreach, Nahoor 400 1
Total 685 2
  The cost and size of the hand water pumps depend on the size and geography of the area. According to the water engineer’s reports, these wells are guaranteed to last about 20 years and the hand pumps can also last an average of 20 years depending on usage and maintenance. We would expect the communities to maintain and pay for any spare parts in the future and the local community management committees to ensure proper use of the pumps.   Total Cost of the Project GB£ 1,200.00  
  1. 42. Tube Well for Irrigation in 700 families in Qalay Ghulam, Afghanistan
Background of the Area Qalay Ghulam in Nawabad is in the Ghazni province. As with most parts of Afghanistan, the landscape of these areas are mostly mountainous and with very little vegetation. Presently, many families cannot farm due to the ongoing drought and the very few families that are able to farm are those that can afford to install small water well and construct small irrigation canals to their crops. This is not the best method as only very small portion of the farm land can be irrigated resulting in a reduced or poor harvest. Most of the land in these area are family owned and approximately 700 families have 4 yakat* of land to farm. An average family is made up of 14-20 people with brothers living together with their families.   (*1 yakat =43,600 sq.ft)   The crops grown in Afghanistan are:  
·         Wheat ·         Tomato
·         Barley ·         Lettuce
·         Maize ·         Cucumber
·         Chanadal ·         Apple
·         Potato ·         Plum
·         Cauliflower ·         Mulberry
·         Cabbage ·         Peach
·         Aubergines ·         Almonds
·         Grapes ·         Walnut
·         Tobacco ·         Hay
·         Beans
  With the three main crops in this area being: wheat, beans and potato.   The farming season starts in March through to September with all of the family working on the farm. This usually starts with planting the wheat and barley then vegetables and fruits and this sequence is so that the rain fed grains are harvested first as they are irrigated by the melting snow.   Total cost of the Project GB£ 15,710.00  
  1. Village JHAMAT (District Attock):- with over 5000, population has 25% Shia community. There used to be a Government provided water scheme providing water through an 11 km long pipeline. This pipeline is damaged and blocked for last 6 months. It needs digging and repairs the places at faulty spots. The total estimated cost is amount PKR 60,000.00
 
  1. Uswa College Islamabad:- situated in rural Islamabad, Uswa college is a prime institution offering quality education mostly to the students of backward areas of Pakistan. The college has been established and is being run by Jabir bin Hayyan Trust Islamabad. College is drawing its intake from the backward classes and areas where our community is in majority but poor and below poverty line. The college has been able to show excellent results at matriculation level during the last two years. The total GPA of the college was 5.42; the highest compared all the institutions whose students appeared in the Federal Board’s Matriculation Examination. 95% of the students belong to our community and are hopes of our future. The college campus is spread over 4 Acres of land. Water Tower of such a complex has been estimated at cost of 7 Million. Present arrangements do not meet even the drinking water needs of the students. College does not have sufficient funds to accomplish the envisaged project of constructing a water tower costing 7 Million and it may take years to get such a donation for water supply scheme for the Campus. To provide immediate relief to 300 students of ages 10-15 years, living in the hostel, we have thought of providing them water storage Tanks. These will meet the needs for drinking water and washing / bathing facilities of the hostel block and cooking arrangements in the Mess. The most economical way of making college, self sufficient in this crucial area is to provide fiberglass water tanks of the capacity of 1800 gallons * 4 tanks costing about Rs 62000 each. College has the well and an underground water tank. The requirement is the storage capacity of 7200 gallons water and two motor pumps to lift the water to the fifth floor. The total estimated cost is amount PKR 377,220.00
 
  1. Water supply scheme for Village Bagla, District Abbottabad, Pakistan. (This locality is on top of a mountain and people are generally shepherds)
 
  1. Water Supply Scheme, Riati, and Pakistan COMMENTS by a lady: A 95 years old lady of the village remarked “I am thankful to these unknown people who got us water, that was right under our feet. I spent all my youth bringing water from one Km down the hill on my head thus travelling 2 Kms for every pitcher.  It was most agonizing part of my life and of the life of all the ladies of these 20 families that live here. My youth cannot be brought back but our children will be spared of this donkey work. Our men have been so callous to our agony, they could have pool resources for collective good but they never came out of their petty differences, jealousy and distrust. They never cared for us, the women, who are their mothers, sisters and daughters. May Allah bless all those who took part in this work.”
 
  1. Mairlan Water Pump, Pakistan
 
  1. Avalkonda, Nellore, Chitoor District, Karnataka {February 2007}
 
  1. Masjid Zahra, Dandopur, Allahabad (UP)
 
  1. Masjid Mir Madad Ali, Lucknow (UP)
  2. Fatima Girls Inter College, Azamgarh (U.P.)
  3. Priyapatna District, Karnatka, South India – Two water bore wells
  4. Masjid at Matloobpur, Jalalpur, Ambedkar Nagar (UP)
  5. Jama Masjid, Baskhari, Ambedkar Nagar (UP).
  6. Shia Qabrastan, Jam Mohalla, Bhusawal, Jalagaon (MS).
  7. Moamineen 90 Family, Aval-Konda, Chittore (A.P.).
  8. Shia Isna Ashari Qabrastan, Aval-Konda, Chittore (A.P.).
  9. Imambara Dayar-e-Haideri, Jafarabad, Jalalpur, Ambedkar Nagar, U.P.
 
  1. Husaini Masjid, Usmanpur, Jalalpur, Ambedkar Nagar, U.P.
  2. Shia Jama Masjid, Rasra, Ballia (U.P.).
  3. Masjid Haji Amjad, Jafarabad, Jalalpur, Ambedkar Nagar, U.P.
  4. Chhoti Dargah, Karimpur, Nagpur, Jalalpur, Ambedkar Nagar, U.P.
  5. Masjid Chauhatta, Karimpur, Nagpur, Jalalpur, Ambedkar Nagar. U.P.
  6. Choti Masjid, Jafarabad, Jalalpur, Ambedkar Nagar, U.P.
  7. Masjid Masoomia, Usmanpur, Jalalpur, Ambedkar Nagar, U.P.
  8. Masjid Sajjadiyya, Jafarabad, Jalalpur,
  9. Imambara Dayar-e-Haidari, Jafarabad, Jalalpur, Ambedkarnagar, U.P.
  10. Husaini Masjid, Usmanpur, Ambedkarnagar (U.P.).
  11. Masjid Alavy Jafarbad,Jalalpur District Ambedkar Nagar
  12. Masjid Sown Gaon Jafarabad,Jalalpur District Ambedkar Nagar
  13. Madrasa Zainabia Karimapur, Niswan District Ambedkar Nagar
  14. Madrasa Zainabia Karimapur, Niswan District Ambedkar Nagar
 
  1. Masjid Sipah, District Ambedkar Nagar
  2. Hussaini Masjid Hussainabad, District Ambedkar Nagar
  3. Maktab Imamia Jafarabad, Jalalpur Jafariya District Ambedkar Nagar
 
  1. Sadar Imambara Jafarabad, Jalalpur District Ambedkar Nagar
  2. Masjid Matloobpur District Ambedkar Nagar
  3. Masjid Mustafabad District Ambedkar Nagar
 
  1. Hussainia Jafarabad, Jalapur, Zulfekariya District Ambedkar Nagar
  2. Masjid Kareli Tal Mustafabad, District Ambedkar Nagar
  3. Jama Masjid Buskhri, District Ambedkar Nagar
 
  1. Zainabia Ashurkhana Kiradpura, Aurangabad, (MS).
  2. Old Ashoorkhana Shah Bazaar, Aurangabad, (MS).
At all the above sites, water is available to the General Public for 24 hours.
4th
Oct
2016

A loving mother and wife seeks your support to save her life – let us help fund Farzana’s lifesaving treatment


October 2016 Dear LFCT Donors Please Hold your hands together to help this needy patient Farzana Bibi, aged 47, belongs to a low income family of Rawalpindi District in Pakistan’s Punjab province. About three months ago, Farzana Bibi’s life took a turn for the worst when she was diagnosed with Hepatitis Type-C (HCV). Hepatitis C is a virus that can infect the liver. If left untreated, it can sometimes cause serious and potentially life-threatening damage to the liver over many years. 1 Now, she has been advised comprehensive medical treatment for three months to clear her illness. Her Doctor has advised Sovaldi (400 mg) for three months. The cost of this treatment is PKR 37,000.00/£275 per month. Farzana Bibi’s impoverished family cannot simply afford the cost of such treatment. Her husband, Muhammad Rafiq is a laborer by profession and his total income from all sources is approximately PKR 15000.00/£111 per month. As a father of two children who all are dependent on him, Muhammad Rafiq cannot afford the expenses of his wife’s treatment. The family struggle as it is to pay all of their living expenses and live month by month. They have tried to borrow from friends and family but have struggled to accumulate funds. Their two children are in school and it is a crucial time for them both, doing their exams and thinking about their futures. Their mother’s illness is constantly in the back of their minds – they know the drugs are out there to treat her, but they are still out of reach. The family has therefore approached The Lady Fatemah (AS) Trust (LFT) and MICT to seek PKR 111,000.00/£824 for meeting the cost of Farzana Bibi’s treatment procedure, to rid her of her life threatening condition.   Dear LFCT supporters, please donate towards this project today and help save Farzana Bibi, mother and wife’s life today. Thank you.   Family Data:  
Name Status Age Occupation
Muhammad Rafiq Husband 50 Years Laborer
Farzana Bibi Applicant 47 Years Housewife
Muhammad Haroon Son 17 Years Student
Muhammad Faizan Son 16 Years Student
  Financial Details of Farzana Bibi:-  
Estimated Cost for three month treatment @ PKR 37,000.00 per month PKR 111,000.00
Total Cost In US Dollars $ 1,069.00
In GB Pounds £824.00
In Canadian Dollars $ 1,403.00
In EURO € 950.00
5th
Oct
2016

Education: the most important tool for Mohammed and his six siblings – after the tragic death of their father, their mother is determined her children will finish school


2 Mohammed is nine years old and is one of seven orphans who live with their mother in Kerbala. The family are struggling, living in a house that is inadequate for their needs. The family are residing in a house belonging to the visitors of Imam Hussain (as). The family occupy the first floor. This floor has no kitchen and so all their cooking must be done outside. This means looking under the hot sun and in the cold winter. The family faced a tragedy when the father died in a terrorist attack. He was an innocent victim, leaving a large family of young children behind. However, the priority for Mohammed’s mother is that her children all continue to study. This is the most important activity for them to continue – she knows it will help them have a positive future with lots of opportunities. With the help of the LFCT, it is possible that all seven children are able to stay in school. This is because the LFCT is providing $30 sponsorship per month for each student that stays in school. Taking part in the microfinance project selling to relatives and neighbours, the family have additional support which will help them in becoming self-sufficient. Mohammed is doing well in his studies and is in the fourth grade in Primary school. Because Mohammed is able to continue to study he stands a much better chance of a higher earning job, a healthier and happier life. He is much less likely to fall into crime and more likely to become a member of society that gives back to his community. Unicef has been warning that children in Iraq are at “serious risk” of death, injury, sexual violence, abduction and recruitment into armed groups. (AP) In its report, ‘A Heavy Price for Children’, Unicef called on warring parties in Iraq to protect children’s rights and said the number of youngsters at serious risk in the country increases. It describes Iraq as “one of the most dangerous places in the world for children”. Iraq struggles to cope with these sheer numbers of orphans being created every day. Children are the ones that suffer the most in Iraq’s ongoing violence. The repercussions can be felt everywhere, rippling out across society, threatening to have long term damage – it is thought that 7 in 10 orphaned boys are likely to become career criminals and girls much more likely to turn to prostitution. Income generation and schooling in Iraq is severely affected and yet with the LFCT’s joint programmes, both widows and orphans can be supported with the view that widows will become long term self-sufficient once their micro-finance business selling clothing begins to grow with their confidence and newly acquired skills. Please help a little boy like Mohammed today and sponsor an orphan through the LFCT’s flagship programme. Signed by : Ms Saly Naser and Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar
10th
Oct
2016

300,000 children starving to death in Yemen – Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust Urgent Appeal


KGM   Photograph Krishnan Guru-Murthy/ITC, courtesy of The Guardian, 6th October, 2016     “People are gathered around a bed in the emergency ward of Al-Sabeen children’s hospital in Sana’a, the Yemeni capital. Five-month-old Atan is being examined while lying next to another struggling baby. He’s tiny, and his breathing is fast and shallow. His father is staring glassy-eyed while his mother holds an oxygen tube near the boy’s face. She’s wearing a niqab so all I can see are her eyes. There are no tears, but a terrible look of fear. Across the bed, a doctor frantically checks the baby over and demands urgently: “When was the last time he ate?” There is no answer. Atan is severely malnourished. He’s been starving – as has his mother. She’s been eating so little she’s unable to breastfeed any more. She tried giving him goat’s milk, but it gave him diarrhoea,” Krishnan Guru-Murthy, The Guardian, October 6th, 2016. Atan’s story is typical of an estimated 300,000 children in Yemen that are currently malnourished. This estimate is conservative. Over 82% of the population require some sort of humanitarian assistance. Children have once again become the largest sufferers of war as a Saudi-led coalition against Houthi rebels continues to bear down on the country. With strategic airstrikes on key ports and factories, Yemen, who is dependent on importing most of its food supply, has simply not got enough food to feed its starving children. Ironically, bags of flour lie at ports but cranes at the ports have been destroyed so the flour lies in bags, rotting. One cooking oil factory that provided 40% of Yemen’s oil has also gone up in flames. The food that is available is extortionate and many poor families have no choice but to go hungry. These cruel tactics of war are slowly starving a nation. It is the children that are dying first. The lack of food has now become critical, mothers who are themselves malnourished cannot provide milk for their children. Children are being fed bread dipped in goats milk, they become thinner, their tummies bulge and they begin to lose critical muscle. Parents watch on in anguish – they have been made powerless to do anything. There is aid getting through, but it is still not enough. The LFCT would like to do their bit and provide some emergency food assistance to children on the brink of starvation. We need your help to do this. No child should go hungry in 2016. No child should die of starvation. Please donate what you can – perhaps skip a meal out with friends and family and donate what you would have spent to feed a child in Yemen. Thank you.     For more information about Yemen, you can watch Channel 4’s Unreported Word, Yemen: Britain’s Unseen War on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RLaLw1HLgc   Link to Guardian article: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/oct/06/we-saw-how-yemen-children-slowly-starving-to-death-krishnan-guru-murthy
17th
Oct
2016

Promising Pharmacology student who dreams of helping her community needs your help


October 2016   Promising Pharmacology student who dreams of helping her community needs your help   14741869_623684491135020_2133784693_n   Family Data  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation
Mohsin Hamid Ridha Father 45 Accountant
Zainab Abdul Hussain Mohsin Mother 43 Housewife
Hiba Allah Mohsin Hamid Applicant 18 Student
Fatima Mohsin Hamid Sibling 20 Student
Hawraa Mohsin Hamid Sibling 19 Student
Sur AlDin Mohsin Hamid Sibling 17 Student
Shams AlDin Mohsin Hamid Sibling 13 Student
Tabark AlRahman Mohsin Hamid Sibling 10 Student
Mohammed Hussain Mohsin Hamid Sibling 16 Student
Asad Allah Mohsin Hamid Sibling 3                /
  Sister Hiba Allah Muhsin Hamid is an excellent student, achieving and average of 93% in her final year of Secondary School. She has just started at college – the College of Pharmacy at the AhluBait University. Hiba has always dreamed of being a Pharmacist. She always knew it would be a very competitive degree if she were to be eligible for a grant. Hiba narrowly missed out on a grant that would have paid all of her fees, she would have needed to make 95% on her examinations, she reached 93%. Hiba lives within a large family of ten members. They are a Sadaa family, working in the humanitarian field. The family depends on the father to support the whole family, however, his low income struggles the stretch to cover their daily living needs. The University Hiba is attending requires tuition fees of US$ 6,500.00. The course is split over five years. In order to make the dream true for Hiba, the family have asked the LFCT for support with tuition fees. Hiba’s father is able to cover the rest of the needs such as transportation, buying books, clothes and stationaries but without the support of the LFCT, Hiba will not be able to continue studying.   Sister Hiba Allah Muhsin Hamid was one of the students of AlSalihat Secondary Private School that passed the sixth secondary school successfully with high marks as under  
Material Marks achieved
Islamic Education 99.00%
Arabic 91.00%
English 92.00%
Biology 98.00%
Math 85.00%
Chemical 93.00%
Physics 91.00%
  Hiba hopes to serve her community as a pharmacist when she graduates, assist people in their time of need. Studying in Pharmacology, Hiba will be able to give back to society. Please, LFCT donors, let us help Hiba finish her studies without having to worry about the tuition fees.   Thank you.
1st
Jan
1970

It is WORLD FOOD DAY – please help feed a starving child in Yemen today: 300,000 children are starving to death.


October 2016     Yemen IIYemen I Photograph Krishnan Guru-Murthy/ITC, courtesy of The Guardian, 6th October,2016; Photograph AP, courtesy of The Independent, Tuesday, 29th March, 2016     “People are gathered around a bed in the emergency ward of Al-Sabeen children’s hospital in Sana’a, the Yemeni capital. Five-month-old Atan is being examined while lying next to another struggling baby. He’s tiny, and his breathing is fast and shallow. His father is staring glassy-eyed while his mother holds an oxygen tube near the boy’s face. She’s wearing a niqab so all I can see are her eyes. There are no tears, but a terrible look of fear. Across the bed, a doctor frantically checks the baby over and demands urgently: “When was the last time he ate?” There is no answer. Atan is severely malnourished. He’s been starving – as has his mother. She’s been eating so little she’s unable to breastfeed any more. She tried giving him goat’s milk, but it gave him diarrhoea,” Krishnan Guru-Murthy, The Guardian, October 6th, 2016. Atan’s story is typical of an estimated 300,000 children in Yemen that are currently malnourished. This estimate is conservative. Over 82% of the population require some sort of humanitarian assistance. Children have once again become the largest sufferers of war as a Saudi-led coalition against Houthi rebels continues to bear down on the country. With strategic airstrikes on key ports and factories, Yemen, who is dependent on importing most of its food supply, has simply not got enough food to feed its starving children. Ironically, bags of flour lie at ports but cranes at the ports have been destroyed so the flour lies in bags, rotting. One cooking oil factory that provided 40% of Yemen’s oil has also gone up in flames. The food that is available is extortionate and many poor families have no choice but to go hungry. These cruel tactics of war are slowly starving a nation. It is the children that are dying first. The lack of food has now become critical, mothers who are themselves malnourished cannot provide milk for their children. Children are being fed bread dipped in goats milk, they become thinner, their tummies bulge and they begin to lose critical muscle. Parents watch on in anguish – they have been made powerless to do anything. There is aid getting through, but it is still not enough. The LFCT would like to do their bit and provide some emergency food assistance to children on the brink of starvation. We need your help to do this. No child should go hungry in 2016. No child should die of starvation. Please donate what you can – perhaps skip a meal out with friends and family and donate what you would have spent to feed a child in Yemen.   Thank you.   For more information about Yemen, you can watch Channel 4’s Unreported Word, Yemen: Britain’s Unseen War on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RLaLw1HLgc Link to Guardian article: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/oct/06/we-saw-how-yemen-children-slowly-starving-to-death-krishnan-guru-murthy   For more information about Yemen, you can watch Channel 4’s Unreported Word, Yemen: Britain’s Unseen War on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RLaLw1HLgc   Link to Guardian article: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/oct/06/we-saw-how-yemen-children-slowly-starving-to-death-krishnan-guru-murthy
20th
Oct
2016

Giving three boys the education they deserve


October 2016       Lebanon Education Zainab has three children. Her husband, Nader Hamada had a second marriage and has a young child with his second wife. Nader Hamada works one day a week, usually in manual labour. He regularly has five or more days a week without work. Nader Hamada is acting as a responsible father. He has no care if his children skip school and does not believe they need an education. As a result, Zainab has been forced into poorly paid domestic work.   The LFCT has covered last two school years for Zainab’s three children including transportation. The youngest, Mohamad and Abdallah have both passed their classes but Ali has struggled and as a result, has not yet passed. He has been bought down by his father who wishes him to bring in money to the family and does not support his schooling.   An additional problem is putting stress on Zainab and the family. She suffers from a severe back problem that leads to her staying in bed sometimes for more than two months at a time. Ali as the eldest son, often has to take care of his mother as his father is not looking after her when she needs help the most.   Zainab has agreed to work under LFCT terms and conditions to work with the Manessa workshop. Zainab has done a trial period and her stitching is high in quality. She will begin in the workshop in the near future and in the meantime, she is appealing to the LFCT to support her boys in their next year of studying whilst she gets herself back on her feet.   The children will be studying at Habboush Elementary School.   Please help Zainab’s three boys get a good start and continue their education. Their mother is passionate that they study and wants to help them to realise their dreams. She has worked tirelessly to assist them, despite her own long term health issues.   Thank you LFCT supporters for giving these three boys a chance.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant DoB Occupation Income
Zainab Hassan Roumani Mother 1965 Domestic Worker varied
Nader Deeb Hamada Father 1976 Daily worker Not fixed salary
Ali Nader Hamada Applicant 2003 G 4TH Student
Mohamad Nader Hamada Applicant 2006 G 5TH Student
Abdallah Nader Hamada Applicant 2012 G 6TH Student
  Cost of education:  
Description Fees LBP Fees USD Fees GBP
Transportation for 3 kids per year      900,000.00 $600.00 £497.24
Registration for 3 kids      500,000.00 $333.00 £276.24
Stationary for 3 kids      200,000.00 $133.00 £110.50
 Total Fees Needed for 2016 1,600,000.00 $1,066.00 £883.98
  Signed by: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Chair Lady / Managing Trustee Manessa Association.
24th
Oct
2016

Orphan Sayyidah Nabaa is determined not to give up her dream of becoming a Doctor


October 2016     Nabaa Muthana   Sayyidah Nabaa Muthana Jaffar Kathum AlMusawi lives with her mother and three sisters. Their father was killed back in 2006 in Dayala when Nabaa was just 6 years old. Her youngest sister had only just been born and cannot remember her father. She only has a few photographs to remember him by. The family are now living in a small rented house in Kerbala. With no men in the family and three young children, the family find getting by very difficult. There is no-one else to look after the children and Zainab, Sayyidah Nabaa’s mother, must fit work around bringing up young children.   Sayyidah Nabaa would love to become Doctor. Ever since a young age she has been fascinated in helping others and health. Nabaa and her sisters have not skipped or missed out on education despite their difficult circumstances. Sayyidah Nabaa is certainly not willing to give up her dream of becoming a Doctor easily!   Sayyidah Nabaa’s mother would love more than anything to support her daughter to study Medicine, but the reality is that there is no spare income for this. Sayyidah Nabaa is appealing to the LFCT supporters to fund her final two years of Secondary school followed by four years of Medical College and, if she gets the grades to be admitted, a further two years to finish her Medicine degree.   The estimated cost is US$ 1,000.00 per year to support Sayyidah Nabaa in her journey. Could you be one of her supporters?   Thank you.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation
Zainab Adnan Kathum Mother 36 Housewife
Nabaa Muthana Applicant 16 Student
Tabarak Muthana Sibling 18 Student
Gadir Muthana Sibling 13 Student
Abrar Muthana Sibling 10 Student
  Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, Project Manager, Karbala, Iraq
1st
Jan
1970

By helping just one individual, we can help a whole family


October 2016   Zainab Ali   Sayyidah Zainab Ali Aziz AlMusawi is in the sixth year of Secondary school. In 2007 Sayyidah Zainab’s life changed forever when her father died suddenly of a heart attack. Sayyidah Zainab’s mother was left alone to look after five children, the youngest only a baby. The family have struggled for nearly a decade, yet their mother has always prioritized education. Now, she hopes it will pay off.   Sayyidah Zainab’s wishes are to study accounting and finance after finishing school. She knows that the situation of her family means she will need to rely on the kindness and goodwill of others to help her continue her studies all the way through to graduation.   Sayyidah Zainab is a conscientious student, averaging 75% in her latest examinations. She excels in mathematics and would love to make a career out of it. Zainab hopes that she will earn a good wage and be able to support her younger siblings though their education also.   Sayyidah Zainab is appealing to the LFCT for assistance with her fees and transportation to study. The cost of this is $1,000.00 per year. With a little investment in her future, Sayyidah Zainab can become a strong role model for her younger siblings and community members. By helping just one individual, we can help a whole family.   Can you make a donation towards Sayyidah Zainab and her family’s future? A little will go a long way to helping this bright young student flourish.   Thank you.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation
Nadia Ridha Hamad Mother 40 Housewife
Zainab Ali Aziz Applicant 20 Student
Hussain Ali Aziz Sibling 22 Student
Fatima Ali Aziz Sibling 15 Student
Sara Ali Aziz Sibling 13 Student
Abir Ali Aziz Sibling 9 Student
  Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, Project Manager, Karbala, Iraq  
1st
Jan
1970

Can you help with a donation towards securing Orphan Sayyid Mohammed’s future? Together we can train an aspiring young Doctor whose ambition in life is to give back to his community.


October 2016   Mohammed Sahib     Sayyid Mohmmed Sahib Salman Mohammed dreams of being a Doctor. He will never know what truly happened to his father. The terrorists who kidnapped him passed on a message to the family to say that he died of a heart attack in 2009. Mohammed often thinks about his father and hopes one day that he can prevent someone else’s father dying from a heart attack.   Sayyid Mohammed’s dream to become a doctor relies on a good education and University degree. He is currently in the third year of Secondary school and has three years left followed by a further four in college to study medicine. He will then be on his way to becoming a Doctor. Achieving 75% overall in his examinations last year, Mohammed is a bright student and is determined to succeed.   Unfortunately Sayyid Mohammed’s mother cannot afford to support her son through his education. Although several of the family members work, they too have now got their own families and the family is already very large. Sometimes, even putting enough food on the table is difficult. Mohammed’s mother tries extremely hard but bringing up the family on her own means her time for income generation is limited, especially somewhere like Iraq.   Sayyid Mohammed is appealing to the LFCT for support to start off his medical career, helping others to live healthy lives and flourish. The LFCT would like to support Mohammed with $1,000 per year to pay for tuition and transport. Can you help with a donation towards securing Sayyid Mohammed’s future? Together we can train an aspiring young Doctor whose ambition in life is to give back to his community.   Thank you.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation
Hanaa Aziz Mahdi Mother 50 Housewife
Mohammed Sahib Salman Applicant 17 Student
Rusul Sahib Salman Sibling 19 Unemployed
Ali Sahib Salman Sibling 15 Student
Moamel Sahib Salman Sibling 8 Student
Saif Sahib Salman Sibling 26 Hairdresser
Hasan Sahib Salman Sibling 22 Solider
Qusai Sahib Salman Sibling 35 Solider
Hadeel Sahib Salman Sibling 30 Unemployed
Ridha Sahib Salman Sibling 32 Solider
  Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, Project Manager, Karbala, Iraq    
1st
Jan
1970

Orphan Budding engineer with big plans to rebuild his country seeks your help


October 2016   Mohammed Mahmood   Sayyid Mohammed Mahmood is one of eight children all under sole care by their mother. In 2011 their father tragically passed away leaving Mohammed’s mother to look after all eight children. The family were forced to flee Baghdad and move to Kerbala due to heightened fighting and now live in a Government protected area. When Mohammed’s father was alive they felt more of a degree of protection, but with some very young children, the family decided it was safer, in the long turn, to relocate.   Sayyid Mohammed’s family rely only on the daily labourer wage of their eldest sibling. Sayyid Mohammed’s mother has recently enrolled into the widow’s microfinance programme and is looking forward to the additional and much needed income this will bring.   Sayyid Mohammed is in his third year at Secondary school. The Government school he is in is very poor and his family scrape by so that he can have vital additional tuition to keep his grades high. He recently obtained 72% at his last end of year examinations. Mohammed has just one year of school left before he hopes to go on to study engineering in college. It is vital that Mohammed keeps his grades high as he finishes this final year of school. In order to do this Mohammed is appealing to the generous supporters of the LFCT to help him through this vital time and assist him in getting into college. The cost will be $1,000 for tuition and support. The LFCT will closely monitor Mohamed’s progress and if her continue to do well and work hard, aim to support him all the way through his college degree at $1,000 per year.   Sayyid Mohammed has seen how many families are without decent homes and living solutions across Iraq and hopes to work in this field when he finishes studying, rebuilding his country once more.   Thank you.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation
Intedhar Mahdi Abid AlSada Mother 40 Housewife
Mohmmed Mahmood Applicant 16 Student
Ali Mahmood Sibling 20 Student
Hussain Mahmood Sibling 18 Student
Zahraa Mahmood Sibling 17 Student
Hawraa Mahmood Sibling 16 Student
Zainab Mahmod Sibling 13 Student
Ruqaia Mahmood Sibling 10 Student
Muqtada Mahmood Sibling 7 Student
  Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, Project Manager, Karbala, Iraq  
1st
Jan
1970

A ticket out of poverty for Orphan Sayyidah Fatimah and her family


October 2016   Fatima Kathum     Sayyidah Fatimah Kathum Ridha Hashim AlMusawy now lives with her Aunt, Grandparents, Mother and Siblings in Kerbala. The whole family were forced to relocate from Baghdad in 2006. Sayyidah Fatimah’s father, who worked for the industry military, was returning home from work one day when he was kidnapped and brutally murdered. The whole family fled, taking with them only the possessions they could carry. They left their house and furniture behind and relocated. Starting from scratch again in a different city has been very difficult. The children faced disrupted schooling and Sayyidah Fatimah’s mother has found it difficult to get by. The family have been relying on the assistance of charities but recently Fatimah’s mother has become involved in the LFCT’s widows microfinance project. She hopes this will life the family out of poverty, but knows it will take her time to become established.   Sayyidah Fatimah is the middle child with four siblings. They are all studying, her elder siblings have nearly finished their courses but for Sayyidah Fatimah, this is a crucial time. Sayyidah Fatimah is concerned that she might have to drop out of school to help the family until her mother becomes more established. She is currently in the third year of secondary school and is seeking assistance to carry on her schooling in another school that will provide her with a better quality education. She is a bright and capable student, achieving 61% in her last examinations. The school she is currently in will not provide her with the knowledge and skills she needs to get into Law College. Her dream is to study to be a lawyer.   Sayyidah Fatimah has two years left of school before college and to assist her to become a Lawyer and support her whole family to live a comfortable life, she is requesting US$1,000.00 per year to pay for her fees, transport and essential school supplies.   With your help, Sayyidah Fatimah can finish her education and follow her dream. An education will be a ticket out of poverty for Fatimah and her whole family.   Thank you.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation
Madiha Hamdan Aati Mother 48 Housewife
Fatima Kathum Ridha Applicant 18 Student
Israa Kathum Ridha Sibling 21 Student
Athraa Kathum Ridha Sibling 19 Student
Mustafa Kathum Ridha Sibling 16 Student
Shams Kathum Ridha Sibling 12 Student
  Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, Project Manager, Karbala, Iraq
1st
Jan
1970

Giving a family some long overdue good news – helping Fatima go to University after finally escaping an abusive home life


October 2016 IMG-20161008-WA0063   Fatima Ali Shouman lives with her mother and two siblings in Lebanon. Fatima’s mother Sawsan got divorced in September 2016 after suffering long term domestic abuse – physical hitting and her husband depriving her and her children. Many times her husband hit her causing scars to appear on her face and body. These were witnessed by all of her neighbours and work colleagues. The husband, Ali then fell in love with a young Syrian lady and increased his aggressive actions towards the family, forcing Sawsan to divorce without being paid her “Mahr” (dowry) . Mahdi, Sawsan’s eldest son decided to enrol in the military to help his mother and pay for the family’s living costs. He stopped university and enrolled in the Lebanese army for two months. He is in the training period and not receiving his monthly salary yet. Mahdi will reassume his study in telecommunication engineering when he receives his fixed salary. The father’s abusive nature has deprived his brilliant daughter, Fatima of education. She has been unable to attend official High School and was kept at home. Her father also forced her to get engaged to a man 14 years older than her. This year, since her father has left, Fatima applied for her national exam and passed with flying marks – a distinction.   Mahdi and Fatima’s father refuses to financially support his children – stating that Fatima has a fiancé now and that Mahdi is an adult in his own right. Mahdi and Fatima have a younger sibling, Noor, who is just nine years old. She has been badly affected by all of the domestic violence she has witnessed and is reserved and shy.   Fatima is trying to remove herself from her arranged marriage so that she can study and has been accepted onto a Pharmacology course at Lebanese International University. Just 20 students were accepted – it is very competitive and Fatima has been awarded with a place.   In her present financial situation, Fatima is uncertain if she will be able to fill this place. Sawsan has tried to elicit support from numerous charitable organisations and Universities themselves to substitute her daughter’s fees. Unfortunately, Fatima needs the funding now in order to take her prestigious place at University. Fatima and her mother are appealing to the LFCT for this support. They hope to secure other funding next year. Fatima’s full term of study will be five years. For this first year she requires $4,470 USD. Without this assistance, Fatima will not be able to attend University and will be sure to have to marry.   Can you help Fatima today? She will provide a strong role model to her sister Noor, and this is just the sort of good news that the family need after facing years of domestic violence and a family break up.   Thank you   Signed by: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Chair Lady / Managing Trustee Manessa Association.  
1st
Jan
1970

Education is a right for all – Three siblings need our help to flourish


October 2016 SallyRawamHassan   Zainab and her husband fled Syria and now live in Lebanon with their family. Life in Lebanon is tough, but much better than facing the threat from violence in Syria. Zainab’s husband, Abdo has prostate cancer and diabetes. Due to his sickness, he can no longer work as a tiling instructor as he was previously. Zainab and Abdo’s s eldest son was forced to leave school to work as a daily worker and for five years. He is the breadwinner for the family. He now works as a driver earning 400 USD per month, this is more than he was earning as a labourer, but barely enough for a whole family to live off.  The second son, Hassan, has enrolled in Nabatieh Public Technical Institute. Last year he was forced to discontinue his education because the family could not afford paying 100 USD per month for him to attend. Their daughter, Sally was enrolled in her village High School but the level of schooling was very poor and she failed in the official national High School exam this year. She has now gone on to Arab Saleem High school for one week to attend an empowering students program and has found a great difference in the education levels. It is critical that Sally passes the official exam to be eligible to continue her education in university.   Rawan, the younger sibling is attending this same village High School. Zainab and Abdo are worried that both their daughters will fail their exams if they do not get the opportunity to study at a better school.   The family are in no position to pay for better private schooling for their children. They are in over 10,000USD worth of debt from medical procedures for Abdo, and no one in the family has medical insurance.   The family are appealing for education assistance for Hassan, Sally and Rawan. For Hassan to continue in college, for Sally and Rawan to finish their High School education at a better quality private institute. Here they will get the support they need to flourish. Sally’s dream is to study film, and Hassan’s to be a civil engineer. The children believe they can lift the family out of poverty but need some support to help them achieve the best they can.   Please help to contribute towards Hassan, Sally and Rawan’s futures today.   Thank you.   Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Abdo Akil Father 24/12/1959 Tiling Installing $0.00
Zainab Mother 20/09/1966 Stitching Designer $500.00
Mohamad Brother 19/04/1991 Driver $400.00
Hassan Applicant 26/04/1994 Student $0.00
Sally Applicant 14/04/1999 Student $0.00
Rawan Applicant 29/09/2000 Student $0.00
  Tuition per year – requesting LFCT cover half of these costs at $1,360.50  
Description Hassan Sally Rawan
Tuition per year $297.00 $162.00 $162.00
Transport per year $900.00 $600.00 $600.00
Budget per Student $1,197.00 $762.00 $762.00
TOTAL Budget $2,721.00
  Signed by: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Chair Lady / Managing Trustee Manessa Association.
7th
Nov
2016

Restoring the road to independence – appeal from villagers in Kot Jindan, Pakistan


    appeal iiiappeal iappeal ii     Kot Jindan is a small village between the mountains behind Islamabad, Pakistan. The village has a population of 3,000 people with approximately 200 of them coming to Islamabad for work, medical facilities and studies. The road they travel on is 5 – 6 Km long. However the road is in a very poor condition. It is uneven, rocky and crumbling. First it climbs a steep mountain before descending down into the valley where the village is. As the road comes into the valley it becomes very muddy. For the villagers, the road is vital. They have tried to repair and stabilise the road in parts using their own savings.   Accessing Islamabad brings lifeline to villagers, who through hard work and dedication are working their hardest to make a better living for their families and community.   The villagers of Kot Jindan are appealing to the LFCT for 200 bags of cement at a cost of PKR 120,000.00 / £917.00 / US$ 1,135.00 to concrete the remaining unpassable and unstable section of the road. The villagers will provide the gravel and labour themselves to ensure the work is completed in a cost effective manner and for them to take ownership of the project.   With a little bit of help to get the road in a better working order the villagers will be able to continue working and travelling into Islamabad. The journey will be made much easier and quicker and the villagers will be able to use motorcycles and small cars once again. Young adults in the village will be able to attend college and University and continue on a path of independence.   Please help to enable the villagers to repair the road by donating a bag of cement or two for the villagers – one bag of cement costs less than £5.00.   Thank you.  
14th
Nov
2016

Equipping Hirjan and her siblings with the tools to finish education and stand on their own two feet


  November 2015   Orphan appeal       Youngest of six siblings, Hirjan lost her father in 2012 when she was just a few months old. Hirjan has no memory of her father – he simply didn’t return home one day. He was brutally attacked died from his injuries on his way home from his field one day.   Hirjan’s father was the family breadwinner and since his loss they have all suffered not only emotionally to adjust but also to simply get by. They moved in with relatives and together with their support are able to live a simple existence, Hirjan’s siblings are in school and her eldest brother is due to finish secondary school soon – it is the family’s dream that all of the children can continue in education for as long as possible. The same dream that parents around the world have for their children.   Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history.   Iraq struggles to cope with these sheer numbers of orphans. Children are the ones that suffer the most in Iraq’s ongoing violence. The repercussions can be felt everywhere, rippling out across society, threatening to have long term damage – it is thought that 7 in 10 orphaned boys are likely to become career criminals and girls much more likely to turn to prostitution.   Income generation and schooling in Iraq is severely affected and yet with the LFCT’s joint programmes, both widows and orphans can be supported with the view that widows will become long term self-sufficient once their micro-finance business selling clothing begins to grow with their confidence and newly acquired skills. They have the passion and determination and just need a hand up to get started.   Please help to support LFCT’s flagship programme today. With your support they can thrive. Thank you. $30 per month will pay for an orphan like Hirjan’s living and schooling needs, equipping her with the tools to thrive and stand on her own two feet.   Thank you.
5th
Dec
2016

Family need a helping hand getting back on their feet


December 2016 Please read below and share a thought for this family today. Any assistance to help them during this difficult time will be greatly received.     i     A loving mother and wife passed away today. Our thoughts and prayers are with her family. Amina Wanjiru lived in the slums of Dandora, Kenya with her husband Mohammed and three children. The eldest daughter is Fatima, aged 19 who recently finished high school and now sits at home as the family can’t afford to pay for higher education. Muslim, who is in form two had to stop going to school midway through the 3rd term as the family can no longer afford to pay for her fees. The youngest son Yusuf, aged just 9 is still only in class standard four, but sadly with the family’s only breadwinner no longer able to work he might end up dropping out especially now that his mother has passed away.   This has been the chain of events since Amina got hit by a car several months ago. Amina and her colleague were heading home from work and when crossing the road, they both got hit by a car and tragically, Amina broke her leg in the process. The driver did not stop away and since Amina was helped to hospital by some neighbours. She was taken to Kenyatta Hospital which is a public hospital where her initial diagnosis confirmed that her leg was broken and she would require surgery to insert a plate to heal the broken bone. For one month she was kept at the hospital despite the neighbours having managed to get funds to purchase the plate as advised by the doctor. Amina was not making a recovery and the bill was accumulating. The neighbours decided to move her to Langata Hospital they had relatives working. Due to poor treatment at the public hospital, her leg wound had become infected. Surgery was undertaken at the new hospital and her infected wound was treated and the metal plate inserted. She was then released after a week of observation. She was then going to the doctor on a weekly basis. Alhamdulillah, the neighbours managed to clear that bill with the help of well-wishers which amounted to approximately £4,200.00. Amina’s husband lost his job after dedicating his time to Amina’s recovery and spending time at her bedside.   After a few weeks, Amina was at the hospital when she felt very dizzy. The doctors found that she was extremely dehydrated and her wound infected which had caused her to have a fever. She was then hospitalised for approximately two weeks and the doctors treated her to speed up her recovery. Due to lack of funds, she had a lack of vitamins and was considered to be underweight which was unsafe for her.   This afternoon (25.11.16) her husband called the neighbours and informed of her demise. The neighbours are now appealing for assisting with the final bill which totals £1,600. The neighbours will try and help Amina’s family bear the loss of a wife and mother. Any additional support for the family will also be a huge support at this time.   Dear LFCT donors, please open your hearts and pray for the family during this time of loss. Let us help relieve some of the pain the family are feeling and assist them in paying the final medical bill and supporting them whilst they get back on their own two feet. Thank you on behalf of the neighbours of the family.   Thank you.
8th
Dec
2016

The chance to stand on their own two feet – school lunch programme for orphaned girls in Kerbala


December 2016   WIMG-20161126-WA0005W15320482_10209735370074573_842480357_nWIMG-20161126-WA0006   The chance to stand on their own two feet – school lunch programme for orphaned girls in Kerbala In Iraq, thirty-four percent of girls do not advance to secondary education and thirty per cent of women are illiterate (DRF, 2016). The LFCT and its partner in Iraq, the Development and Relief Foundation (DRF) believes women play an important role in society. However, women and girls are unfairly disadvantaged, and often fall behind in education and the chance to take charge of their own futures. For these reasons, DRF purchased land, acquired permits, and laid the foundation for a new girl’s school, which opened in Kerbala in November 2014. This school has the capacity to educate 400 students grades 9 – 12, who are orphans or from less fortunate backgrounds. At present the school is educating 131 female students, 97 of whom are orphans and the remaining 34, from extremely disadvantaged backgrounds. 117 of which are non-sada and 14 of which are sada.   The students spend eight hours at the school each day. Most leave their homes or residences without food for the day. This means they work hard throughout the whole school day, very few ever missing a day, but nearly all, without any food. The girls are passionate about their education and taking charge of their own futures, but without proper nourishment throughout the day, many are becoming weaker and find it hard to concentrate.   Given sufficient nutritious food throughout the day the students will be able to put their full concentration to the school day ahead. The LFCT would like to support the 131 students with coupons to collect food from a restaurant in the same building as the school to provide a guaranteed meal once a day. We need your help to do this.   The LFCT would like to pilot providing coupons for a substantial and nutritionally balanced meal until the end of January. The pilot will last 77 days in total, for 131 girls making the total £6,758 or just £51 per girl.   Just £51.00 could help build the foundations for a future for these girls where they can stand on their own two feet. Many have great dreams and aspirations to attend University and all talk about lifting themselves and their families out of poverty.   After the pilot scheme the LFCT hopes that this project will be self-supporting and self-financing. We plan that the micro-finance project in Lebanon will be able to pair up with the school and sell items of clothing to generate income for the nutrition programme.   For £51.00 can you assist one girl this winter to receive the food to enable her to stay at school and have the chance at a brighter future?   Please help the LFCT to make this pilot scheme a success and become a champion of this project.   Thank you.   Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, Project Manager, Karbala, Iraq  
4th
Jan
2017

Elder brother sacrifices his own education to give his siblings the chance of a brighter future


December 2016
HUsaain Ahmed 
Hussain is thirteen years old and looks up to his older brother, Ali, with great admiration and respect. Without Ali working hard and sacrificing his own education, none of Hussain’s brothers and sisters would be able to continue in education themselves. Hussain’s family rely on Ali to bring in a vital income for the family and he works hard as a daily wage labourer to ensure his family can have adequate nutrition and the family can work to lift themselves out of poverty.
Just last year the family’s lives changed forever when their father passed away after a heart attack in their home in Kerbala. Hussain has three siblings and they now reside with their mother in one rented room. Hussain’s mother had recently started working on the microfinance project, and assisted by the LFCT on the orphan sponsorship programme, Hussain is able to continue in school along with his younger sibling.
A pattern that repeats itself in so many families where a parent is lost in Iraq, is that at least one child will normally drop out of school. Along with Ali, Hussain’s eldest sister, Zainab also left school after her father passed away as the family struggled to pay her transport and costs for attending school.
In the near future, it is hoped all of the siblings will return to education once more. Since the ongoing conflict and warfare in Iraq, child labour is believed to have increased by 15% and it is estimated that up to three million widows are now heading households alone. Children in Iraq have live in a very difficult environment. According to UNICEF in 2015, ‘From the first to the second half of 2015, the number of child victims of grave violations in Iraq shot up by more than five times, from 202 children in the period between January to June, to 1,020 between July and December.’
The LFCT is supporting Iraq’s orphans and widows to find their path to a better future, giving them a helping hand after they find themselves in difficult circumstances.
With your support, children like Hussain and his siblings can stay and even return to school. With an education and opportunities, they can make their own bright futures. Just one extra year of schooling can increase children’s earning ability as adults by up to 10% (Global Partnership for Education, 2016).
Please help to keep our orphan support programme strong and help support other children like Hussain to thrive.
Thank you.
Your generous and continue support means the LFCT can help some of Iraq’s many orphans through their hardship, but more support is still needed. Please donate generously so that the LFCT can continue this life changing project.
Signed by: Alaa Tareq Al Najjar and Sister Israa Razzaq Al Sikafi
1st
Jan
1970

We need your help to enable a much needed Doctor in Gaza to graduate


December 2016
 Student Mohamed Salahat at University 11
Mohammed Nabil El Salahat is a top student achieving 97.8% on his last examination report card. Mohammed is currently in his final year at Al-Azher University in Gaza City studying Medicine. His first year’s fees were paid for from a scholarship due to his high grades under a Ministry of Education initiative. He has taken out loans to cover the rest of his fees but is not eligible for any more. Mohammed’s 11-member family lives in Al Maghazi Refugee Camp which was established in 1948 for Palestinian refugees. The family house is furnished with old furniture and second-hand appliances. His father’s salary stretches only to cover costs for a simple and humble living.
Mohammed’s full course will last for six years and costs a total of 20,700 Jordanian dinars/£23,876. Mohammed lives in a very large family. His father’s income is poor and he is due to retire later this year. Mohammed is not eligible for any further grants this year but as an aspiring doctor in Gaza, it would be a travesty for him not to be able to practice and finish his degree.
This year, Mohammed’s course will cost 2,400 Jordanian dinars/£2,768.00. He is appealing to the LFCT to cover his final course’s fees and enable him to graduate and become a fully qualified Doctor. He will be able to give back to his community and share his passion for medicine. Gaza is one of the places Doctors are the most needed and where aid agencies largely supply hospitals with staff.
Mohammed had to say this about what being a Doctor means to him, “Studying medicine was my dream since I was child. So, I decided to study hard to get a high average in high school that will be enable me to join the faculty of medicine in Al Azhar University in Gaza, Alhamdiullah. My dream will not stop at this point. I want to complete my higher studies and specialize in internal medicine and be a good doctor who serves his country.  I would be very thankful if you can help me in my education fees.”
Mohammed has got so far, let’s help him finish his studies today.
Family data:  
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Nabil Father 59 Teacher (will retire in 2016) $ 550.00
Majeda Mother 55 No occupation $0.00
Ahmed Brother 29 Unemployed $0.00
Eman Sister 28 Married/ Unemployed $0.00
Waad Sister 25 Married/ Unemployed $0.00
Mohammed Applicant 24 University student $0.00
Suad Sister 22 University student $0.00
Amna Sister 20 University student $0.00
Amal Sister 15 High School student $0.00
Ibtihal Sister 14 Elementary School student $0.00
Abdul Rahman Brother 8 Primary school student $0.00

1st
Jan
1970

Situation report: A snapshot from Iraq Dec 2016; “Our homes have become our children’s graves” ~ LFCT Donors Please donate generously


December 2016
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The LFCT has collated some of the latest news information and analysis of the situation in Iraq. It is not designed to be a compressive report but gives an up to date snapshot of some of the challenges faced by the women and children the LFCT supports across the country. December 2016 ——- Amnesty International visit Iraq in December 2016. Below are some extracts form their report.
 “The desperate plight of a generation of children is in the balance as the bloody battle for the city of Mosul threatens to become a humanitarian catastrophe, Amnesty International said today following a field investigation.
On a visit to the region this month, the organization met children of all ages who had suffered terrible injuries after being caught in the line of fire between the armed group calling itself Islamic State (IS) and government forces, who are backed by a US-led coalition.”
 “I met children who have not only sustained horrific wounds but have also seen their relatives and neighbours decapitated in mortar strikes, torn to shreds by car bombs or mine explosions, or crushed under the rubble of their homes,” Donatella Rovera, Senior Crisis Response Advisor at Amnesty International
 “Children caught in the crossfire of the brutal battle for Mosul have seen things that no one, of any age, should ever see. I met children who have not only sustained horrific wounds but have also seen their relatives and neighbours decapitated in mortar strikes, torn to shreds by car bombs or mine explosions, or crushed under the rubble of their homes,” said Donatella Rovera.
 “War-wounded children then find themselves in hospitals overflowing with patients, or in camps for displaced people, where dire humanitarian conditions make their physical and psychological recovery even more difficult. Many others remain trapped in areas where the fighting is raging. There is an urgent need for the Iraqi authorities and their international partners in the battle for Mosul to set up better care, rehabilitation and protection systems for affected civilians. Looking after civilian victims, particularly the most vulnerable, should be an absolute priority – not an afterthought.”
 “Our homes have become our children’s graves”
“In a hospital in Erbil, Amnesty International spoke to Umm Ashraf, who described how she and her seven children were injured when a car bomb exploded outside the house where they were sheltering in east Mosul on 13 December, burying scores of people under the rubble of several houses destroyed in the blast. Her eldest daughter, 17-year-old Shahad, lost both her eyes in the attack.
With few or no functioning or accessible hospitals left in the conflict-affected areas of east Mosul, the epicentre of the fighting, the best hope for the wounded to receive medical care is in Erbil, the capital of the semi-autonomous Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG).
Though it is only 80 kilometres away, getting to Erbil is almost impossible for residents of Mosul. Only the few who manage to get a special permit can enter the KRG, and even then it is difficult or impossible for their relatives to join or visit them.
Some families fleeing the fighting find themselves stuck between frontlines, unable to cross into territory controlled by the KRG and forced to wait in unsafe no-man’s-land areas for days.”
Human Rights Watch, December 2016 Iraq: Armed Groups Using Child Soldiers – Armed Groups Should Immediately Demobilize Children
“Armed groups in Iraq affiliated to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party have recruited boys and girls, Human Rights Watch said today. In two cases the armed groups abducted or seriously abused children who tried to leave their forces. The groups should urgently demobilize children, investigate abuses, pledge to end child recruitment, and appropriately penalize commanders who fail to do so.
Human Rights Watch documented 29 cases in northern Iraq in which Kurdish and Yezidi children were recruited by two armed groups, the People’s Defence Forces (Hêzên Parastina Gel, or HPG) and the Shingal Resistance Units (Yekîneyên Berxwedana Şingal, or YBŞ). The HPG is the armed wing of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, which is known by its initials, the PKK (Partiya Karkerên Kurdistanê). The YBŞ, a militia from the Yezidi religious community, is also affiliated with the PKK.
Children under age 15 affiliated with both groups told Human Rights Watch that they have participated in fighting, while others said they had staffed checkpoints or cleaned and prepared weapons. Even if the armed groups do not send children into direct combat, they place them at risk by training them in areas that Turkey has attacked with airstrikes in its conflict with the PKK, such as Iraq’s Qandil mountain area.
The recruitment or use of children under 15 is a war crime. Under international law, non-state armed groups like the HPG and YBŞ must not, under any circumstances, recruit children under 18, or use them in hostilities. Recruitment of children by armed groups is prohibited by international law, even if the children “volunteer.”
The HPG should investigate and hold accountable those responsible for abducting or otherwise abusing children, and the Iraqi government in Baghdad, which has paid salaries to YBŞ forces, should pressure the group to demobilize all child soldiers, Human Rights Watch said.
The HPG, along with other Kurdish armed groups broadly aligned with the PKK, operates in Turkey, Syria, and Iraq, and is fighting Turkish and non-state armed groups including the Islamic State (also known as ISIS). The PKK-aligned groups have trained and supported the YBŞ, which gained recruits after the HPG helped Yezidis flee ISIS massacres of Yezidi civilians in Sinjar in August 2014.”
Family survived under Isis for Two years by pretending to be Sunni The Guardian, December 2016
 “The family of Ali Amin Abdullah make unlikely Islamic State supporters – not least because they are from the Shia sect, despised and persecuted by the jihadi militants. In order to survive for two years under the self-proclaimed caliphate in Mosul, however, they did what it took to avoid persecution and likely death at the hands of Isis fighters: they pretended to be Sunni.
For Abdullah, who was repeatedly threatened by gun-wielding militants who were suspicious about his true denomination, this meant more than just words: he signed on for classes at a local Isis-linked religious institute. But his subterfuge proved so successful that, when newly arrived Iraqi government troops came to the family’s home in early November, they accused him and his relatives of collaboration.
 “When I opened the door, a soldier said: ‘He is Daesh,’ and detained me and then took my brother, Abbas, too and asked about my father,” said Mustafa Ali, one of Abdullah’s sons, using a common Arabic acronym for the group. His father shouted: “I am not Daesh,” but the three men were taken to a nearby base.
Though his sons were eventually freed, Abdullah was taken away. His family, who insist there is no evidence he ever supported Isis, much less took up arms, have had no news since of what charges he might face. Their anger is growing by the day, the initial joy of freedom inspired by the anticipated removal of Isis from Mosul transmuted into fear.
“If my father was Daesh,” said Ali, “he would be fighting the army in the battlefield, not sitting in his house waiting to be detained by the army.”
Hailing from the tight-knit Shabak minority, which has lived for generations in the Nineveh plains, a traditional haven of diversity, the family thought they had become inured to bloodshed after surviving the descent into vicious sectarianism that followed the US-led invasion in 2003.
So despite grim reports of life under Isis rule, most decided to risk staying on rather than flee to an overcrowded, underfunded refugee camp, relying on passing as Sunni Shabaks. But then Isis arrived, and Ali realised nothing had prepared him for its twisted dedication to murder and cruelty, the markets full of Yazidi women sold to be raped, or the vicious, bizarre executions on trumped-up or trivial charges. “We have seen too many beheadings, people being drowned in cages, thrown from the top of buildings,” he said. “I myself saw a man thrown off a building near the governor’s office around three months ago. I couldn’t sleep for a week afterwards.”
In the first days after the militants swept into town in 2014, his family feared they had made a terrible mistake, after Abdullah was arrested twice and threatened at gunpoint by militants convinced that the family were Shias. “They placed a gun on my father’s head four times but he insisted that he was a Sunni,” Ali said. Increasingly fearful for his family after his second brush with Isis, Abdullah decided to sign up for a sharia law course in a school linked to the group.
He hoped the relatively innocuous cover of extreme devotion would provide some protection if attacks escalated. And when Isis came to arrest him for the third time at the end of 2014, it was the head of the sharia school, Sheikh Hammadi, who secured his release by vouching for his Sunni credentials.
Even Hammadi’s word could not put suspicions to rest, and Isis rounded him up again in 2015. By then his protector had been killed in a US airstrike, but his fellow students came to the rescue instead. He could not be Shia if he was studying Sunni texts in an Isis school, they argued.
The head of the local neighbourhood committee, who stayed through Isis rule, confirmed key details of the family’s story to the Guardian. “I can tell you with certainty that the family of Ali Amin [Abdullah] is Shia,” said Mohammad Sulayman Yunis, 65.
 “Isis forced him to study sharia because they suspected him of being Shia, and he would have been killed if they proved he was Shia. They destroyed many Shia houses in Gogjali[a neighbourhood in Mosul]. I was there and saw it myself.”
Ali, a tall, inquisitive man, was well aware of the threat.
When the Guardian first contacted him through two intermediaries to ask about life in Mosul, Ali agreed to speak about the Isis horrors he was witnessing as the Iraqi battle to reclaim the city began – even though possession of a sim card could mean a death penalty.
Most nights in October he would walk up to the roof of his cement block house, look around for informers who might be tempted to turn him in, then slide under a blanket and take out his phone.
“All we need to do is to get rid of this threat. We will not need anything after that. Mosul has become a prison,” Ali whispered into the handset one night. Sometimes he was with his brother-in-law, who had been whipped by Isis for keeping his beard too short and for smoking.
The city became even more dangerous as the fighting closed in and Isis seized civilians to serve as human shields. Food ran low but people stayed home and went hungry, hoping to be spared. “No one knows where the next mortar will hit,” said Ali, who used to drive a truck before Isis came and cut off most trade along with his livelihood.
Weeks after the launch of the offensive to oust Isis, there was a glimmer of hope, as the militants began retreating. “I was in Mosul market yesterday for an hour; people are busy collecting food stores. I did not see any Hasba [morality police] in the market. We were around 15 people who did not go to pray and no one told us to go,” he told the Guardian at the time.
When government soldiers arrived in their corner of the eastern suburbs of Mosul on 2 November, Ali thought freedom was in sight. The nightmare of life under Isis, he thought, could be drawing to a close. But it was then that the cover that had kept their family alive – the pretence of being Sunni – turned into a liability and soldiers took Ali, Abbas and Abdullah away.
The family finally fled Mosul on 13 November, deciding in the unbearable calculus of war that the risks of the road were less than the risks of staying under attack. They could do more for their father alive than dead, they decided, and were told he had been moved to the capital.
“They have taken my father to Baghdad and we don’t know what has happened to him. He is innocent,” Ali said, before leaving for the capital to look for him. There is no more news on where Abdullah is being held, but Ali has vowed to keep searching as long as he can afford to.
His Facebook page is filled with the search. One picture shows Ali’s toddler son holding a mobile phone to his ear, above the caption: “He is waiting for you to return.” Another simply shows a young man screaming into the sky. “Oh Allah, I am tired, please return my father.”
In Guardian stories previously quoting Ali, he was given the pseudonym Abu Mohammed and his name was altered. This was to protect him given Isis penalties for owning a mobile phone and criticising the group’s rule.”
Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, LFCT Project Manager, Karbala
1st
Jan
1970

As the New Year dawns a young cancer patient needs your help to live out her dreams.


January 2017
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Habiba Basraee is nine years old and has been diagnosed with cancer. Living in Iraq, in the Mudaraa District, in the City of Karbala, her parents have struggled to get an efficient diagnosis and find suitable treatment.
Her cancer, which is a tumour located in her eye, was first misdiagnosed and regarded as a mucus sack. However, upon further MRI scans, it was diagnosed that there was a tumour present in the tear sac of her right eye. The family and doctors were still unsure if the tumour was cancerous. At this point the family decided to go to Lebanon due to poor diagnosis and services in Iraq. There it was established the tumour was cancerous and must be removed immediately. Habiba Basraee underwent surgery, which was a success. After surgery, and the removal of the tumour, further tests indicated that the cancer was in fact Rhabdomyosarcoma in its embryonic stage. This was not the news the family were hoping for, but with treatment, Habiba Basraee’s prognosis is positive. Habiba Basraee has been advised by her oncology doctor to have 42 weeks of chemotherapy treatment.
The total costs of this treatment will be $ 100,000.00 /£ 80,991.30. For any family, this is a huge sum of money however for Habiba Basraee’s family who have already sacrificed a great deal and exhausted their small family savings to relocate to Lebanon, this sum of money stands between Habiba Basraee and a normal, happy and healthy future.
Habiba Basraee’s father is the family’s only breadwinner, bringing in approximately US$ 1,000.00 / GB£ 800.00 per month. The family have little spare income at the end of the month and they are determined to keep all of their children in education to give them the best possible future. It would take the family over 12 and a half years to pay for Tabarak’s treatment using all of her father’s income alone.
The family are greatly distressed but determined that Habiba Basraee survives and carries on life as a happy, healthy child and is able to live out her dreams – something all parents desire for their children. Habiba Basraee is just a normal, happy nine year old who loves school, spending time with her family and playing with her friends.
The family are seeking funding towards Habiba Basraee’s treatment  –  any amount will go a huge way in assisting.
Dear LFCT donors, we are appealing to you for support for young Habiba Basraee and to invest in her future. No child should ever have to suffer as Habiba Basraee is, and no parents see their child suffering.
As the New Year dawns, please help us help Habiba Basraee live out her dreams and assist her with vital lifesaving treatment.
6th
Jan
2017

Appeal: The Power of Education is Clear


January 2017 
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The Development and Relief Foundation (DRF) is a charitable foundation, established in 2005 in KarbalA, Iraq. DRF was founded by Ayatoullah Sayed Murtadha Al-Qizwini.
Ayatoullah Sayed Al-Qizwini aimed to provide assistance to the oppressed Iraqi people especially in Karbala town, the town of Al-Imam Al-Hussein a.s.. He noticed that Karbala town didn’t have any school or hospital to provide the assistance to widows and orphans that he saw rising numbers of each month that passed.
Ayatoullah Sayed Al-Qizwini established the DRF and begun providing humanitarian and financial assistance for widows and their orphans. Karbala town became a shelter for orphans, displaced and refuges from other Iraqi governorate who lost their fathers during the wars or in the aftermath. The charity started providing food, financial assistance and clothing.
Since 2005 DRF has implemented the following:
  1. Imam Jafar Al-Sadiq mixed Primary School for orphans (Declared the BEST Primary School in Karbala Governate for 2016)
  2. Al-Salihat High School for Girls (Declared the BEST Secondary School in Karbala Governate for 2016)
  3. Imam Al-Hujah Hospital
The Imam Jafar Al-Sadiq primary school was founded to serve orphans. It currently has 360 pupils.
For these pupils, this education means they will have a brighter future and can realise their dreams. Through their own hard work, supported by the school, pupils are given the best start possible. Many have faced great adversity and witnessed terrible events, yet they remain determined to study and try their hardest.
If all students in low-income countries left school with basic reading skills, 171 million people could be lifted out of poverty. This is equal to a 12% cut in global poverty. Furthermore, for girls, one additional school year can increase a woman’s earnings by 10% to 20% (Global Partnership for Education, 2016.
The power of education is clear
The school is appealing for any financial assistance towards its particular costs. Below is a detailed breakdown of the school’s costs which total GB£ 955.00 per year per pupil. This equates to GB£ 79.60 per month.
Yearly the school spends approximately GB£ 955.00 on each pupil, which is distributed across the following:
– Nine buses used to transport the pupils and teaching stuff from and to their residence. The transport is free but the foundation has the responsibility of repairing the buses and filling them with fuel costing approximately GB£ 1,300.00 per year.
– Books, bags and stationary to enable students to study. This costs approximately GB£ 2,315..00. In addition, the science laboratory equipment costs GB£ 2,300.00 per year.
– A healthy breakfast is essential for children’s nourishment and success in their studies. This costs approximately GB£ 12,915.00 per annum. In addition, the school keeps some sheep to feed the orphans costing GB£ 810.00 per year including their upkeep. – Throughout the year the school provides financial stipends in times of particular hardship, toys and clothing to celebrate holidays. Although some of these are donated by visitors to the school, the cost to the school is GB£ 2,503.00
– The cost of school uniform for all pupils totals GB£ 3,372.00 per annum.
– During the Holy Ramadan month the school sets up a banquet breakfast to break the fast every week during Ramadan GB£ 16,350.00 per year. That is less than £1.50 per head per day.
– Each pupil in school receives monthly financial support of GB£ 34.00 providing vital support to keep them in school, such as food, medical supplies and clothing. This means they don’t have to go out to work and can focus on their futures.
The administration and teaching staff costs total £121,345 yearly.
The school also provides a large generator to provide the classrooms with electric power every day alongside its heating and cooling fans. Yearly this totals GB£ 2,832.00
If you can help a child in Iraq to lift themselves and their family out of poverty through the power of education, you may choose any element of the project to support. With a hand up and the children’s own hard work, currently 360 children are on the path towards a brighter future.
16th
Jan
2017

Two cows and Ten sheep will allow widows, whose husbands were killed by ISIS, and families in Babylon, Iraq to take charge of their futures


January 2017
2 1
Imam Muhammad al-Baqie (as) encouraged and motivated all to see livelihood and increase of wealth though right means. He has said: “Investment of capital in order to seek income is a part of manliness and bravery.” He endeavoured to the extent to fulfil the needs of Muslims and filling vacuum in their lives and preferred it over to the most recommended worship which is recommended Hajj Pilgrimage. Imam Muhammad al-Baqir (as) has said:
“If I go for one recommended Hajj Pilgrimage, instead it is more desirable for me to free seventy slaves. But if I could rescue a Muslim family from hardship, change their hungriness into fullness, cover them and protect their dignity near people – this task for me is more desirable then performing Hajj Pilgrimage for seventy times.”
The LFCT continues its assistance to 19 families that fled from Mosul. Seven men across the families were brutally attacked and murdered by so called ISIS. Over half of the families are now made up of just widows and their orphans. They fled and were assisted by a popular mobilisation who protected them and sent them to Babylon to safety. There are currently 18 families residing in a small settlement. To date the LFCT has provide access to water, along with the Government support, bathrooms, clothing and medical assistance.
The LFCT firmly believes that people can stand on their own two feet with a hand up. The LFCT is responding from an appeal from some of the families for a hand up to help them generate their own incomes and lift themselves out of poverty.
Prior to their forced resettlement, many of the families were shepherds. As such, they have gathered a wealth of experience in rearing sheep and best practice. The families have showed an interest in continuing this work in their new settlement. The families will be split into two groups, with five families in each. One person will act as a Chair and will be guided by an LFCT partner. Within the committees, different roles will be established and assigned including bookkeeping and animal welfare. Ten families have shown an interest in the project although all have been given the opportunity. Each group will be provided with one cow and five sheep. A contract will be drawn up, with co-chosen and opted rules and regulations to ensure everyone in the group benefits accordingly from the project. For example, once the sheep start reproducing, (sheep reproduce up to twice a year, meaning the flock will rapidly multiply) the group might decide to sell a sheep depending on the groups needs. Alternatively, they might decide to utilise some of the cow’s dairy products for their own families. Depending to the number of individuals in each family, the produce and income will be split up accordingly on a per person basis.
The aim of the project is to provide the families with the tools to become self-sufficient. Both the cows and sheep will provide produce for the families own nutrition and a source of income when produce is sold. In addition, the sheep will provide offspring and the manure from the cow can be used to nourish the soil and grow vegetables in a garden.
The estimate cost is as follows:
  • The cow: 1.500.000 IQD/£1,050.00 each (the required number of cows is two)
  • The sheep: 250.000 IQD/ £ 173.50 each (the required numbers of sheep is 10)
The total cost is estimated to be £ 3,835.00
As with all projects, the LFCT will monitor this project closely and receive regular reports from the partner on the ground. This project, along with the families own hard work, has the potential to see families thrive. Earning one’s own income will bring increased levels of household wealth which will have a positive knock on effect on health, education and community development. Families will see a raise in their confidence, self-worth and dignity as once more they are able to put their Shepherding knowledge into practice and take charge of their own futures.
LFCT Donors PLEASE Donate generously
Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, LFCT Project Manager, Karbala
23rd
Jan
2017

Helping whole communities to live healthier lives – supporting a dedicated nursing student in Pemba Island, Tanzania


January 2017
WA    
Family data:
 
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income per month Income per month
Kai Kombo Omar Father 47 Farmer TZS 20,000.00 £7.05
Ashura Kombo Juma Mother 43 Housewife 0.00 0.00
Bimkubwa Kai Kombo Applicant 21 Student 0.00 0.00
Maryam Kai Kombo Sibling 23 Housewife 0.00 0.00
Kassim Kai Kombo Sibling 19 Student 0.00 0.00
IL – Ham Kai Kombo Sibling 16 Student 0.00 0.00
Shemsa Kai Kombo Sibling 14 Student 0.00 0.00
Mwamkuu Kai Chande Grandmother 65 Unemployed 0.00 0.00
Amina Kombo Omar Aunt 44 Unemployed 0.00 0.00
 
Bimkubwa Kai Kombo, aged 21, lives with his family in Muharitani Chake in Pemba, Tanzania. He has one elder sibling and four younger. Bimkubwa is studying Nursing at University College Zanzibar. He begun studying in October 2016. He is entering her second semester of the course and has six semesters in total. The total cost for the six semesters will be 5,293,500.00 Tshs/ £1,912.00 To date, Bimkubwa has not been able to pay any of the course fees. He is now entering the deadline for course fee payment and has no way of paying the fees. If he misses the deadline he will lose his place on the course.  
Bimkubwa is a talented student who achieved an average of 85.2 per cent on his last report car. After studying for three years, Bamkubwa will become a fully qualified nurse. In 2013 the World Health Organisation has stated that Tanzania has an acute shortage of nurses across the country with approximately 33,000 trained professionals in the country to serve a population of 49 million.  
Once trained, Bimkubwa will add to the great need for nurses, providing vital healthcare and playing a key role in his country’s development. Unfortunately, the future is still uncertain, particularly as the deadline for fee payment draws closer. Bimkubwa’s family can ill afford the fees and Bimkubwa was sure he would be awarded a scholarship or gain support from local trusts. Bimkubwa has had no such luck and is devastated at the prospect of having to drop out from the course. He is determined to finish his studies and support his country’s healthcare system. He is appealing to the LFCT for the course fees and will support himself with living costs.
Please help the LFCT to support a dedicated nursing student today. By helping Bimkubwa to study you will be helping whole communities to live healthier and longer lives as Bimkubwa becomes an important player in Tanzania’s healthcare system.  
Thank you.
Signed by: Mr Hameed Y Sheriff, Arusha, LFCT’s Tanzania Volunteer
1st
Jan
1970

Aspiring teacher needs your assistance to inspire future generations in Zanzibar, Tanzania


January 2017
WA2
Family data:
 
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income Income per month
Mohammed Suleiman Salum Father 64 Farmer TZS 45,000.00 £15.85
Zuhura Rashid Said Mother 55 Farmer TZS 25,000.00 £8.80
Fahad Mohammed Suleiman Applicant 24 Student TZS 0.00 £0.00
Khamis Mohamed Suleiman Sibling 25 Student TZS 0.00 £0.00
Said Rashid Said Sibling 38 Farmer TZS 17,000.00 £6.00
Khairat Mohammed Suleiman Sibling 22 Student TZS 0.00 £0.00
Khairat Mohammed Salum Sibling 25 Student TZS 0.00 £0.00
Saumu Mohammed Said Grandmother 82 Housewife TZS 0.00 £0.00
Maryam Suleiman Salum Aunt 67 Housewife TZS 0.00 £0.00
 
Fahad Mohammed Suleiman, 24, resides in Elezo, Darajabouvu, Pemba, Tanzania. He is a student of Science and Education at the College of The State University of Zanzibar (SUZA). Fahad finished school with a good Diploma and was offered a place at SUZA. Fahad’s course will last for three years at a total cost of 4,500,000 Tshs/ £1,625.00
Fahad was delighted to hear he had been awarded a place at SUZA and applied to a loan of Feda via the Board Credit for Higher Education but unfortunately he was refused. Fahad applied for the loan knowing his family could not afford the fees, due to the poor wage of farmers, his family earn little more than covers their basic living. This is approximately 100 times his father’s monthly income. The fees are just one costs associated with the study and Fahad will also need to support his own living and educational supplies whilst at SUZA.
At present, Fahad has started on his course but is due to pay the first semester’s fees soon. At present he has no means to pay. He has appealed to the LFCT to help fund his studies. He has contacting many other organisations but with no success.
For Fahad, studying at University will enable him to become a teacher of Science. He will earn nearly ten times he would as a farmer – the other option that he is likely to follow should he have to finish his studies due to financial pressures. He will be able to assist his family and his younger siblings are more likely to continue in education. For Fahad, the chance to study at University will determine the course of future.
Please help to assist Fahad to complete his degree today and inspire future generations.
Thank you.
Signed by: Mr Hameed Y Sheriff, Arusha, LFCT’s Tanzania Volunteer
30th
Jan
2017

‘Appeal: Sheets are our only shelter from the wind’.


January 2017
30-1-17 india housing 2appeal-sheets
Several decades ago in Bihar, India, Fatima Khatoon’s Saddah family hit a financial crisis. One of several daughters, her father was struggling to support his family. For his daughters that were old enough, he arranged marriages for them. This included Fatima. Soon into her own marriage, Fatima’s new husband began to suffer from a range of long term health conditions which has led to him grow increasingly weak and unable to work. Fatima has stood by her husband and now finds herself in a very similar position to her family before her father arranged the marriage. Fatima and her husband have had seven children. They are primarily supported by their one son who did not complete formal schooling and works as an auto rickshaw driver. Their son works very hard and his income is supplemented by some paid domestic work that Fatima and her other children perform, however their lack of access to opportunities and education means their earning power is low and the family can afford daily food but little else.
A limited income means the family were living on the streets until a neighbour in the area kindly offered the space of their veranda for the family to live on. The family have been living on the veranda, out in the open with sheets to offer some shelter from the wind. They have no access to a toilet or bathing facilities and cook food on a stove in the yard. Despite working hard, low incomes and high living costs in India mean the family cannot afford to rent living space. The family feel trapped in a cycle, one that is worsening health conditions and increasing the likelihood that the youngest siblings will soon drop out of school and seek work.
An LFCT supporter came to know about the family and has risen their case. With a helping hand the family will be able to support themselves. However, they need the seeds to sow this success – starting with a simple dwelling to shelter from the open and space to live in dignity and call their own.
The LFCT needs your help to give this family the best chance – particularly for the two youngest children who are still in school. With the purchase of land and the construction of a simple house with a kitchen and bathroom, this family can begin to help themselves.
The estimated cost of the construction is INR 800-850,000/£9,360 – 9,945. This is a much more sustainable option that renting and will provide long term security. Please help to assist this Saddah Sister and her family today. We look forward to updating you with their progress.
Family information:
  1. Husband – sick and does not work
  2. Our sister – wife – serves as domestic servant in the village
  3. Eldest daughter – married and is outside of village
  4. Son – auto rickshaw driver and earning member, not educated
  5. Daughter – married and is outside of village
  6. Son – works as domestic servant, not educated
  7. Son – serves another Shia family in Mumbai
  8. Daughter – in her teens, stays with the family
  9. Son – studying in class I, stays with the family

Cost:
  1. Land cost – 40’ x 22’ feet INR 200,000.00 (Land price is INR 150-160,000.00 + INR 25-30,000.00 Land Registry cost app)
  2. Construction cost – @ 1000 / Sq Feet – INR 650,000.00 (app)

Total appeal – INR 850,000.00 / GB£ 10,008.23
LFCT Donors and supporter, please donate generously
16th
Feb
2017

Pharmacy student in Gaza seeks assistance to turn fortunes around


February 2017
16650363_1413093208724434_646326705_n
Shouroq Aynam Al Qedra, aged 19, is a resident of the Gaza strip in Khan Younis, Palestine. Living in one of the most persecuted and repressed regions on earth, Shouroq’s chances in life have been stifled. A poor economy and oppressing restrictions on Gaza mean job opportunities are limited. Shouroq’s parents do not work and the family rely on minimal assistance from the Ministry of Social Affairs.
For Shouroq, a bright student with a strong academic record, she has the opportunity to turn her family’s fortunes around. She has been offered a place at Al Azhar University on a Pharmacy course. Shouroq has enrolled and started on the course. For as long as she can remember she has wanted to study to become a Pharmacist. There is a distinct lack of trained medical care practitioners in Gaza and Shouroq can’t wait to finish her course and give back to her community.
For Shouroq, however, looking forward to this and putting all of her time and energy into her course is tainted by an overarching worry. Shouroq doesn’t know how she will pay for the fees for her course. The course duration is five years, at JD 650.00 / GB£735.00 per semester.
For Shouroq’s family without any form of income other than Ministry assistance, the fees for the course are an impossible cost to cover. Shouroq’s family want to very best for her and know that given the chance, she can fulfil a vital role in Palestinian society.
Shouroq is appealing for assistance with her University fees for the duration of her course. Please help Shouroq help her community and make a generous donation towards her University fees.
Thank you.
Family information:
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Ayman Al Qedra Father 50 Unemployed No income
Hanal Firwana Mother 43 House Wife No income
Sourouq Al Qedra Applicant 19   £0.00
Younis Al Qedra Sibling 25 Unemployed No income
Mohammed Sibling 23 Unemployed No income
Ahmed Sibling 9 Student £0.00
Doan Sibling 22 No income
Younis Grandfather Unemployed No income
Zinab Grandmother
Fareeda Aunt
Hanna Sibling 16 Student £0.00

8th
Mar
2017

Family saved for twenty years for a better future and all was destroyed in a matter of hours


March 2017

Cost of House finishing building of house
Plastering $400.00
Tiles and Installing Tiles $2,000.00
Painting $800.00
Doors $1,600.00
Kitchen and Washroom $1,200.00
Total Cost $6,000.00
Zubayda Najdi lives in Nabatieh District, Lebanon. Until recently she lived with her husband and four children in small house that belongs to their in laws. The house was cramped and they lived like this for twenty years. They are currently renting a small house nearby. Zubayda and her family have spent twenty years saving to build their own home and business. In 2006 they borrowed some money to open a mini market and start building a home. They thought hard about the items they would include in the market to bring customers from far and wide including a frisco juice drink machine, espresso machine and popcorn machine in addition to snacks and daily household items. They started building their home with their life’s saving and a loan when the mini market became profitable. However, soon after opening the mini market it got completely destroyed. The family plead for compensation but have not received a single penny. As the family took out a loan to pay for the mini market, and with no compensation awarded, they continued to owe payments on the loan without any income coming in. Their three sons had to stop their education, completing only to the 9th grade. Their daughter Fatima is in the 8th grade and the family are struggling to keep her in school but hope she can continue at least to the 9th grade. After struggling to overcome the loss of their mini market, the family decided to open an internet café and rent some space to do this from. They wanted a fresh start. They opened a café offering internet access and homemade pies and refreshments. Unfortunately the café was not very prosperous and again the family fell into more debt as they took out a loan to start the business. Their situation now is that the whole family, apart from Fatima, are working to try and keep Fatima in school, pay their debts back and pay for rent so that they have somewhere to live. The family are slowly getting back on their feet but still have a half built house and need to keep paying rent and debts. The family have appealed to the LFCT to provide a non-interest loan so that they can continue building their home, move in and save on rent costs. Once they have moved into their home they will save on rent and can get back on their feet. Banks will not lend to them anymore because of the unfortunate circumstances of their first loan on the mini market that were destroyed. They are trapped in a cycle of paying back high interest previous loans. With assistance from the LFCT they will be able to break this cycle and get themselves back into financial security and importantly, keep young Fatima in school. Signed by: Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Managing Trustees, Manessa Association34
1st
Jan
1970

Terrible accidental fire leaves family distraught – Six year old Ruqaia needs your help for a quick recovery


March 2017

Ruqaia Maitham Ali is like any other six year old girl. She enjoys playing and reading and her parents look forward to a bright future for her. However since last October, each day is a little more difficult for Ruqaia and her family. Last Ashura when her family were cooking in their home in dedication to Imam Hussain (a.s) Ruqaia was involved in a terrible accident when the gasoline her mother was cooking with leaked and their home caught fire. Little Ruqaia was engulfed by the flames suffering severe burns, especially to her face. Ruqaia was rushed to hospital delirious with pain. Her parents were distraught and after some initial treatment for the burns was allowed home. Ruqaia now struggled to breathe and will need several surgeries over the coming months and years. The cost of her surgery has kindly been covered so far by Dr Alaa AlJurani but future treatments might incur further costs for the family. Each month Ruqaia’s skin ointment and bandages cost approximately $100 – 150. For Ruqaia’s family the cost of this ongoing treatment is bringing great financial strain. Her father is a volunteer with AlHashid Al Shabi in Mosul and his honorarium is only enough to cover their basic living. In addition, the family home has been partially destroyed. The family will unlikely be able to cover the repair of their home but for now their immediate concern is paying for Ruqaia’s treatment. The family’s living condition was poor before the fire and they cannot risk any infection to Ruqaia’s burns. The healthcare professionals treating Ruqaia have suggested that she will increase her chance of recovery if she is to have a clean mattress and bedding and loose clothing for her wounds.
No. Item Description Quantity Unit Price IQD Total IQD GB£
1 Colored shoes 1 9,250.00 9,250.00 £6.30
2 White shoes 1 1,250.00 11,250.00 £7.65
3 Girl’s Pajama 1 11,250.00 11,250.00 £7.65
4 Pant 1 8,500.00 8,500.00 £5.80
5 Socks 3 2,000.00 6,000.00 £4.10
6 Pillow 1 11,750.00 11,750.00 £8.00
7 Blanket Cotton 3 16,250.00 48,750.00 £33.20
8 Blanket 2 20,500.00 41,000.00 £27.90
9 Set of covers for the pillow 1 6,000.00 6,000.00 £4.10
10 Inner clothes sets 5 13,000.00 65,000.00 £44.25
11 Pant jeans 1 15,250.00 15,250.00 £10.40
12 Pajama kids set 3 16,750.00 50,250.00 £34.20
13 Girl under wear 2 750.00 1,500.00 £1.05
14 Body towel 1 7,250.00 7,250.00 £4.95
15 Face towel 1 1,250.00 1,250.00 £0.85
16 Jeans shirt 1 15,000.00 15,000.00 £10.20
17 Toy for girl 1 10,000.00 10,000.00 £6.80
18 Pink cubes toy bag 1 4,500.00 4,500.00 £3.05
19 Colored cub 1 2,500.00 2,500.00 £1.70
20 Teeth brush 2 1,000.00 2,000.00 £1.35
21 Dettol Soap for washing 2 750.00 1,500.00 £1.05
22 Liquid Soap for hand washing 2 750.00 1,500.00 £1.05
23 Set Cleaning tools 1 5,000.00 5,000.00 £3.40
24 Kitchen tissues FINE 1 1,500.00 1,500.00 £1.05
25 T-Shirt model 1 5,000.00 5,000.00 £3.40
26 Set for combs 1 1,000.00 1,000.00 £0.70
27 Colored Bear 1 2,000.00 2,000.00 £1.40
28 Wet tissues 1 1,250.00 1,250.00 £0.85
29 Hand wet liquid 1 3,750.00 3,750.00 £2.55
30 Gloves 1 750.00 750.00 £0.50
31 Socks white color 1 1,250.00 1,250.00 £0.85
32 Hair colored 1 750.00 750.00 £0.50
33 Hair Aqras with butterflies 1 1,000.00 1,000.00 £0.70
34 Hair Aqras white 1 750.00 750.00 £0.50
35 Ear stick 1 500.00 500.00 £0.35
36 Path cleaning brush 1 1,000.00 1,000.00 £0.70
37 Trash bin 1 1,500.00 1,500.00 £1.05
38 Bed blue color 1 145,000.00 145,000.00 £98.70
39 Mattress 1 70,000.00 70,000.00 £47.65
40 Locker 1 75,000.00 75,000.00 £51.05
TOTAL 648,250.00 £441.50

With this simple yet life changing support, Ruqaia will likely make a much quicker recovery and be able to get back to being a healthy and happy six year old.
Please consider a generous donation. Thank you.
Signed by: Mr Alaa Tareq Al Najjar, LFCT’s Volunteer, Karbala, Iraq  
9th
Mar
2017

Mohammed Majed Deeb is a student of medicine. But the odds are stacked against him as a student living under repression in the Gaza strip.


March 2017

Mohammed finished high school with top grades and took the offer of a place at Al Azhar University to study medicine and become a Doctor. Mohammed took the place and has funded his first semester through savings. He is now entering his second semester and after he was unable to secure scope from the University to pay in arrears, risks losing his place and Gaza risks losing a potential vital medical professional.
The payments for his current semester are now urgent for Mohammed as he has an exam this month and must pay his fees in order to continue his degree. Living in the Gaza strip, wages are low and Mohammed’s family is large. Mohammed’s father is a teacher and earns enough to pay for the family’s living costs but there is nothing left over at the end of the month.
Family data:
Name Relation to applicant Age Occupation Income
Majed Father 53 Teacher Very low
Sohaila Mother 51 Unemplyed $0.00
 Mohammed Applicant 21 University Student $0.00
Nedal Sibling 28 Unemplyed $0.00
Ahmed Sibling 26 Unemplyed $0.00
Inas Sibling 25 Unemplyed $0.00
Tamer Sibling 19 University Student $0.00
Hekmat Grandmother 77 Retired $0.00

In 2014 the family’s home was destroyed during missile and rocket launch and ever since the family have taken loans from relatives to rebuild their home. Mohammed has nowhere else to turn to pay his fees and has asked the LFCT to support him in becoming a qualified Doctor.
Mohammed says, “I chose studding medicine because in the Gaza Strip where I live, people suffer a lot due to unavailability of qualified health care professionals, particularly doctors, which cause deaths at the time where if we had good doctors many lives would have been saved.  As stated above, I see myself in the future Insha Allah as a good doctor who will do his best to help people live healthy and protected.”
Mohammed will support his living but is appealing to the LFCT for $1,795 USD per semester for the fees, over a total of six semesters.
Mohammed will only be able to complete his studies and become a qualified Doctor with your support. There are very few places in the world where Doctors are so badly needed as the Gaza strip. Let us help Mohammed and the people of the Gaza strip today with a vital Doctor ready to serve his community.
13th
Mar
2017

Can you help put an end to this village’s water crisis? Appeal from residents of Pemba


March 2017

Chanoni village is situated in the Shehia Trim, Chake District – Chake, Pemba South Region. Inside the village there is a distinct lack of safe drinking water. Previously a UNICEF facilitated well along with an individual sponsored well provided enough water for the village. These wells were drilled in the upper part of the village meaning people could access water easily, without having to climb down the mountainside. Unfortunately the well dug by UNICEF has dried up completely and the individual donors well does not provide sufficient water. There is a great scarcity in the village. Some days the water flows but others it is little more than a trickle. There simply isn’t enough to meet demand. The villages are now fetching water from a well drilled by a lady in the valley. Villagers whose houses are atop the hill need to make a perilous journey down and then back up each time they need to fetch water supplies. This well is inadequate in fulfilling demands and being located in the valley, the well often becomes contaminated with animal excrement. The worry of where the next glass of water will come from occupies residents minds and takes away precious time – a resource that could otherwise be used to generate income and help people to live with more security. The villagers are in great need of water and have appealed to the LFCT to provide some provisions to bring water to their village. They cannot afford to install a scheme themselves unlike other wealthier villages in the area.
No ITERM UNITY QUANTITY UNITY COST TOTAL COST TOTAL GB£
1 Polthyne Pipe HDPE class C 2” Rolls 15 TZS 900,000.00 TZS 13,500,000.00 £4,871.80
2 Polthyne Pipe HDPE class C 1” Rolls 8 TZS 320,000.00 TZS 2,560,000.00 £923.84
3 Gate valve 2’’ Pc 1 TZS 70,000.00 TZS 70,000.00 £25.26
4 Gate valve ¾ ‘’ Pcs 10 TZS 18,000.00 TZS 180,000.00 £64.96
5 IPS Pipe ¾ ‘’ Pcs 8 TZS 32,000.00 TZS 256,000.00 £92.38
6 IPS Elbow ¾ Pcs 32 TZS 4,500.00 TZS 144,000.00 £51.98
7 Bib Tape Pcs 10 TZS 12,500.00 TZS 125,000.00 £45.11
8 Tee connector 1’’ x 1 Pcs 8 TZS 6,000.00 TZS 48,000.00 £17.32
9 Tee connector 1’’ x ¾ ‘’ Pcs 12 TZS 4,500.00 TZS 54,000.00 £19.49
10 Reducing connector Pcs 2 TZS 20,000.00 TZS 40,000.00 £14.44
11 Bush Pcs 20 TZS 3,500.00 TZS 70,000.00 £25.62
12 Socket 2‘’ Pcs 8 TZS 6,000.00 TZS 48,000.00 £17.33
13 Socket 1’’ Pcs 10 TZS 3,500.00 TZS 35,000.00 £12.64
14 Nipple ¾ Pcs 10 TZS 2,000.00 TZS 20,000.00 £7.22
15 Socket ¾ ‘’ Pcs 12 TZS 2,500.00 TZS 30,000.00 £10.83
16 Main   connector 2’’ Pcs 8 TZS 8,000.00 TZS 64,000.00 £23.10
17 Main connector 1’’ Pcs 15 TZS 5,000.00 TZS 75,000.00 £27.07
18 Straight connector 2’’ Pcs 13 TZS 15,000.00 TZS 195,000.00 £30.37
19 Straight connector 1’’ Pcs 9 TZS 6,000.00 TZS 54,000.00 £19.49
20 Main connector ¾ ‘’ Pcs 15 TZS 4,500.00 TZS 67,500.00 £24.36
21 Straight connector ¾ ‘’ Pcs 20 TZS 4,500.00 TZS 90,000.00 £32.48
22 Thread Tape Pcs 70 TZS 1,000.00 TZS 70,000.00 £25.26
23 Reducing   socket Pcs 10 TZS 4,500.00 TZS 45,000.00 £16.24
24 Saddle   8’’ x 2’’ Pc 1 TZS 45,000.00 TZS 45,000.00 £16.24
25 Saddle 2’’ x 1’’ Pcs 11 TZS 15,000.00 TZS 165,000.00 £59.55
 26 Plug 1’’ Pcs 4 TZS 2,500.00 TZS 10,000.00 £3.61
 27 Saddle 1’’ x ¾ ‘’ Pcs 12 TZS 4,500.00 TZS 54,000.00 £19.49
28 Transport of materials Trips 2 TZS 200,000.00 TZS 400,000.00 £144.35
29 Sign Board Pcs 1 TZS 156,500.00 TZS 156,500.00 £56.48
 30 Technical labour support for joingn water and supply TZS 900,000.00 £324.79
31 Transport and communication TZS 280,000.00 £101.05
GRAND TOTAL TZS 19,841,000.00 £7,124.15
1st
Jan
1970

APPEAL: Three year old Sayyid Thulfiqar needs your help to live a happy and healthy life – family are $2,000 away from making this a reality


March 2017

Sayyid Thulfiqar Samer Abdullah lives in Najaf, Iraq. He lies with his parents and is their first born. At the age of three, Thufiqar should be developing his own identify, enjoying playing and learning. But life is very different for this little boy. From birth, Sayyid Thulfiqar has had a double outlet on the right ventricle of his heart with four openings. This has led to congenital heart disease and he has been in and out of surgery since he was just one year old. Aged one, he went to Turkey for treatment. The poor healthcare available in Iraq meant th